FACTOID # 10: The total number of state executions in 2005 was 60: 19 in Texas and 41 elsewhere. The racial split was 19 Black and 41 White.
 
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Encyclopedia > 1793
Centuries: 17th century - 18th century - 19th century
Decades: 1760s  1770s  1780s  - 1790s -  1800s  1810s  1820s
Years: 1790 1791 1792 - 1793 - 1794 1795 1796
1793 in topic:
Subjects:     Archaeology - Architecture -
Art - Literature - Music - Science
Countries:                       Canada
Great Britain - Mexico
Leaders:   State leaders - Colonial governors
Category: Establishments - Disestablishments
Births - Deaths - Works
v  d  e

Year 1793 (MDCCXCIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). These pages contain the trends of millennia and centuries. ... (16th century - 17th century - 18th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 17th century was that century which lasted from 1601-1700. ... (17th century - 18th century - 19th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 18th century refers to the century that lasted from 1701 through 1800. ... Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... This is a list of decades which have articles with more information about them. ... Events and Trends King George III ascends the British throne in 1760. ... Events and Trends For more events, see 18th century United States Declaration of Independence ratified by the Continental Congress (July 4, 1776). ... Nothing much really happened in the 1780s only that Mary-Anne Tobin was hung in public for wearing a flase beard and voting. ... Events and Trends French Revolution (1789 - 1799). ... // Invention of the Jacquard loom in 1801. ... Events and Trends End of the Napoleonic Wars in Europe (1803 - 1815). ... Nationalistic independence helped reshape the world during this decade: Greece gains independence from the Ottoman Empire in the Greek War of Independence (1821-1827). ... This page indexes the individual years pages. ... Year 1790 (MDCCXC) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... 1791 (MDCCXCI) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 11-day-slower Julian calendar). ... 1792 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... 1794 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... 1795 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1796 (MDCCXCVI) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Monday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... The decade of the 1790s in archaeology involved some significant events. ... The year 1793 in architecture involved some significant events. ... See also 1792 in art, Other events of 1793, 1794 in art, List of years in art // Jacques-Louis David - The Death of Marat July 19 - Thomas Doughty, landscape painter (d. ... See also: 1792 in literature, other events of 1793, 1794 in literature, list of years in literature. ... See also: 1792 in music, other events of 1793, 1794 in music and the list of years in music. Events September 25 - The Chevalier de Saint-Georges, the black Mozart, loses his command and is imprisoned at Houdainville. ... The year 1793 in science and technology included many events, some of which are listed here. ... 1792 state leaders - Events of 1793 - 1794 state leaders - State leaders by year Africa Ashanti Confederacy - Osei Kwame Panyin, Asantehene (1777-1803) Bunyoro - Kyebambe III, Omukama of Bunyoro (1786-1835) Dahomey - Agonglo, King of Dahomey (1789-1797) Ethiopia - Hezqeyas, Emperor of Ethiopia (1789-1795) Gobir - Bawa Jan Gwarzo, Ruler of... 1792 colonial governors - Events of 1793 - 1794 colonial governors - Colonial governors by year See also: List of state leaders in 1793 List of religious leaders in 1793 List of international organization leaders in 1793 Portugal Angola - Manuel de Almeida e Vasconcelos, Governor of Angola (1790-1797) Macau - D. Vasco Luis... Roman numerals are a numeral system originating in ancient Rome, adapted from Etruscan numerals. ... This is the calendar for a common year starting on Tuesday (dominical letter F), e. ... For the calendar of religious holidays and periods, see liturgical year. ... This is the calendar for any common year starting on Saturday (dominical letter B) e. ... The Julian calendar was introduced in 46 BC by Julius Caesar and came into force in 45 BC (709 ab urbe condita). ...

Contents

Events of 1793

January - June

is the 2nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Prussia (disambiguation). ... is the 9th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Jean-Pierre Blanchard (aka Jean Pierre François Blanchard), (7 July 1753 – 7 March 1809) was a French inventor, most remembered a pioneer in aviation and ballooning. ... For other uses, see Balloon (disambiguation). ... is the 21st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about a legislative body and constitutional convention during the French Revolution. ... Louis XVI, born Louis-Auguste de France (23 August 1754 – 21 January 1793) ruled as King of France and Navarre from 1774 until 1791, and then as King of the French from 1791 to 1792. ... This article is about the decapitation device. ... is the 32nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Combatants Great Britain Austria Prussia Spain[1] Russia Sardinia Ottoman Empire Portugal Dutch Republic[2] France The French Revolutionary Wars were a series of major conflicts, from 1792 until 1802, fought between the French Revolutionary government and several European states. ... is the 56th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... George Washington (February 22, 1732 – December 14, 1799)[1] led Americas Continental Army to victory over Britain in the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), and in 1789 was elected the first President of the United States of America. ... Alternate meanings in cabinet (disambiguation) A Cabinet is a body of high-ranking members of government, typically representing the executive branch. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... is the 58th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Type Bicameral Speaker of the House of Representatives House Majority Leader Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Steny Hoyer, (D) since January 4, 2007 House Minority Leader John Boehner, (R) since January 4, 2007 Members 435 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party... Alexander Hamilton (January 11, 1755 or 1757–July 12, 1804) was an Army officer, lawyer, Founding Father, American politician, leading statesman, financier and political theorist. ... is the 60th day of the year (61st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... John Langdon (June 26, 1741—September 18, 1819) was a politician from New Hampshire and one of the first two United States Senators from that state. ... Robert C. Byrd of West Virginia the current President pro tempore of the United States Senate. ... is the 62nd day of the year (63rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 63rd day of the year (64th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... George Washington (February 22, 1732 – December 14, 1799)[1] led Americas Continental Army to victory over Britain in the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), and in 1789 was elected the first President of the United States of America. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Philadelphia (disambiguation) and Philly. ... This article is about the day. ... Geography Country Belgium Community French Community Region Walloon Region Province Liège Arrondissement Liège Coordinates , , Area 69. ... is the 66th day of the year (67th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 77th day of the year (78th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Look up republic in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The Republic of Mainz was the first democratic state on German territory. ... Andreas Joseph Hofmann (July 14, 1752 - September 6, 1849[1]) was a German philosopher and revolutionary active in the Republic of Mainz. ... is the 91st day of the year (92nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... An earthquake is the result of a sudden release of stored energy in the Earths crust that creates seismic waves. ... is the 96th day of the year (97th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Committee of Public Safety (French: Comité de salut public), set up by the National Convention on April 6, 1793, formed the de facto executive government of France during the Reign of Terror (1793-4) of the French Revolution. ... According to a biographer, Dantons height was colossal, his make athletic, his features strongly marked, coarse, and displeasing; his voice shook the domes of the halls.[1] Georges Jacques Danton (October 26, 1759 – April 5, 1794) was a leading figure in the early stages of the French Revolution and... is the 112th day of the year (113th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... George Washington (February 22, 1732 – December 14, 1799)[1] led Americas Continental Army to victory over Britain in the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), and in 1789 was elected the first President of the United States of America. ... The Neutrality Proclamation was issued when George Washington decided he had a larger penis than Thomas Jefferson. ... is the 151st day of the year (152nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... François Hanriot (1761 - July 28, 1794), French revolutionist, was born at Nanterre (Seine) of poor parentage. ... The Girondists (in French Girondins, and sometimes Brissotins), comprised a political faction in France within the Legislative Assembly and the National Convention during the French Revolution. ... is the 153rd day of the year (154th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Girondists (in French Girondins, and sometimes Brissotins), comprised a political faction in France within the Legislative Assembly and the National Convention during the French Revolution. ... is the 161st day of the year (162nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Jardin des Plantes is the main botanical garden in France. ... The Muséum national dHistoire naturelle (MNHN) is the French national museum of natural history. ... This article is about the capital of France. ... Giraffes in Sydneys Taronga Zoo A zoological garden, zoological park, or zoo is a facility in which animals are confined within enclosures and displayed to the public, and in which they may also be bred. ...

July - December

is the 190th day of the year (191st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Wikisource has original text related to this article: Act Against Slavery, Upper Canada, 1793 The Act Against Slavery was an Act passed by Upper Canada on 1793-07-09 to prohibit slavery. ... Flag Map of Upper Canada (orange) Capital Newark 1792 - 1797 York(later renamed Toronto in 1834) 1797 - 1841 Language(s) English Religion Anglican Government Constitutional monarchy Sovereign  - 1791-1820 George III  - 1837-1841 Victoria Lieutenant-Governor See list of Lieutenant-Governors Legislature Parliament of Upper Canada  - Upper house Legislative Council... is the 194th day of the year (195th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Charlotte Corday by Paul Jacques Aimé Baudry, painted 1860: Under the Second Empire, Marat was seen as a revolutionary monster and Corday as a heroine of France, represented in the wall-map. ... Jean-Paul Marat Jean-Paul Marat (May 24, 1743 – July 13, 1793), was a Swiss-born French scientist and physician who made much of his career in the United Kingdom, but is best known as an activist in the French Revolution. ... is the 198th day of the year (199th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Charlotte Corday by Paul Jacques Aimé Baudry, painted 1860: Under the Second Empire, Marat was seen as a revolutionary monster and Corday as a heroine of France, represented in the wall-map. ... is the 203rd day of the year (204th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Alexander MacKenzie painted by Thomas Lawrence (c. ... is the 210th day of the year (211th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... John Graves Simcoe (February 25, 1752 – October 26, 1806) was the first lieutenant governor of Upper Canada (modern-day southern Ontario plus the watersheds of Georgian Bay and Lake Superior) from 1791-1796. ... is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the capital of France. ... Monarchism is the advocacy of the establishment, preservation, or restoration of a monarchy. ... is the 235th day of the year (236th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 248th day of the year (249th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about a legislative body and constitutional convention during the French Revolution. ... The French Revolution (1789–1815) was a period of political and social upheaval in the political history of France and Europe as a whole, during which the French governmental structure, previously an absolute monarchy with feudal privileges for the aristocracy and Catholic clergy, underwent radical change to forms based on... For the Doctor Who British TV serial, see The Reign of Terror (Doctor Who). ... is the 285th day of the year (286th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The first public university building in America, Old Easts corner stone was laid in 1793. ... Nickname: Location in North Carolina Coordinates: , Country State Counties Orange, Durham, and Chatham Founded 1793 Government  - Mayor Kevin C. Foy Area  - City  19. ... Official language(s) English Capital Raleigh Largest city Charlotte Largest metro area Charlotte metro area Area  Ranked 28th  - Total 53,865 sq mi (139,509 km²)  - Width 150 miles (240 km)  - Length 560[1] miles (901 km)  - % water 9. ... The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill is a public, coeducational, research university located in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States. ... is the 312th day of the year (313th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the capital of France. ... The French Revolution (1789–1815) was a period of political and social upheaval in the political history of France and Europe as a whole, during which the French governmental structure, previously an absolute monarchy with feudal privileges for the aristocracy and Catholic clergy, underwent radical change to forms based on... This article is about the museum. ... The Louvre Museum in Paris, one of the largest and most famous museums in the world. ... is the 287th day of the year (288th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Marie-Antoinette, Queen of France and Archduchess of Austria (born November 1755 – executed 16 October 1793) Daughter of Maria Theresa of Austria, wife of Louis XVI and mother of Louis XVII. She was guillotined at the height of the French Revolution. ... is the 288th day of the year (289th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Marie-Antoinette, Queen of France and Archduchess of Austria (born November 1755 – executed 16 October 1793) Daughter of Maria Theresa of Austria, wife of Louis XVI and mother of Louis XVII. She was guillotined at the height of the French Revolution. ... is the 289th day of the year (290th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Marie-Antoinette, Queen of France and Archduchess of Austria (born November 1755 – executed 16 October 1793) Daughter of Maria Theresa of Austria, wife of Louis XVI and mother of Louis XVII. She was guillotined at the height of the French Revolution. ... is the 297th day of the year (298th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The French Revolutionary Calendar or French Republican Calendar is a calendar proposed during the French Revolution, and in use by the French government for 13 years from 1793. ... is the 301st day of the year (302nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Eli Whitney Eli Whitney (b. ... A cotton gin is a machine that quickly and easily separates the cotton fibres from the seedpods and the sometimes sticky seeds. ... is the 304th day of the year (305th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Girondists (in French Girondins, and sometimes Brissotins or Baguettes), were a political faction in France within the Legislative Assembly and the National Convention during the French Revolution. ... This article is about the decapitation device. ... is the 342nd day of the year (343rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Jeanne Becu, Comtesse Du Barry [1] [2] (Marie-Jeanne, Comtesse Du Barry) (August 19, 1743 - December 8, 1793) was a French courtesan who became the mistress of Louis XV of France. ... is the 343rd day of the year (344th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... Noah Webster Noah Webster (October 16, 1758 – April 28, 1843) was an American lexicographer, textbook author, spelling reformer, political writer, and editor. ... is the 352nd day of the year (353rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... General Dugommier Jacques François Coquille named Dugommier (August 1, 1738, Trois-Rivières (Guadeloupe) - November 17, 1794, at the battle of the Black Mountains) was a French general. ... Panorama of Toulon area. ... Vice Admiral is a naval rank of three star level, equivalent to Lieutenant General in seniority. ... Admiral Samuel Hood, 1st Viscount Hood, 1724–1816 by James Northcote, painted 1784. ... The British 32-gun frigate, H.M.S. Lutine was launched at Brest in 1785, as La Lutine for the French Royal Navy. ...

Undated

For the international law of the sea, see Admiralty law. ... Scurvy (N.Lat. ... Claude Chappe Claude Chappe (December 25, 1763 – January 23, 1805) was a French inventor who in 1792 demonstrated a practical semaphore system that eventually spanned all of France. ... A Chappe semaphore tower near Saverne, France // The semaphore or optical telegraph is an apparatus for conveying information by means of visual signals, with towers with pivoting blades or paddles, shutters, in a matrix, or hand-held flags etc. ... Nickname: City of Brotherly Love, Philly, the Quaker City Motto: Philadelphia maneto (Let brotherly love continue) Location in Pennsylvania Coordinates: Country United States State Pennsylvania County Philadelphia Founded October 27, 1682 Incorporated October 25, 1701 Mayor John F. Street (D) Area    - City 369. ... The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... The name First Coalition (1793–1797) designates the first major concerted effort of multiple European powers to contain Revolutionary France. ... This article is about the medieval empire. ... Seal of the U.S. Mint The United States Mint primarily produces circulating coinage for the United States to conduct its trade and commerce. ... Niccolò (or Nicolò) Paganini (October 27, 1782 – May 27, 1840) was an Italian violinist, violist, guitarist and composer. ... A French Revolutionary Calendar in the Historical Museum of Lausanne. ...

Ongoing events

The French Revolution (1789–1815) was a period of political and social upheaval in the political history of France and Europe as a whole, during which the French governmental structure, previously an absolute monarchy with feudal privileges for the aristocracy and Catholic clergy, underwent radical change to forms based on... Year 1789 (MDCCLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... 1799 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Combatants Great Britain Austria Prussia Spain[1] Russia Sardinia Ottoman Empire Portugal Dutch Republic[2] France The French Revolutionary Wars were a series of major conflicts, from 1792 until 1802, fought between the French Revolutionary government and several European states. ... 1792 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... --69. ... The name First Coalition (1793–1797) designates the first major concerted effort of multiple European powers to contain Revolutionary France. ...

Births

1793 in other calendars
Gregorian calendar 1793
MDCCXCIII
Ab urbe condita 2546
Armenian calendar 1242
ԹՎ ՌՄԽԲ
Bahá'í calendar -51 – -50
Buddhist calendar 2337
Chinese calendar 4429/4489-11-19
(壬子年十一月十九日)
— to —
4430/4490-11-29
(癸丑年十一月廿九日)
Coptic calendar 1509 – 1510
Ethiopian calendar 1785 – 1786
Hebrew calendar 5553 – 5554
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 1848 – 1849
 - Shaka Samvat 1715 – 1716
 - Kali Yuga 4894 – 4895
Holocene calendar 11793
Iranian calendar 1171 – 1172
Islamic calendar 1207 – 1208
Japanese calendar Kansei 5

(寛政5年) For the calendar of religious holidays and periods, see liturgical year. ... Ab urbe condita (related with Anno urbis conditae: AUC or a. ... The Armenian calendar uses the Armenian numerals. ... The Baháí calendar, also called the Badí‘ calendar, used by the Baháí Faith, is a solar calendar with regular years of 365 days, and leap years of 366 days. ... The Buddhist calendar is used on mainland southeast Asia in the countries of Cambodia, Laos, Thailand, and Myanmar (formerly Burma) in several related forms. ... The Chinese calendar is a lunisolar calendar, incorporating elements of a lunar calendar with those of a solar calendar. ... The Chinese sexagenary cycle (Chinese: ; pinyin: gānzhÄ«) is a cyclic numeral system of 60 combinations of the two basic cycles, the ten Heavenly Stems (天干; tiāngān) and the twelve Earthly Branches (地支; dìzhÄ«). These have been traditionally used as a means of numbering the years, not only in... The Chinese sexagenary cycle (Chinese: ; pinyin: gānzhÄ«) is a cyclic numeral system of 60 combinations of the two basic cycles, the ten Heavenly Stems (天干; tiāngān) and the twelve Earthly Branches (地支; dìzhÄ«). These have been traditionally used as a means of numbering the years, not only in... The Coptic calendar, also called the Alexandrian calendar, is used by the Coptic Orthodox Church. ... The Ethiopian calendar (Amharic: የኢትዮጵያ ዘመን አቆጣጠር ), also called the Geez calendar, is the principal calendar used in Ethiopia and is also the liturgical year of Christians in Eritrea belonging to the Eritrean Orthodox Tewahdo Church, Eastern Catholic Church of Eritrea and Lutheran (Evangelical Church of Eritrea), where it is commonly known... The Hebrew calendar (Hebrew: ‎) or Jewish calendar is the annual calendar used in Judaism. ... A page from the Hindu calendar 1871-72. ... There is disagreement as to the meaning of the Indian word Samvat. ... The Indian national calendar (sometimes called Saka calendar) is the official civil calendar in use in India. ... Kali Yuga is also the title of a book by Roland Charles Wagner. ... The Holocene calendar, Human Era count or Jōmon Era count (Japan) uses a dating system similar to astronomical year numbering but adds 10,000, placing a year 0 at the start of the Jōmon Era (JE), the Human Era (HE, the beginning of human civilization) and the aproximate... The Iranian calendar (Persian: ) also known as Persian calendar or the Jalāli Calendar is a solar calendar currently used in Iran and Afghanistan. ... The Islamic calendar or Muslim calendar (Arabic: التقويم الهجري; at-taqwÄ«m al-hijrÄ«; Persian: تقویم هجري قمری ‎ taqwÄ«m-e hejri-ye qamari; also called the Hijri calendar) is the calendar used to date events in many predominantly Muslim countries, and used by Muslims everywhere to determine the proper day on which to celebrate... Koinobori, flags decorated like koi, are popular decorations around Childrens Day This mural on the wall of a Tokyo subway station celebrates Hazuki, the eighth month. ... Kansei (寛政) was a Japanese era after Tenmei and before Kyōwa and spanned from February, 1789 to March, 1801. ...

 - Imperial Year Kōki 2453
(皇紀2453年)
Julian calendar 1838
Korean calendar 4126
Thai solar calendar 2336
v  d  e
See also Category: 1793 births.

It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Japanese era name. ... The Julian calendar was introduced in 46 BC by Julius Caesar and came into force in 45 BC (709 ab urbe condita). ... The traditional Korean calendar is directly derived from the Asian calendar. ... The Thai solar, or Suriyakati (สุริยคติ), calendar is used in traditional and official contexts in Thailand, although the Western calendar is sometimes used in business. ... is the 3rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Lucretia Coffin Mott (January 3, 1793 – November 11, 1880) was an American Quaker minister, abolitionist, social reformer and proponent of womens rights. ... Year 1880 (MDCCCLXXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 14th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require rewriting and/or reformatting. ... 1852 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... is the 61st day of the year (62nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Samuel Houston (March 2, 1793–July 26, 1863) was a 19th century American statesman, politician and soldier. ... Categories: | | ... Year 1863 (MDCCCLXIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 62nd day of the year (63rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... William Charles Macready (March 3, 1793 - April 27, 1873), English actor, was born in London, and educated at Rugby. ... 1873 (MDCCCLXXIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... is the 63rd day of the year (64th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Karl Konrad Friedrich Wilhelm Lachmann (March 4, 1793 - March 13, 1851), was a German philologist and critic. ... 1851 (MDCCCLI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... is the 65th day of the year (66th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... William Dick was an Australian politician, elected as a member of the New South Wales Legislative Assembly. ... 1866 (MDCCCLXVI) is a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... is the 109th day of the year (110th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Emperor Ferdinand Ferdinand I Karl Leopold Joseph Franz Marchlin Emperor of Austria King of Hungary and Bohemia (April 19, 1793 – June 29, 1875) succeeded his father (Franz II Holy Roman Emperor/Franz I of Austria) as Emperor and King in 1835 and was forced to abdicate in 1848. ... 1875 (MDCCCLXXV) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... is the 152nd day of the year (153rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Augustus Earle, , (1824): watercolour; 17. ... | Jöns Jakob Berzelius, discoverer of protein 1838 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... is the 157th day of the year (158th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Edward C. Delevan (1793-1871) was a wealthy businessman who devoted much of his fortune to promoting the temperance movement. ... A cartoon from Australia ca. ... 1871 (MDCCCLXXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... is the 268th day of the year (269th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Felicia Hemans (September 25, 1793 - 1835), was an English poetess. ... | Come and take it, slogan of the Texas Revolution 1835 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... is the 307th day of the year (308th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Stephen F. Austin Stephen Fuller Austin (November 3, 1793 – December 27, 1836), known as the Father of Texas, led the second and ultimately successful colonization of the region by the United States. ... Year 1836 (MDCCCXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ...

Deaths

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1793
See also Category: 1793 deaths.

  Results from FactBites:
 
Nova Scotia Archives & Records Management - Poll tax rolls, 1791-1793 (422 words)
To deal with the provincial debt the legislature passed poll tax acts in 1791, 1792 and 1793 which levied a capitation tax on all adult males.
The amount of tax was based on a person's employment and their ownership of cattle or sheep and was collected until the legislation was repealed in 1796.
The legislation required multiple copies of the rolls, and after 1793, required that one copy be sent directly to the Treasury in Halifax.
The Bermuda Copper of 1793 - Introduction (866 words)
It seems Boulton was awarded the contract by the summer of 1793 and produced the coins during the next six months with the initial release in Bermuda at the end of April 1794.
An act signed by the governor of Bermuda, Henry Hamilton, on April 26, 1794, stated the coppers were to pass at the same rate as English halfpence, that is, twelve coppers to the shilling, and they were to be legal tender up to a limit of eleven coppers in any one purchase.
The ship is generally taken to represent the "Sea Adventurer," which was the ship depicted on the "Hogge" shilling; however it is also possible that it is simply a generic ship similar to the one on the Bahama copper.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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