FACTOID # 18: Alaska spends more money per capita on elementary and secondary education than any other state.
 
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Encyclopedia > 1721
Centuries: 17th century - 18th century - 19th century
Decades: 1690s  1700s  1710s  - 1720s -  1730s  1740s  1750s
Years: 1718 1719 1720 - 1721 - 1722 1723 1724
1721 in topic:
Subjects:     Archaeology - Architecture -
Art - Literature - Music - Science
Countries:                       Canada
Great Britain - Mexico
Leaders:   State leaders - Colonial governors
Category: Establishments - Disestablishments
Births - Deaths - Works
v  d  e

Year 1721 (MDCCXXI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). These pages contain the trends of millennia and centuries. ... (16th century - 17th century - 18th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 17th century was that century which lasted from 1601-1700. ... (17th century - 18th century - 19th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 18th century refers to the century that lasted from 1701 through 1800. ... Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... This is a list of decades which have articles with more information about them. ... Events and Trends Thomas Neale designed Seven Dials The Salem Witchcraft Trials are held in Massachusetts Bay Colony (1692). ... Events and trends The Bonneville Slide blocks the Columbia River near the site of present-day Cascade Locks, Oregon with a land bridge 200 feet (60 m) high. ... Events and Trends World Leaders King Louis XIV of France (1643 - 1715) Philippe II of Orléans, Regent of France (1715 - 1723). ... Events and Trends Manufacture of the earliest surviving pianos. ... Events and Trends The Great Awakening - A Protestant religious movement active in the British colonies of North America Sextant invented (probably around 1730) independently by John Hadley in Great Britain and Thomas Godfrey in the American colonies World leaders Louis XV King of France (king from 1715 to 1774) George... Events and Trends The War of Austrian Succession (1740-1748) rages. ... Scientific navigation is developed The Seven Years War (1756-1763) fought between two rival alliances: the first consisting of the Kingdom of Great Britain, Hanover, and Prussia; the second consisting of Austria, France, Imperial Russia, Saxony, and Sweden. ... This page indexes the individual years pages. ... Year 1718 (MDCCXVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... // Events January 23 - The Principality of Liechtenstein is created within the Holy Roman Empire April 25 - Daniel Defoe publishes Robinson Crusoe June 10 - Battle of Glen Shiel Prussia conducts Europes first systematic census Miners in Falun, Sweden find an apparently petrified body of Fet-Mats Israelsson in an unused... // Events January 6 - The Committee of Inquiry on the South Sea Bubble publishes its findings February 11 - Sweden and Prussia sign the (2nd Treaty of Stockholm) declaring peace. ... // Events Abraham De Moivre states De Moivres theorem connecting trigonometric functions and complex numbers Publication of the first book of Bachs Well-Tempered Clavier Fall of Persias Safavid dynasty during a bloody revolt of the Afghani people. ... Events February 16 - Louis XV of France attains his majority Births February 24 - John Burgoyne, British general (d. ... Events January 14 - King Philip V of Spain abdicates the throne February 20 - The premiere of Giulio Cesare, an Italian opera by George Frideric Handel, takes place in London June 23 - Treaty of Constantinople signed. ... The decade of the 1720s in archaeology involved some significant events. ... See also: 1720 in architecture, other events of 1721 1722 in architecture and the architecture timeline. ... See also: 1720 in art, other events of 1721, 1722 in art, list of years in art. ... See also: 1720 in literature, other events of 1721, 1722 in literature, list of years in literature. ... See also: 1720 in music, other events of 1721, 1722 in music, list of years in music. ... The year 1721 in science and technology included many events, some of which are listed here. ... 1720 state leaders - Events of 1721 - 1722 state leaders - State leaders by year Africa Ashanti Confederacy - Opoku Ware I, Asantehene (1720-1750) Bunyoro - Olimi III, Omukama of Bunyoro (c. ... 1720 colonial governors - Events of 1721 - 1722 colonial governors - Colonial governors by year See also: List of state leaders in 1721 List of religious leaders in 1721 List of international organization leaders in 1721 Portugal Angola - Henrique de Figueiredo e Alarcão, Governor of Angola (1717-1722) Macau - Antonio da... Roman numerals are a numeral system originating in ancient Rome, adapted from Etruscan numerals. ... This is the calendar for a common year starting on Wednesday (dominical letter E), e. ... For the calendar of religious holidays and periods, see liturgical year. ... This is the calendar for any common year starting on Sunday (dominical letter A), in other words, a common year where Doomsday is Tuesday. ... The Julian calendar was introduced in 46 BC by Julius Caesar and came into force in 45 BC (709 ab urbe condita). ...

Contents

Events of 1721

Download high resolution version (434x601, 26 KB)Robert Walpole This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... Download high resolution version (434x601, 26 KB)Robert Walpole This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... is the 94th day of the year (95th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Robert Walpole, 1st Earl of Orford, (commonly known as Robert Walpole, or Sir Robert Walpole) KG, KB, PC (26 August 1676 – 18 March 1745) was a British statesman who is generally regarded as having been the first Prime Minister of Great Britain. ...

January - June

is the 128th day of the year (129th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Pope Innocient XIII (May 13, 1655 – March 7, 1724) was pope from 1721 until his death. ... Clement XI, né Giovanni Francesco Albani (July 23, 1649 – March 19, 1721) was pope from 1700 to 1721. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Wycliffe Tyndale · Luther · Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      The Pope (from Latin... is the 94th day of the year (95th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Robert Walpole, 1st Earl of Orford, (commonly known as Robert Walpole, or Sir Robert Walpole) KG, KB, PC (26 August 1676 – 18 March 1745) was a British statesman who is generally regarded as having been the first Prime Minister of Great Britain. ...

July - December

is the 253rd day of the year (254th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Treaty of Nystad (1721), signed at the present-day Finnish town of Uusikaupunki (Swedish Nystad), ended the Great Northern War, in which Russia received the territories of Estonia, Livonia and Ingria, as well as much of Karelia and Tsar Peter I of Russia replaced King Frederick I of Sweden... Combatants Sweden Ottoman Empire (1710–1714) Ukrainian Cossacks Russia Denmark-Norway Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth Saxony after 1718 Prussia Hanover Commanders Charles XII of Sweden Ahmed III Ivan Mazepa Peter the Great Frederick IV of Denmark Augustus II the Strong Strength 77,000 in the beginning of the war. ... is the 306th day of the year (307th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Peter the Great or Pyotr Alexeyevich Romanov (Russian: Пётр I Алексеевич Pyotr I Alekse`yevich, Пётр Великий Pyotr Veli`kiy) (9 June 1672 – 8 February 1725 [30 May 1672–28 January 1725 O.S.][1]) ruled Russia from 7 May (27 April O.S.) 1682 until his death, jointly ruling before 1696 with his... The word Russia has been used to refer to several Russian states: Russian Federation, the modern successor state of Russian SFSR and the Soviet Union The Soviet Union, a multinational union of socialist republics Russian SFSR, a soviet republic in the union Bolshevik Russia, the revolutionary state during the Russian...

Undated

“Bach” redirects here. ... Johann Sebastian Bach, c. ...

Ongoing Events

Combatants Sweden Ottoman Empire (1710–1714) Ukrainian Cossacks Russia Denmark-Norway Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth Saxony after 1718 Prussia Hanover Commanders Charles XII of Sweden Ahmed III Ivan Mazepa Peter the Great Frederick IV of Denmark Augustus II the Strong Strength 77,000 in the beginning of the war. ... Events January 1 - Russia accepts Julian calendar. ...

Births

1721 in other calendars
Gregorian calendar 1721
MDCCXXI
Ab urbe condita 2474
Armenian calendar 1170
ԹՎ ՌՃՀ
Bahá'í calendar -123 – -122
Buddhist calendar 2265
Chinese calendar 4357/4417-12-4
(庚子年十二月初四日)
— to —
4358/4418-11-13
(辛丑年十一月十三日)
Coptic calendar 1437 – 1438
Ethiopian calendar 1713 – 1714
Hebrew calendar 5481 – 5482
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 1776 – 1777
 - Shaka Samvat 1643 – 1644
 - Kali Yuga 4822 – 4823
Holocene calendar 11721
Iranian calendar 1099 – 1100
Islamic calendar 1133 – 1134
Japanese calendar Kyōhō 6

(享保6年) For the calendar of religious holidays and periods, see liturgical year. ... Ab urbe condita (related with Anno urbis conditae: AUC or a. ... The Armenian calendar uses the Armenian numerals. ... The Baháí calendar, also called the Badí‘ calendar, used by the Baháí Faith, is a solar calendar with regular years of 365 days, and leap years of 366 days. ... The Buddhist calendar is used on mainland southeast Asia in the countries of Cambodia, Laos, Thailand, and Myanmar (formerly Burma) in several related forms. ... The Chinese calendar is a lunisolar calendar, incorporating elements of a lunar calendar with those of a solar calendar. ... The Chinese sexagenary cycle (Chinese: ; pinyin: gānzhÄ«) is a cyclic numeral system of 60 combinations of the two basic cycles, the ten Heavenly Stems (天干; tiāngān) and the twelve Earthly Branches (地支; dìzhÄ«). These have been traditionally used as a means of numbering the years, not only in... The Chinese sexagenary cycle (Chinese: ; pinyin: gānzhÄ«) is a cyclic numeral system of 60 combinations of the two basic cycles, the ten Heavenly Stems (天干; tiāngān) and the twelve Earthly Branches (地支; dìzhÄ«). These have been traditionally used as a means of numbering the years, not only in... The Coptic calendar, also called the Alexandrian calendar, is used by the Coptic Orthodox Church. ... The Ethiopian calendar (Amharic: የኢትዮጵያ ዘመን አቆጣጠር ), also called the Geez calendar, is the principal calendar used in Ethiopia and is also the liturgical year of Christians in Eritrea belonging to the Eritrean Orthodox Tewahdo Church, Eastern Catholic Church of Eritrea and Lutheran (Evangelical Church of Eritrea), where it is commonly known... The Hebrew calendar (Hebrew: ‎) or Jewish calendar is the annual calendar used in Judaism. ... A page from the Hindu calendar 1871-72. ... There is disagreement as to the meaning of the Indian word Samvat. ... The Indian national calendar (sometimes called Saka calendar) is the official civil calendar in use in India. ... Kali Yuga is also the title of a book by Roland Charles Wagner. ... The Holocene calendar, Human Era count or Jōmon Era count (Japan) uses a dating system similar to astronomical year numbering but adds 10,000, placing a year 0 at the start of the Jōmon Era (JE), the Human Era (HE, the beginning of human civilization) and the aproximate... The Iranian calendar (Persian: ) also known as Persian calendar or the Jalāli Calendar is a solar calendar currently used in Iran and Afghanistan. ... The Islamic calendar or Muslim calendar (Arabic: التقويم الهجري; at-taqwÄ«m al-hijrÄ«; Persian: تقویم هجري قمری ‎ taqwÄ«m-e hejri-ye qamari; also called the Hijri calendar) is the calendar used to date events in many predominantly Muslim countries, and used by Muslims everywhere to determine the proper day on which to celebrate... Koinobori, flags decorated like koi, are popular decorations around Childrens Day This mural on the wall of a Tokyo subway station celebrates Hazuki, the eighth month. ... Kyōhō (享保) was a Japanese era after Shōtoku and before Gembun and spanned from 1716 to 1736. ...

 - Imperial Year Kōki 2381
(皇紀2381年)
Julian calendar 1766
Korean calendar 4054
Thai solar calendar 2264
v  d  e
See also Category: 1721 births.

It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Japanese era name. ... The Julian calendar was introduced in 46 BC by Julius Caesar and came into force in 45 BC (709 ab urbe condita). ... The traditional Korean calendar is directly derived from the Asian calendar. ... The Thai solar, or Suriyakati (สุริยคติ), calendar is used in traditional and official contexts in Thailand, although the Western calendar is sometimes used in business. ... is the 10th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Johann Philipp Baratier (January 10, 1721, Schwabach near Nuremberg — October 5, 1740) was a German scholar who in a very short life published eleven works and authored a great quantity of unpublished manuscript. ... Events May 31 - Friedrich II comes to power in Prussia upon the death of his father, Friedrich Wilhelm I. October 20 - Maria Theresia of Austria inherits the Habsburg hereditary dominions (Austria, Bohemia, Hungary and present-day Belgium). ... is the 34th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Friedrich Wilhelm von Seydlitz Friedrich Wilhelm, Freiherr von Seydlitz (February 3, 1721 - August 27, 1773), Prussian soldier, one of the greatest cavalry generals of history, was born at Kalkar in the duchy of Cleves, where his father, a major of Prussian cavalry, was stationed. ... 1773 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... is the 52nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... John McKinly (February 21, 1721–August 21, 1796) was an American physician and politician from Wilmington, Delaware, in New Castle County. ... Year 1796 (MDCCXCVI) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Monday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 78th day of the year (79th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Tobias Smollett Tobias George Smollett (March 19, 1721 - September 17, 1771) was a Scottish author, best known for his picaresque novels, such as Roderick Random and Peregrine Pickle. ... 1771 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... is the 93rd day of the year (94th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Shermans marble statute in the National Statuary Hall Collection in the United States Capitol. ... Year 1793 (MDCCXCIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 101st day of the year (102nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... David Zeisberger (11 April 1721 – 17 November 1808) was a Moravian clergyman and missionary among the Native Americans in the Thirteen Colonies, who established communities of converts in the valley of the Muskingum River in Ohio, and for a time, near modern Amherstburg, Ontario. ... Year 1808 (MDCCCVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 105th day of the year (106th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Prince William Augustus, Duke of Cumberland, KG, KB, PC (15 April 1721–31 October 1765), a younger son of King George II of Great Britain and Queen Caroline, was a noted military leader. ... Year 1765 (MDCCLXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 109th day of the year (110th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Shermans marble statute in the National Statuary Hall Collection in the United States Capitol. ... 1803 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... is the 190th day of the year (191st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Johann Nikolaus Götz (July 9, 1721 – November 4, 1781), German poet, was born at Worms. ... 1781 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... is the 195th day of the year (196th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... John Douglas (July 14, 1721–May 18, 1807) was a Scottish scholar and Anglican bishop. ... Year 1807 (MDCCCVII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar). ... is the 216th day of the year (217th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Granville Leveson-Gower, 1st Marquess of Stafford, 2nd Earl Gower (4 August 1721 - 26 October 1803) was a British politician. ... 1803 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... is the 243rd day of the year (244th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... George William Hervey, 2nd Earl of Bristol (August 31, 1721 – March 18? or 20?, 1775), the eldest son of The Lord Hervey of Ickworth, by his marriage with Mary (1700-1768), daughter of Nicholas Lepell. ... Year 1775 (MDCCLXXV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 257th day of the year (258th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Eliphalet Dyer (September 14, 1721 – May 13, 1807) was a lawyer, jurist, and statesman from Windham, Connecticut. ... Year 1807 (MDCCCVII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar). ... is the 292nd day of the year (293rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Joseph de Guignes (October 19, 1721 - 1800), French orientalist, was born at Pontoise. ... // ON MAY 5 1853 MR.FADER HAD SEX WITH A MAN NAME MR WIEN THEN THEY HAD SON NAMEDMRS COTURE AND MR MANOOGIAN WENT INTO MRS HASKELLS OFFICE NAKED AND DANCED AROUND AND MASTERBATED ON HER CHEST AND SHE LICKED IT OFF THEN THEY HAD ORAL SEEX WITH NAPLOEAN OF... is the 313th day of the year (314th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Mark Akenside (November 9, 1721 – June 23, 1770), was an English poet and physician. ... For the village in Queensland, see 1770, Queensland. ... is the 326th day of the year (327th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Joseph F.W. DesBarres (November 22, 1721 - October 27, 1824) was a Swiss-born cartographer and Canadian statesman, who served as aide-de-camp to General James Wolfe in Quebec. ... 1824 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... December 6 is the 340th day of the year (341st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... James Elphinston (December 6, 1721 – October 8, 1809) was a well noted 18th Century Scottish educator, orthographer, phonologist and linguistics expert. ... Year 1809 (MDCCCIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar). ... December 6 is the 340th day of the year (341st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Guillaume-Chrétien de Lamoignon de Malesherbes Guillaume-Chrétien de Lamoignon de Malesherbes, often referred to as Malesherbes or Lamoignon-Malesherbes (December 6, 1721–April 23, 1794) was a French statesman, minister, and afterwards counsel for the defence of Louis XVI. Born at Paris from a famous legal family... 1794 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... December 27 is the 361st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (362nd in leap years). ... François Hemsterhuis (December 27, 1721 - July 7, 1790), Dutch writer on aesthetics and moral philosophy, son of Tiberius Hemsterhuis, was born at Franeker in Holland. ... Year 1790 (MDCCXC) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 363rd day of the year (364th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Madame de Pompadours portrait Madame de Pompadour (December 29, 1721 - April 15, 1764) was the famous mistress of King Louis XV of France. ... Louis XV, called the Beloved (French: le Bien-Aimé) (February 15, 1710 – May 10, 1774), ruled as King of France and Navarre from 1715 until his death. ... 1764 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ...

Deaths

See also Category: 1721 deaths.

is the 47th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... James Cragg the Younger (9 April 1686 - 16 February 1721), son of James Cragg the Elder, was born at Westminster. ... 1686 (MDCLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 55th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... John Sheffield was the 1st Duke of BuckinghamSHIRE not the 1st Duke of Buckingham. ... 1648 (MDCXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Saturday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... March 16 is the 75th day of the year (76th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... James Craggs the Elder (10 June 1657 - 16 March 1721), English politician, father of James Craggs the Younger, was a son of Anthony Craggs of Holbeck, Durham, and was baptized on the 10th of June 1657. ... Events January 8 - Miles Sindercombe, would-be-assassin of Oliver Cromwell, and his group are captured in London February - Admiral Robert Blake defeats the Spanish West Indian Fleet in a battle over the seizure of Jamaica. ... is the 78th day of the year (79th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Clement XI, né Giovanni Francesco Albani (July 23, 1649 – March 19, 1721) was pope from 1700 to 1721. ... // Events January 30 - King Charles I of England, Scotland and Ireland is beheaded. ... April 14 is the 104th day of the year (105th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 261 days remaining. ... Michel Chamillart Michel Chamillart or Chamillard (1652 - 14 April 1721) was a French statesman, a minister of King Louis XIV of France. ... // Events April 6 - Dutch sailor Jan van Riebeeck establishes a resupply camp for the Dutch East India Company at the Cape of Good Hope, and founded Cape Town. ... is the 189th day of the year (190th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Elihu Yale Elihu Yale, (April 5, 1649 – July 8, 1721), was the first benefactor of Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut in the United States. ... // Events January 30 - King Charles I of England, Scotland and Ireland is beheaded. ... is the 199th day of the year (200th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Jean-Antoine Watteau (October 10, 1684 - July 18, 1721) was a French Rococo painter. ... Events France under Louis XIV makes Truce of Ratisbon separately with the Empire and Spain. ... is the 215th day of the year (216th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... One of the many bookcase carvings Gibbons made for the Wren Library, Cambridge. ... 1648 (MDCXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Saturday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 225th day of the year (226th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Jacques Lelong (April 19, 1665 - August 13, 1721), French bibliographer, was born at Paris. ... Year 1665 (MDCLXV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 251st day of the year (252nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Michael Johann Joseph Brokoff (Czech: Michal Jan Josef Brokoff, 28 April 1686 in Klášterec nad Ohří, Bohemia - 8 September 1721 in Prague) was a Czech sculptor of the baroque era, working with sandstone. ... 1686 (MDCLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... Henri Arnaud (1641-1721) was a pastor of the Vaudois, who turned soldier to rescue, and did rescue, his co-religionists from their dispersion under the persecution of the Count of Savoy. ... Events The Long Parliament passes a series of legislation designed to contain Charles Is absolutist tendencies. ... is the 254th day of the year (255th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Rudolf Jakob Camerarius (February 12, 1665 - September 11, 1721) was a German botanist and physician. ... Year 1665 (MDCLXV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 261st day of the year (262nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Matthew Prior (July 21, 1664 – September 18, 1721) was an English poet and diplomat. ... Events March 12 - New Jersey becomes a colony of England. ... is the 263rd day of the year (264th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Thomas Doggett (or Dogget), (ca. ... Year 1670 (MDCLXX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 284th day of the year (285th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... A controversial presence: the 1895 statue of Edward Colston Edward Colston (2 November 1636 – 11 October 1721) was a Bristol-born English merchant and philanthropist. ... Year 1636 (MDCXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Friday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 347th day of the year (348th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Alexander Selkirk, born Alexander Selcraig, (1676–13 December 1721) was a Scottish sailor who spent four years as a castaway on an uninhabited island; it is probable that his travails provided the inspiration for Defoes Robinson Crusoe. ... Events January 29 - Feodor III becomes Tsar of Russia First measurement of the speed of light, by Ole Rømer Bacons Rebellion Russo-Turkish Wars commence. ... December 17 is the 351st day of the year (352nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Richard Lumley, 1st Earl of Scarborough (1650 - December 17, 1721) was an English statesman best known for his role in the Glorious Revolution. ... Year 1650 (MDCL) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1670 (MDCLXX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ...

Notes

  1. ^ Clear, Todd R., Cole, George F., Resig, Michael D. (2006). American Corrections Seventh Edition. Thompson. 

  Results from FactBites:
 
APPLICABILITY OF 18 U.S.C. § 1721 TO COLLECTION OF FEE FOR STAMPED CARDS (5787 words)
Section 1721 prohibits the sale by postal employees "of postage stamps or postal cards for any larger or less sum than the values indicated on their faces," and it makes no express exception for official actions.
Thus, if § 1721, which requires that both postage stamps and postal cards be sold for no more or less than "the values indicated on their faces," imposed a requirement that these items always indicate the monetary amount of their sales price on their faces, then letter-series stamps would have been prohibited.
The legislative history at no point states that the statute was intended to protect against fraudulent practices through the imposition of a broad prophylactic rule that would preclude the sale of postal cards for an amount greater than the stamped postage in circumstances when no other monetary amount would appear on their faces.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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