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Encyclopedia > 1381
Years:
1378 1379 1380 - 1381 - 1382 1383 1384
Decades:
1350s 1360s 1370s - 1380s - 1390s 1400s 1410s
Centuries:
13th century - 14th century - 15th century
1381 by topic
Politics
State leaders - Sovereign states
Birth and death categories
Births - Deaths
Establishments and disestablishments categories
Establishments - Disestablishments
v  d  e
1381 in other calendars
Gregorian calendar 1381
MCCCLXXXI
Ab urbe condita 2134
Armenian calendar 830
ԹՎ ՊԼ
Bahá'í calendar -463 – -462
Buddhist calendar 1925
Chinese calendar 4017/4077-12-6
(庚申年十二月初六日)
— to —
4018/4078-12-16
(辛酉年十二月十六日)
Coptic calendar 1097 – 1098
Ethiopian calendar 1373 – 1374
Hebrew calendar 5141 – 5142
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 1436 – 1437
 - Shaka Samvat 1303 – 1304
 - Kali Yuga 4482 – 4483
Holocene calendar 11381
Iranian calendar 759 – 760
Islamic calendar 782 – 783
Japanese calendar
 - Imperial Year Kōki 2041
(皇紀2041年)
Julian calendar 1426
Korean calendar 3714
Thai solar calendar 1924
v  d  e

Year 1381 was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. Events March - John Wyclif tried to gain public favour by laying his theses before parliament, and then made them public in a tract. ... Year 1379 was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. ... September 8 - Battle of Kulikovo - Russian forces under Grand Prince Dmitri Donskoi of Moscow resist a large invasion by the Blue Horde, Lithuania and Ryazan, stopping their advance at Kulikovo. ... Year 1382 was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. ... Year 1383 was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. ... Year 1384 was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. ... This is a list of decades which have articles with more information about them. ... Centuries: 13th century - 14th century - 15th century Decades: 1300s 1310s 1320s 1330s 1340s - 1350s - 1360s 1370s 1380s 1390s 1400s Years: 1350 1351 1352 1353 1354 1355 1356 1357 1358 1359 Events and Trends Categories: 1350s ... Centuries: 13th century - 14th century - 15th century Decades: 1310s 1320s 1330s 1340s 1350s - 1360s - 1370s 1380s 1390s 1400s 1410s Years: 1360 1361 1362 1363 1364 1365 1366 1367 1368 1369 Events and Trends William Langland writes Piers Plowman Categories: 1360s ... Centuries: 13th century - 14th century - 15th century Decades: 1320s 1330s 1340s 1350s 1360s - 1370s - 1380s 1390s 1400s 1410s 1420s Years: 1370 1371 1372 1373 1374 1375 1376 1377 1378 1379 Events and Trends Mamai was a powerful military commander of Golden Horde, who resided in the western part of this... Events and Trends The Western Schism continues with Pope Urban VI and Avignon Pope Clement VII each considered by some to be the Pope. ... Events and Trends 1392 Korean founder of the Joseon Dynasty General Yi Seonggye led a coup détat, overthrowing the kingdom of Goryeo and founding the kingdom of Joseon End of the reign of Emperor Go-Kameyama of Japan 1394 Expulsion of Jews from France 1395 End of reign of... Category: ... Events and Trends Categories: 1410s ... These pages contain the trends of millennia and centuries. ... (12th century - 13th century - 14th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 13th century was that century which lasted from 1201 to 1300. ... This 14th-century statue from south India depicts the gods Shiva (on the left) and Uma (on the right). ... (14th century - 15th century - 16th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 15th century was that century which lasted from 1401 to 1500. ... 1380 state leaders - Events of 1381 - 1382 state leaders - State leaders by year Africa Kano - Yaji I, Emir of Kano (1349-1385) Mali - Musa II, King of Mali (1374-1387) Asia China (Ming Dynasty) - Hongwu, Emperor of China (1368 - 1398) Japan Monarch (Northern Pretender)- Go-Enyu,Emperor of Japan... The Gregorian calendar is the most widely used calendar in the world. ... Ab urbe condita (related with Anno urbis conditae: AUC or a. ... The Armenian calendar uses the Armenian numerals. ... The Baháí calendar, also called the Badí‘ calendar, used by the Baháí Faith, is a solar calendar with regular years of 365 days, and leap years of 366 days. ... The Buddhist calendar is used on mainland southeast Asia in the countries of Cambodia, Laos, Thailand, and Myanmar (formerly Burma) in several related forms. ... The Chinese calendar is a lunisolar calendar, incorporating elements of a lunar calendar with those of a solar calendar. ... The Chinese sexagenary cycle (Chinese: ; pinyin: gānzhī) is a cyclic numeral system of 60 combinations of the two basic cycles, the ten Heavenly Stems (天干; tiāngān) and the twelve Earthly Branches (地支; dìzhī). These have been traditionally used as a means of numbering the years, not only in... The Chinese sexagenary cycle (Chinese: ; pinyin: gānzhī) is a cyclic numeral system of 60 combinations of the two basic cycles, the ten Heavenly Stems (天干; tiāngān) and the twelve Earthly Branches (地支; dìzhī). These have been traditionally used as a means of numbering the years, not only in... The Coptic calendar, also called the Alexandrian calendar, is used by the Coptic Orthodox Church. ... The Ethiopian calendar (Amharic: የኢትዮጵያ ዘመን አቆጣጠር ), also called the Geez calendar, is the principal calendar used in Ethiopia and is also the liturgical year of Christians in Eritrea belonging to the Eritrean Orthodox Tewahdo Church, Eastern Catholic Church of Eritrea and Lutheran (Evangelical Church of Eritrea), where it is commonly known... The Hebrew calendar (Hebrew: ‎) or Jewish calendar is the annual calendar used in Judaism. ... A page from the Hindu calendar 1871-72. ... There is disagreement as to the meaning of the Indian word Samvat. ... The Indian national calendar (sometimes called Saka calendar) is the official civil calendar in use in India. ... Kali Yuga is also the title of a book by Roland Charles Wagner. ... The Holocene calendar, Human Era count or Jōmon Era count (Japan) uses a dating system similar to astronomical year numbering but adds 10,000, placing a year 0 at the start of the Jōmon Era (JE), the Human Era (HE, the beginning of human civilization) and the aproximate... The Iranian calendar (Persian: ) also known as Persian calendar or the Jalāli Calendar is a solar calendar currently used in Iran and Afghanistan. ... The Islamic calendar or Muslim calendar (Arabic: التقويم الهجري; at-taqwīm al-hijrī; Persian: تقویم هجري قمری ‎ taqwīm-e hejri-ye qamari; also called the Hijri calendar) is the calendar used to date events in many predominantly Muslim countries, and used by Muslims everywhere to determine the proper day on which to celebrate... Koinobori, flags decorated like koi, are popular decorations around Childrens Day This mural on the wall of a Tokyo subway station celebrates Hazuki, the eighth month. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Japanese era name. ... The Julian calendar was introduced in 46 BC by Julius Caesar and came into force in 45 BC (709 ab urbe condita). ... The traditional Korean calendar is directly derived from the Asian calendar. ... The Thai solar, or Suriyakati (สุริยคติ), calendar is used in traditional and official contexts in Thailand, although the Western calendar is sometimes used in business. ... This is the calendar for a common year starting on Tuesday (dominical letter F), e. ... The Julian calendar was introduced in 46 BC by Julius Caesar and came into force in 45 BC (709 ab urbe condita). ...


Events

is the 163rd day of the year (164th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The end of the revolt: Wat Tyler killed by Walworth while Richard II watches, and a second image of Richard addressing the crowd The Peasants Revolt, Tyler’s Rebellion, or the Great Rising of 1381 was one of a number of popular revolts in late medieval Europe and is a... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... The Kent coat of arms For other uses, see Kent (disambiguation). ... Essex is a county in the East of England. ... Wat Tylers Death Walter Tyler, commonly known as Wat Tyler (died June 15, 1381) was the leader of the English Peasants Revolt of 1381. ... Jack Straw (probably the same person as Rackstraw) was one of the three leaders (together with John Ball and Wat Tyler) of the Peasants Revolt or Great Rising of 1381, a major event in the history of Britain. ... Blackheath is a suburb of London, divided between the London Borough of Lewisham and the London Borough of Greenwich. ... John Ball (d. ... is the 165th day of the year (166th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The end of the revolt: Wat Tyler killed by Walworth while Richard II watches, and a second image of Richard addressing the crowd The Peasants Revolt, Tyler’s Rebellion, or the Great Rising of 1381 was one of a number of popular revolts in late medieval Europe and is a... John of Gaunt, 1st Duke of Lancaster (June 24, 1340 - February 3, 1399), the third surviving son of King Edward III of England, gained his name because he was born at Ghent in 1340. ... The Savoy Palace was considered the grandest noblemans residence of medieval London, until it was destroyed in the uprising of 1381. ... For other uses, see Tower of London (disambiguation) Her Majestys Royal Palace and Fortress The Tower of London, more commonly known as the Tower of London (and historically simply as The Tower), is an historic monument in central London, England on the north bank of the River Thames. ... The Archbishop of Canterbury is the spiritual leader and senior clergyman of the Church of England, recognized by convention as the head of the worldwide Anglican Communion. ... The Lord High Chancellor of Great Britain, or Lord Chancellor and prior to the Union the Chancellor of England and the Lord Chancellor of Scotland, is a senior and important functionary in the government of the United Kingdom, and its predecessor states. ... Richard II (January 6, 1367 – February 14, 1400) was the son of Edward the Black Prince, Prince of Wales, and Joan The Fair Maid of Kent. He was born in Bordeaux and became his fathers successor when his elder brother died in infancy. ... “Serf” redirects here. ... is the 166th day of the year (167th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The end of the revolt: Wat Tyler killed by Walworth while Richard II watches, and a second image of Richard addressing the crowd The Peasants Revolt, Tyler’s Rebellion, or the Great Rising of 1381 was one of a number of popular revolts in late medieval Europe and is a... Wat Tylers Death Walter Tyler, commonly known as Wat Tyler (died June 15, 1381) was the leader of the English Peasants Revolt of 1381. ... Richard II (January 6, 1367 – February 14, 1400) was the son of Edward the Black Prince, Prince of Wales, and Joan The Fair Maid of Kent. He was born in Bordeaux and became his fathers successor when his elder brother died in infancy. ... John Gower shooting the world, a sphere of earth, air, and water (from an edition of his works c. ... An illustration from a manuscript of Vox Clamantis, showing Gower shooting the world: I throw my darts and shoot my arrows at the world. ... Froissarts Chronicle was written in French by Jean Froissart. ... Pillars of Giedymin Castle of Trakai KÄ™stutis (approximate English transcription [kæs. ... Jogaila, or WÅ‚adysÅ‚aw II JagieÅ‚Å‚o[1] (ca 1362–1434), was a Grand Duke of Lithuania and King of Poland. ... The Grand Duchy of Lithuania (Lithuanian: , Ruthenian: Wialikaje Kniastwa Litowskaje, Ruskaje, Å»amojckaje, Belarusian: , Ukrainian: , Polish: , Latin: ) was an Eastern and Central European state of the 12th[1] /13th century until the 18th century. ... Jogaila, or WÅ‚adysÅ‚aw II JagieÅ‚Å‚o[1] (ca 1362–1434), was a Grand Duke of Lithuania and King of Poland. ... Queen Joan I (1327 – May 12, 1382) was born Joanna of Anjou. ... Robert of Geneva (1342-16 September 1394) was elected to the papacy as Pope Clement VII by the French cardinals who opposed Urban VI, and was the first Avignon antipope of the Western Schism. ... Pope Urban VI (Naples c. ... For other uses see, Naples (disambiguation) and Napoli (disambiguation) Location of the city of Naples (red dot) within Italy. ... Charles III, King of Naples, also known as Charles II of Hungary and Charles of Durazzo, Charles the Short, reigned as King of Naples from 1382 to 1386 and as King of Hungary (under the name of King Károly II the Small) for one year only from 1385 to... James of Baux was the last Latin Emperor of Constantinople (1373-1383). ... The history of Taranto dates back to the 8th century BC when it was founded as a Greek colony. ... The Latin Empire, Empire of Nicaea, Empire of Trebizond and the Despotate of Epirus. ... The Principality of Achaea was one of the three vassal states of the Latin Empire which replaced the Byzantine Empire after the capture of Constantinople during the Fourth Crusade. ... Queen Joan I (1327 – May 12, 1382) was born Joanna of Anjou. ... This article is about historical/cultural Tibet. ... A Mamluk cavalryman, drawn in 1810 A mamluk (Arabic: مملوك (singular), مماليك (plural), Turkish: Kölemen, owned; also transliterated mameluk, mameluke, or mamluke) was a slave soldier who was converted to Islam and served the Muslim caliphs and the Ayyubid sultans during the Middle Ages. ... Az-Zahir Sayf ad-Din Barquq (died 1399, also spelled Berkuk, Barkuk) was the first Sultan of the Mamluk Burji dynasty. ... For other uses, see Venice (disambiguation). ... The War of Chioggia was a conflict between Genoa and Venice which lasted from 1378 to 1381, from which Venice emerged triumphant. ... For other uses, see Genoa (disambiguation). ... Statue of Timur in Shahrisabz, Uzbekistan TÄ«mÅ«r bin Taraghay Barlas (Chagatai Turkic: تیمور - TÄ“mōr, iron) (1336 – February 1405), known in the West as Tamerlane, was a 14th century warlord of Turco-Mongol descent,[1][2][3][4] conqueror of much of western and central Asia, and founder... For other uses of this term see: Persia (disambiguation) The Persian Empire is the name used to refer to a number of historic dynasties that have ruled the country of Persia (Iran). ... The Sarbadars (from sarbadar, head on gallows; also known as Sarbadalan) were a mixture of religious dervishes and secular rulers that came to rule over part of western Khurasan in the midst of the disintegration of the Mongol Ilkhanate in the mid-14th century. ...

Births

is the 129th day of the year (130th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For alternative meanings, see number 1440. ... is the 286th day of the year (287th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Thomas Fitzalan, 12th Earl of Arundel (October 13, 1381 – October 13, 1415) was an English nobleman, one of the principals of the deposition of Richard II, and a major figure during the reign of Henry IV. He was the only surviving son of Richard Fitzalan, 11th Earl of Arundel and... Events Friedrich I Hohenzollern (b. ... John I of Bourbon (1381 – 1434) was Duke of Bourbon, from 1410 to his death and Duke of Auvergne since 1416. ... Events May 30, Battle of Lipany in the Hussite Wars Jan van Eyck paints the wedding of Giovanni Arnoflini The Honorable Passing of Arms at the bridge of Obrigo The Portuguese reach Cape Bojador in Western Sahara. ... Saint Rita of Cascia Saint Rita (1381 – May 22, 1457) was born at Roccaporena near Cascia in the Diocese of Spoleto (Spoleto), Italy. ... Events University of Freiburg founded. ...

Deaths


  Results from FactBites:
 
The English Peasants' Revolt of 1381 (4128 words)
The seeds of dissent fell from the tree that was medieval society itself and were watered by the continuous oppression of the poor in towns as well as the countryside by those in power.
The merchant class and the urban industrial workers existed somewhere between the peasants and the nobles; they were free but often survived as poor day-laborers and were frequently at the mercy of the abbots, their landlords.
When he faced the Revolt in 1381, he was not quite fifteen, a boy king with indecisive advisors, no troops, and no money.
BEAM Circuits -- 1381-based type 1 SE (472 words)
The 1381 solar engine uses a 1381* voltage detector (a.k.a., a voltage supervisor) IC to drive a voltage-based (type 1) solar engine.
The 1381 is normally used to reset CPUs and Micros when the power supply drops too low for reliable operation.
The 1381 SE is designed to increase the 1381 hysteresis from 0.2 - 0.3 V to a much larger value (2 - 4.6 V).
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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