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Encyclopedia > 1282

For broader historical context, see 1280s and 13th century. The 1280s is the decade starting January 1, 1280 and ending December 31, 1289. ... (12th century - 13th century - 14th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 13th century was that century which lasted from 1201 to 1300. ...

Years:
1279 1280 1281 - 1282 - 1283 1284 1285
Decades:
1250s 1260s 1270s - 1280s - 1290s 1300s 1310s
Centuries:
12th century - 13th century - 14th century
1282 state leaders

Contents

Events Battle of Yamen. ... For broader historical context, see 1280s and 13th century. ... Events February 22 - Martin IV becomes Pope August 15 - Kamikaze storm wipes out invading Mongol army in the coast of Japan The Ottoman Empire was founded as an autonomous state (Beylik) in present day Bilecik, Turkey, by Osman Bey. ... Events June 1 - Treaty of Rheinfelden - Duke Rudolph II of Austria has to waive his right to the Duchies of Austria and Styria Teutonic Knights subjugate Prussia Sopot comes under the control of Gdańsk Gregory Cyprius becomes Patriarch of Constantinople Northern section of the Grand Canal of China is completed... // Events War and politics King Charles II of Naples is captured in a naval battle off Naples by Roger of Lauria, admiral to King Peter III of Aragon. ... Events Night watch created in Winchester, England - every householder patrols one night in turn The writ Circumspecte Agatis defines the jurisdictions of church and state in England Births Emperor Go-Nijo of Japan Pope Benedict XII Deaths March 28 - Pope Martin IV Categories: 1285 ... This is a list of decades which have articles with more information about them. ... Centuries: 12th century - 13th century - 14th century Decades: 1200s 1210s 1220s 1230s 1240s - 1250s - 1260s 1270s 1280s 1290s 1300s Years: 1250 1251 1252 1253 1254 1255 1256 1257 1258 1259 Events and Trends The great mathematician Fibonacci dies Categories: 1250s ... Centuries: 12th century - 13th century - 14th century Decades: 1210s 1220s 1230s 1240s 1250s - 1260s - 1270s 1280s 1290s 1300s 1310s Years: 1260 1261 1262 1263 1264 1265 1266 1267 1268 1269 Events and Trends Categories: 1260s ... Centuries: 12th century - 13th century - 14th century Decades: 1210s 1220s 1230s 1240s 1250s - 1260s - 1270s 1280s 1290s 1300s 1310s Years: 1270 1271 1272 1273 1274 1275 1276 1277 1278 1279 Events and Trends Categories: 1270s ... The 1280s is the decade starting January 1, 1280 and ending December 31, 1289. ... Centuries: 12th century - 13th century - 14th century Decades: 1240s 1250s 1260s 1270s 1280s - 1290s - 1300s 1310s 1320s 1330s 1340s Years: 1290 1291 1292 1293 1294 1295 1296 1297 1298 1299 Events and Trends Categories: 1290s ... Centuries: 13th century - 14th century - 15th century Decades: 1250s 1260s 1270s 1280s 1290s - 1300s - 1310s 1320s 1330s 1340s 1350s Years: 1300 1301 1302 1303 1304 1305 1306 1307 1308 1309 Events and Trends MARF Categories: 1300s ... Centuries: 13th century - 14th century - 15th century Decades: 1260s 1270s 1280s 1290s 1300s - 1310s - 1320s 1330s 1340s 1350s 1360s Years: 1310 1311 1312 1313 1314 1315 1316 1317 1318 1319 Events and Trends The Fraticelli pose a problem for the Roman Catholic church Categories: 1310s ... These pages contain the trends of millennia and centuries. ... (11th century - 12th century - 13th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 12th century was that century which lasted from 1101 to 1200. ... (12th century - 13th century - 14th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 13th century was that century which lasted from 1201 to 1300. ... This 14th-century statue from south India depicts the gods Shiva (on the left) and Uma (on the right}. It is housed in the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C. As a means of recording the passage of time, the 14th century was that century which lasted from 1301 to... 1281 state leaders - Events of 1282 - 1283 state leaders - State leaders by year Asia China (Yuan Dynasty) - Kublai Khan, Emperor of China (1260-1294, ruler of all China from 1279) Goryeo (Korea) - King Chungnyeol of Goryeo, King of Goryeo (1274 - 1308) Japan Monarch - Go-Uda, Emperor of Japan (1274-1287...


Events

War and politics

March 30 is the 89th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (90th in Leap years). ... Sicily (Sicilia in Italian) is an autonomous region of Italy and the largest island in the Mediterranean Sea, with an area of 25,700 sq. ... The Sicilian Vespers is the name given to a rebellion in Sicily, in 1282 against the rule of the Angevin king Charles I, who had taken control of the island with Papal support in 1266. ... Angevin is the name applied to three distinct medieval dynasties which originated as counts (from 1360, dukes) of the western French province of Anjou (of which angevin is the adjectival form), but later came to rule far greater areas including England, Hungary and Poland (see Angevin Empire). ... Charles I (March 1227 (or 1226) - January 7, 1285) was the posthumous (or born ten months before fathers death: sources suggest two possible birth years) son of King Louis VIII of France by Blanche of Castile. ... The Ninth Crusade is commonly considered to be the last of the medieval Crusades against the Muslims in the Holy Land. ... Map of Constantinople. ... Peter III of Aragon (Catalan: Pere) (1239 – November 11, 1285, also Peter I of Valencia, Peter II of Barcelona), known as the Great, was the king of Aragon and Valencia and count of Barcelona from 1276 to 1285. ... Excommunication is a religious censure which is used to deprive or suspend membership in a religious community. ... Martin IV, né Simon de Brion (ca. ... March is the third month of the year in the Gregorian Calendar and one of seven Gregorian months with the length of 31 days. ... Dafydd ap Gruffydd (c. ... The Badge of the Prince of Wales is derived from the ostrich feathers borne by Edward, the Black Prince. ... Arms used by Llywelyn ap Gruffydd Llywelyn ap Gruffydd or Gruffudd (c. ... Royal motto (French): Dieu et mon droit (Translated: God and my right) Englands location within the UK Official language English de facto Capital London de facto Largest city London Area - Total Ranked 1st UK 130,395 km² Population - Total (mid-2004) - Density Ranked 1st UK 50. ... National motto: Cymru am byth (Welsh: Wales for ever) Waless location within the UK Official languages English, Welsh Capital Cardiff Largest city Cardiff First Minister Rhodri Morgan Area  - Total Ranked 3rd UK 20,779 km² Population  - Total (2001)  - Density Ranked 3rd UK 2,903,085 140/km² Ethnicity: 97. ... King Edward I of England (June 17, 1239 – July 7, 1307), popularly known as Longshanks because of his 6 foot 2 inch frame and the Hammer of the Scots (his tombstone, in Latin, read, Hic est Edwardvs Primus Scottorum Malleus, Here lies Edward I, Hammer of the Scots), achieved fame... This page is about the Germanic empire. ... The brass of the tomb of Rudolph I in Speyer Rudolph I (Rudolph of Habsburg) (May 1, 1218 – July 15, 1291) was a German king, who played a vital role in raising the Habsburg family to a leading position among the royal dynasties of Germany. ... Albert I (July 1255 – May 1, 1308) was a German king, duke of Austria, and eldest son of King Rudolph I of Habsburg. ... Duke Rudolph II of Austria (born 1271, died May 10, 1290) was born as the younger son of Emperor Rudolph I of Habsburg. ... Styria was a duchy of the Holy Roman Empire until its dissolution in 1806, and a crownland of Austria-Hungary until it dissolved in 1918. ... Habsburg (sometimes spelled Hapsburg, but never so in official use) was one of the major ruling houses of Europe. ... Count Floris V of Holland (1254–1296), der Keerlen God (God of the Peasants), is one of the most important figures of the first, native dynasty of Holland (833-1299). ... Frisia (known in German and Dutch as Friesland) is a region along the southeastern coasts of the North Sea. ...

Culture and natural disasters

This Crown & CA (for Crown Agent) watermark was standard for postage stamps of the British colonies from the 1880s to the 1920s. ... Piece of paper Paper is a thin, flat material produced by the compression of fibres. ... Bologna (from Latin Bononia, Bulaggna in the local dialect) is the capital city of Emilia-Romagna in northern Italy, between the Po River and the Apennines. ... College name Hertford College Named after Elias de Hertford Established 1282 Sister College None Principal Dr John Landers JCR President Stephanie Johnston Undergraduates 376 Graduates 224 Homepage Boatclub Hertford College is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom. ... The University of Oxford, located in the city of Oxford, England, is the oldest university in the English-speaking world. ... Arms of the see of Canterbury The Archbishop of Canterbury is the senior clergyman of the established Church of England and symbolic head of the worldwide Anglican Communion. ... A synagogue or synagog (from Greek συναγωγη, transliterated sunagoge, place of assembly literally meeting, assembly) is a Jewish house of prayer and study. ... The clock tower of the Palace of Westminster, which contains Big Ben London is the capital city of the United Kingdom and of England. ... The word Jew (Hebrew: יהודי) is used in a wide number of ways, but generally refers to a follower of the Jewish faith, a child of a Jewish mother, or someone of Jewish descent with a connection to Jewish culture or ethnicity; and often a combination of these attributes. ... The Trial of the Pyx is the procedure in the United Kingdom for ensuring that newly-minted coins conform to required standards. ... A mint is a facility which manufactures coins for currency. ... This article concerns British coinage, the coinage of the United Kingdom. ... Larderello is a geologically active area of southern Tuscany, Italy, which is renowned for its geothermal productivity. ... A volcano is a geological landform (usually a mountain) where magma (rock of the Earths interior made molten or liquid by extremely high temperatures along with a reduction in pressure and/or the introduction of water or other volatiles) erupts through the surface of the planet. ... Tuscany (Italian Toscana) is a region in central Italy, bordering on Latium to the south, Umbria and Marche to the east, Emilia-Romagna and Liguria to the north, and the Tyrrhenian Sea to the west. ...

Births

June 12 is the 163rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (164th in leap years), with 202 days remaining. ... Gwenllian ferch Llywelyn (circa June 12, 1282-June 7, 1337) was the only known child of Llywelyn the Last. ... Events March 17 - Edward, the Black Prince is created Duke of Cornwall, becoming the first English Duke Beginning of the Hundred Years War between France and England Bisham Priory founded Births Louis II, Duke of Bourbon (died 1410) Jean Froissart, historian and courtier from Hainaut. ... Marguerite of France (1282 – 14 February 1317) was a daughter of Philip III of France and Maria of Brabant. ... Events The Great Famine of 1315-1317. ... Oshin of Armenia (1282-July 20, 1320) was king of the Armenian Kingdom of Cilicia, ruling from 1307 to 1320. ... Events January 20 - Duke Wladyslaw Lokietek becomes king of Poland April 6 - The Scots reaffirm their independence by signing the Declaration of Arbroath. ... Hugh V of Burgundy (1282–May 9, 1315) was Duke of Burgundy between 1306 and 1315. ... Events August 13 - Louis X of France marries Clemence dAnjou. ... Maud de Chaworth, Countess of Leicester (1282-1322), was the daughter of Patrick de Chaworth and Isabel Beauchamp, daughter of William Beauchamp and Maud Fitz-John. ... Events September 27/September 28 - Battle of Ampfing, often called the last battle of knights, in which Louis IV, Holy Roman Emperor defeats Frederick I of Austria Births Emperor Komyo of Japan, second of the Northern Ashikaga Pretenders Deaths January 3 - France Categories: 1322 ... Marguerite of France was the name of two female members of the Capetian dynasty which ruled France in the Middle Ages. ... King George V of the United Kingdom and his consort, Queen Mary A queen consort is the wife and consort of a reigning king. ... Royal motto (French): Dieu et mon droit (Translated: God and my right) Englands location within the UK Official language English de facto Capital London de facto Largest city London Area - Total Ranked 1st UK 130,395 km² Population - Total (mid-2004) - Density Ranked 1st UK 50. ... Events The Great Famine of 1315-1317. ... Innocent VI, né Stephen Aubert (1282 – September 12, 1362), pope at Avignon from 1352 to 1362, the successor of Clement VI, was a native of the diocese of Limoges, and, after having taught civil law at Toulouse, became bishop successively of Noyon and of Clermont. ... Centuries: 13th century - 14th century - 15th century Decades: 1310s 1320s 1330s 1340s 1350s - 1360s - 1370s 1380s 1390s 1400s 1410s Years: 1357 1358 1359 1360 1361 - 1362 - 1363 1364 1365 1366 1367 See also: 1362 state leaders Events Under Edward III, English replaces French as Englands national language, for the... Frederick IV (1282 - April 21, 1329, in Paris) was Duke of Lorraine from 1312 to his death. ... Events Antipope Nicholas V is excommunicated by Pope John XXII. Aimone of Savoy becomes Count of Savoy. ... Louis IV of Bavaria of the House of Wittelsbach (born 1282) was duke of Bavaria from 1294, duke of the Palatinate from 1329 and, after 1314, Holy Roman Emperor. ... -1... Pierre Maury (born 1282 or 1283) was a shepherd in the Comté de Foix notable for appearing in Emmanuel Le Roy Laduries Montaillou. ... Cathars being expelled from Carcassone in 1209. ...

Deaths


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RFC 1282 (rfc1282) (1198 words)
The first is an empty string (i.e., it consists solely of a single zero byte), followed by three non-null strings: the client username, the server username, and the terminal type and speed.
The server returns a zero byte to indicate that it has received these Kantor [Page 1] RFC 1282 BSD Rlogin December 1991 strings and is now in data transfer mode.
Kantor [Page 2] RFC 1282 BSD Rlogin December 1991 From Server to Client Data from the remote server is sent to the client as a stream of characters.
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