FACTOID # 23: Wisconsin has more metal fabricators per capita than any other state.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
RELATED ARTICLES
People who viewed "1270s" also viewed:
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > 1270s
Centuries:
12th century - 13th century - 14th century
Decades:

1230s 1240s 1250s - 1260s - 1270s 1280s 1290s These pages contain the trends of millennia and centuries. ... (11th century - 12th century - 13th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 12th century was that century which lasted from 1101 to 1200. ... (12th century - 13th century - 14th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 13th century was that century which lasted from 1201 to 1300. ... This 14th-century statue from south India depicts the gods Shiva (on the left) and Uma (on the right). ... This is a list of decades which have articles with more information about them. ... Centuries: 12th century - 13th century - 14th century Decades: 1180s 1190s 1200s 1210s 1220s - 1230s - 1240s 1250s 1260s 1270s 1280s Years: 1230 1231 1232 1233 1234 1235 1236 1237 1238 1239 Events and Trends Categories: 1230s ... Centuries: 12th century - 13th century - 14th century Decades: 1190s 1200s 1210s 1220s 1230s - 1240s - 1250s 1260s 1270s 1280s 1290s Years: 1240 1241 1242 1243 1244 1245 1246 1247 1248 1249 Events and Trends Hungary was partially demolished with a great loss of life in 1241–1242 by Mongol armies of... The 1250s is the decade starting January 1, 1250 and ending December 31, 1259. ... The 1260s is the decade starting January 1, 1260 and ending December 31, 1269. ... The 1280s is the decade starting January 1, 1280 and ending December 31, 1289. ... Centuries: 12th century - 13th century - 14th century Decades: 1240s 1250s 1260s 1270s 1280s - 1290s - 1300s 1310s 1320s 1330s 1340s Years: 1290 1291 1292 1293 1294 1295 1296 1297 1298 1299 Events and Trends Categories: 1290s ...

Years:

1270 1271 1272 1273 1274 1275 1276 1277 1278 1279 For broader historical context, see 1270s and 13th century. ... For broader historical context, see 1270s and 13th century. ... For broader historical context, see 1270s and 13th century. ... For broader historical context, see 1270s and 13th century. ... Events May 7 - In France the Second Council of Lyons opens to consider the condition of the Holy Land and to agree to a union with the Byzantine church. ... Events Eleanor de Montfort is captured by pirates in the employ of Edward I of England to prevent her marriage to Llywelyn the Last, prince of Jews over the age of 7 to wear the yellow badge and makes usury illegal Jean de Meun writes the second portion of the... For broader historical context, see 1270s and 13th century. ... Events The philosophical doctrine Averroism is banned from Paris by bishop Etienne Tempier Burmas Pagan empire begins to disintegrate after being defeated by Kublai Khan at Ngasaungsyan, near the Chinese border. ... For broader historical context, see 1270s and 13th century. ... For broader historical context, see 1270s and 13th century. ...

The 1270s is the decade starting January 1, 1270, and ending December 31, 1279.


In Europe, power struggles within the Holy Roman Empire escalated into civil war as the 23-year interregnum without an emperor came to an end. Election of Rudolph I of Germany as King of Germany over Otakar II of Bohemia in 1273 led to open war in 1276 and Otakar's death in 1278 at the climactic Battle of Marchfeld. The resultant power structure in central Europe firmly established the Habsburg dynasty's rule, one that would continue Austria and other reginal territories until the end of World War I in 1918. On the British Isles, King Edward I of England returned from the Eighth Crusade to take the throne and was able to subjugate Wales by the end of the decade; Scotland quelled an uprising on the Isle of Man, in doing so confirming the concession of that territory made in 1266 by Norway in the Treaty of Perth. The Statutes of Westminster established a series of individuals' rights in England. Both the Eighth Crusade and Ninth Crusade were brief efforts that quickly ended in failure, with King Louis IX of France dying during the former. World map showing Europe Europe is one of the seven continents of Earth which, in this case, is more a cultural and political distinction than a physiographic one, leading to various perspectives about Europes borders. ... The Holy Roman Empire and from the 16th century on also The Holy Roman Empire of the German Nation was a political conglomeration of lands in Central Europe in the Middle Ages and the early modern period. ... An interregnum is a period between monarchs, between popes of the Roman Catholic Church, emperors of Holy Roman Empire, polish kings (elective monarchy) or between consuls of the Roman Republic. ... The brass of the tomb of Rudolph I in Speyer Rudolph I (Rudolph of Habsburg) (May 1, 1218 – July 15, 1291) was a German king, who played a vital role in raising the Habsburg family to a leading position among the royal dynasties of Germany. ... The following list of German Kings and Emperors is one of several Wikipedia lists of incumbents. ... Otakar II (also spelled Ottokar or PÅ™emysl Otakar/Ottokar) (c. ... The Battle on the Marchfeld (Morava Field) at Dürnkrut and Jedenspeigen took place on August 26, 1278 and was a decisive event for the history of Central Europe for the following centuries. ... Flag of the Habsburg Monarchy; also used as the flag of the Austrian Empire until the Ausgleich of 1867. ... Combatants Allies: Serbia, Russia, France, Romania, Belgium, British Empire, United States, Italy, and others Central Powers: Germany, Austria-Hungary, Bulgaria, Ottoman Empire Casualties Military dead: 5 million Civilian deaths: 3 million Total of dead: 8 million Military dead: 4 million Civilian deaths: 3 million Total dead: 7 million The First... 1918 (MCMXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. ... The British Isles consist of Great Britain, Ireland (usually) and a number of much smaller surrounding islands. ... Edward I (June 17, 1239–July 7, 1307), popularly known as Longshanks because of his 6 foot 2 inch (1. ... The Eighth Crusade was a crusade launched by Louis IX of France, (who was by now in his mid-fifties) in 1270. ... For an explanation of often confusing terms such as Great Britain, Britain, United Kingdom, England and Wales and England, see British Isles (terminology). ... For broader historical context, see 1260s and 13th century. ... The Treaty of Perth ended military conflict between Norway under Magnus the Law-mender and Scotland under Alexander III over the sovereignty of the Western Isles, the Isle of Mann and Caithness. ... This article deals with the Statutes of Westminster passed in thirteenth century. ... Royal motto (French): Dieu et mon droit (Translated: God and my right) Englands location (dark green) within the United Kingdom (light green), with the Republic of Ireland (blue) to its west Languages English Capital London Largest city London Area – Total Ranked 1st UK 130,395 km² Population – Total (mid... The Eighth Crusade was a crusade launched by Louis IX of France, (who was by now in his mid-fifties) in 1270. ... // Summary The Ninth Crusade which is sometimes grouped with the Eighth Crusade, is commonly considered to be the last of the medieval Crusades to defend Christianity from the Muslims in the Holy Land. ... Only representation of Saint Louis known to be true to life - Early 14th century statue from the church of Mainneville, Eure, France King Louis IX of France or Saint Louis (April 25, 1214/1215 – August 25, 1270) was King of France from 1226 until his death. ...


The Mongol Empire continued its expansion to the east, conquering the Song Dynasty of China by the end of the decade and subjugating most of continental Asia. The conquest of China witnessed the first use of firearms in war. Kublai Khan moved his capital to present-day Beijing and renamed his empire the Yuan Dynasty, reflecting the new eastward focus of the empire. The western Ilkhanate established a capital at Tabriz, in present-day Iran. The Mongols were able to quell the Sambyeolcho Rebellion in Korea and defeat the Nakhi and Pagan Empires, but failed an attempted invasion of Japan in 1274. Marco Polo reached Kublai Khan's summer court by 1275, and stayed with the court for over 20 years. Mongol Empires largest extent coloured in blue. ... The Song Dynasty (Chinese: 宋朝) was a ruling dynasty in China from 960-1279. ... World map showing the location of Asia. ... An assortment of modern handheld firearms using fixed ammunition, including military assault rifles, a sporting shotgun (fourth from bottom), and a tactical shotgun (third from bottom). ... Kublai Khan, Khubilai Khan or the last of the Great Khans (September 23, [[1215] - February 18, 1294) (Mongolian: Хубилай хаан, Chinese: 忽必烈, also spelled as Kubilay Han in Turkic), was a Mongol military leader. ... Beijing (Chinese: 北京; Pinyin: Běijīng; ; IPA: ), a city in northern China (formerly spelled in English as Peking or Peiking), is the capital of the Peoples Republic of China (PRC). ... The Yuan Dynasty (Chinese: 元朝; pinyin: Yuáncháo; Mongolian: Dai Ön Yeke Mongghul Ulus) lasting officially from 1271 to 1368, occasionally known as the Mongol Dynasty. ... Khanates of Mongolian Empire: Il-Khanate, Chagatai Khanate, Empire of the Great Khan (Yuan Dynasty), Golden Horde The Ilkhanate (also spelled Il-khanate or Il Khanate) was one of the four divisions within the Mongol Empire. ... Tabriz City Hall, built in 1895, by Arfaol molk, with the aid of German engineers. ... The Sambyeolcho Rebellion (1270-1273) was a Korean rebellion against the Goryeo Dynasty during the Mongol invasion. ... Korea (Korean: (조선 or 한국, see below) is a civilization and geographical area situated on the Korean Peninsula in East Asia, bordering China to the northwest and Russia to the northeast, with Japan situated to the southeast across the Korea Strait. ... Categories: Ethnic groups of China ... Pagan (also known as Bagan) was an important ancient kingdom in Myanmar. ... Marco Polo (September 15, 1254, Curzola, Dalmatia — January 8, 1324, Venice, Italy) was a Venetian trader and explorer who, together with his father Niccolò and his uncle Maffeo, was one of the first Westerners to travel the Silk Road to China (which he called Cathay) and visited the Great Khan...


The Mamluk sultanate of Egypt continued to expand its territory and dodge two crusades -- the Eighth Crusade never reached its intended target, and the Ninth rapidly became a failure. The sultan Baibars was successful in expanding his territory as far north as the Sultanate of Rüm in Anatolia, east into Syria, and south into Makurian Nubia. After Baibars died in 1277, his successor Qalawun continued expansionist policies. An Ottoman Mamluk, from 1810 A mamluk (Arabic: مملوك (singular), مماليك (plural), owned; also transliterated mameluk, mameluke, or mamluke) was a slave soldier who converted to Islam and served the Muslim caliphs and the Ottoman Empire during the Middle Ages. ... The Eighth Crusade was a crusade launched by Louis IX of France, (who was by now in his mid-fifties) in 1270. ... // Summary The Ninth Crusade which is sometimes grouped with the Eighth Crusade, is commonly considered to be the last of the medieval Crusades to defend Christianity from the Muslims in the Holy Land. ... al-Malik al-Zahir Rukn al-Din Baibars al-Bunduqdari (also spelled Baybars) (Arabic: ) [1] was a Mamluk Sultan of Egypt and Syria. ... The Sultanate of Rûm was a Seljuk sultanate in Anatolia from 1077 to 1307. ... Asia Minor lies east of the Bosporus, between the Black Sea and the Mediterranean. ... Christian Nubia in the three states period. ... Today Nubia is the region in the south of Egypt, along the Nile and in northern Sudan, but in ancient times it was an independent kingdom. ... Saif ad-Din Qalawun al-Alfi al-Mansur (also Qalaun or Kalavun) (c. ...


European culture witnessed the arrival of several important scientific works in translation from centuries-old Arabic sources, including Alhazen's work on optics and Al-Razi's medical works. The two major surveys of the English census known as the Hundred Rolls were conducted. Thomas Aquinas completed his seminal work Summa Theologiae late in 1273, and died in 1274. Leadership of the Catholic Church attempted to address the East-West Schism of the church through the Second Council of Lyons, but despite apparent success the effort was ultimately doomed to fail. In Japan, Nichiren continued to lead a life that would come to be revered in Nichiren Buddhism. Alhazen Abu Ali al-Hasan Ibn Al-Haitham (also: Ibn al Haitham) (965-1040) (Arabic: أبو علي الحسن بن الهيثم) was an Arab Muslim mathematician; he is sometimes called al-Basri (Arabic: البصري), after his birthplace Basra, Arab Islamic Caliphate (now Iraq). ... Colophon of al-Razis Book of Medicine Al-Razi, (full name Abū Bakr Muhammad Ibn Zakarīya al-Rāzi, in Persian زكريای رازی Zakaria ye Razi, in Arabic ابو بکر محمد بن زكريا الرازی), and also Zakaria al-Razi in Arabic; or in Latin as Rhazes and Rasis. ... Royal motto (French): Dieu et mon droit (Translated: God and my right) Englands location (dark green) within the United Kingdom (light green), with the Republic of Ireland (blue) to its west Languages English Capital London Largest city London Area – Total Ranked 1st UK 130,395 km² Population – Total (mid... 1870 US Census for New York City A census is the process of obtaining information about every member of a population (not necessarily a human population). ... The Hundred Rolls are a census of England and parts of what is now Wales taken in the late thirteenth century. ... Saint Thomas Aquinas [Thomas of Aquin, or Aquino] (c. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Catholicism. ... Great Schism redirects here. ... The Second Council of Lyon was a Roman Catholic council convened in Lyon in 1274. ... Nichiren (日蓮) (February 16, 1222 – October 13, 1282), born Zennichimaro (善日麿), later Zeshō-bō Renchō (是生房蓮長), and finally Nichiren (日蓮), was a Buddhist monk of 13th century Japan. ... Nichiren Buddhism (日蓮系諸宗派: Nichiren-kei sho shūha) is a branch of Buddhism based on the teachings of the 13th century Japanese monk Nichiren (1222–1282). ...


In North America, a severe 23-year drought began in the Grand Canyon area, which would eventually force the local Anasazi people to emigrate from the region. World map showing North America A satellite composite image of North America. ... The known history of the Grand Canyon area stretches back 10,500 years when the first evidence for human presence in the area started. ... Ancient Pueblo People, or Ancestral Puebloans is the preferred term for the group of peoples often known as Anasazi who are the ancestors of the modern Pueblo peoples. ...

Contents


War and politics

Europe

War and peace

July 2 is the 183rd day of the year (184th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 182 days remaining. ... Otakar II (also spelled Ottokar or PÅ™emysl Otakar/Ottokar) (c. ... King Stephen V of Hungary (Hungarian: ,Slovak: Štefan V)(1239 or 1240 - August 6, 1272), was the eldest son of Bela IV of Hungary, whom he succeeded in 1270. ... The Peace of Pressburg (also called Peace of Bratislava) is the name of 4 peace agreements concluded in the present-day town of Bratislava. ... Charles I (March 1227 - January 7, 1285) was the posthumous son of King Louis VIII of France, created Count of Anjou by his elder brother King Louis IX in 1246, thus founding the second Angevin dynasty. ... Naples (Italian Napoli, Neapolitan Nàpule, from Greek Νέα Πόλις - Néa Pólis - meaning New City; see also List of traditional Greek place names) is the largest city in southern Italy and capital of Campania Region and the Province of Naples. ... Durrës (Photo by Marc Morell) Durrës (Albanian: Durrës or Durrësi) is the most ancient city of Albania and one of the most economically important as the biggest port city. ... Afonso III of Portugal (the Burgundian), fifth king of Portugal, was born in Coimbra in May 5, 1210 and died in February 16, 1279, in the same city. ... Copyrighted Image Photo courtesy of Wayne B. Chandler Moorish Ambassador to Queen Elizabeth I The Moors were the medieval Muslim inhabitants of al-Andalus (the Iberian Peninsula including the present day Spain and Portugal) and the Maghreb and western Africa, whose culture is often called Moorish. ... Wall entrance City Hall The Hermitage of Nossa Senhora do Pé da Cruz Statue of King Afonso III Governo Civil Igreja da Sé (main church) Faros Island Faros Marina The old mercy/church and hospital in Faro Faro is both a city and a district in southern Portugal. ... September 29 is the 272nd day of the year (273rd in leap years). ... The brass of the tomb of Rudolph I in Speyer Rudolph I (Rudolph of Habsburg) (May 1, 1218 – July 15, 1291) was a German king, who played a vital role in raising the Habsburg family to a leading position among the royal dynasties of Germany. ... The following list of German Kings and Emperors is one of several Wikipedia lists of incumbents. ... Otakar II (also spelled Ottokar or PÅ™emysl Otakar/Ottokar) (c. ... For broader historical context, see 1270s and 13th century. ... Flag of the Habsburg Monarchy; also used as the flag of the Austrian Empire until the Ausgleich of 1867. ... Otakar II (also spelled Ottokar or PÅ™emysl Otakar/Ottokar) (c. ... Bratislava is the capital of Slovakia and the countrys largest city, with a population of some 450,000. ... Nuremberg (German: Nürnberg) is a city in the German state of Bavaria, in the administrative region of Middle Franconia. ... Frederick II (December 26, 1194 – December 13, 1250), Holy Roman Emperor of the Hohenstaufen dynasty, was pretender to the title of King of the Romans from 1212, unopposed holder of that monarchy from 1215, and Holy Roman Emperor from 1220 until his death in 1250. ... The brass of the tomb of Rudolph I in Speyer Rudolph I (Rudolph of Habsburg) (May 1, 1218 – July 15, 1291) was a German king, who played a vital role in raising the Habsburg family to a leading position among the royal dynasties of Germany. ... Otakar II (also spelled Ottokar or PÅ™emysl Otakar/Ottokar) (c. ... Eleanor de Montfort (1252–June 1282) was the only daughter of Simon de Montfort, 6th Earl of Leicester, and became the last princess of Wales before the English Conquest in 1283. ... Edward I (June 17, 1239–July 7, 1307), popularly known as Longshanks because of his 6 foot 2 inch (1. ... Arms used by Llywelyn ap Gruffydd Llywelyn ap Gruffydd or Gruffudd (in Welsh, he is remembered by the alliterative soubriquet Llywelyn Ein Llyw Olaf - Llywelyn, Our Last Leader; c. ... For an explanation of often confusing terms such as Great Britain, Britain, United Kingdom, England and Wales and England, see British Isles (terminology). ... Motto: Nemo me impune lacessit (English: No one provokes me with impunity) Scotlands location within Europe Scotlands location within the United Kingdom Languages English, Gaelic, Scots Capital Edinburgh Largest city Glasgow First Minister Jack McConnell Area - Total - % water Ranked 2nd UK 78,782 km² 1. ... The brass of the tomb of Rudolph I in Speyer Rudolph I (Rudolph of Habsburg) (May 1, 1218 – July 15, 1291) was a German king, who played a vital role in raising the Habsburg family to a leading position among the royal dynasties of Germany. ... Otakar II (also spelled Ottokar or PÅ™emysl Otakar/Ottokar) (c. ... In politics, a Diet is a formal deliberative assembly. ... Nuremberg (German: Nürnberg) is a city in the German state of Bavaria, in the administrative region of Middle Franconia. ... Events May 7 - In France the Second Council of Lyons opens to consider the condition of the Holy Land and to agree to a union with the Byzantine church. ... The Pope (from Greek: pappas, father; from Latin: papa, Papa, father) is the head of the Roman Catholic Church. ... Gregory X, né Theobald Visconti (Piacenza, ca. ... Innocent V, né Pierre de Tarentaise (Hamlet of Friburge - Champagny en Vanoise, Savoy, ca. ... Adrian V (also known as Hadrian V), né Ottobuono de Fieschi (c. ... Arms used by Llywelyn ap Gruffydd Llywelyn ap Gruffydd or Gruffudd (in Welsh, he is remembered by the alliterative soubriquet Llywelyn Ein Llyw Olaf - Llywelyn, Our Last Leader; c. ... Edward I (June 17, 1239–July 7, 1307), popularly known as Longshanks because of his 6 foot 2 inch (1. ... August 26 is the 238th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (239th in leap years). ... The brass of the tomb of Rudolph I in Speyer Rudolph I (Rudolph of Habsburg) (May 1, 1218 – July 15, 1291) was a German king, who played a vital role in raising the Habsburg family to a leading position among the royal dynasties of Germany. ... Ladislaus IV the Cuman (Hungarian: IV László, Slovak: Ladislav IV) (1262 – July 10, 1290), also known as Laszlo IV, king of Hungary, was the son of Stephen V, whom he succeeded in 1272. ... Otakar II (also spelled Ottokar or PÅ™emysl Otakar/Ottokar) (c. ... The Battle on the Marchfeld (Morava Field) at Dürnkrut and Jedenspeigen took place on August 26, 1278 and was a decisive event for the history of Central Europe for the following centuries. ... The silver Anglia knight, commissioned as a trophy in 1850, intended to represent the Black Prince. ... The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times, beginning with the Renaissance. ... World map showing Europe Europe is one of the seven continents of Earth which, in this case, is more a cultural and political distinction than a physiographic one, leading to various perspectives about Europes borders. ... Flag of the Habsburg Monarchy; also used as the flag of the Austrian Empire until the Ausgleich of 1867. ... Combatants Allies: Serbia, Russia, France, Romania, Belgium, British Empire, United States, Italy, and others Central Powers: Germany, Austria-Hungary, Bulgaria, Ottoman Empire Casualties Military dead: 5 million Civilian deaths: 3 million Total of dead: 8 million Military dead: 4 million Civilian deaths: 3 million Total dead: 7 million The First... 1918 (MCMXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. ...

Political entities

The Capitole, the 18th century city hall of Toulouse and best known landmark in the city; in the foreground is the Place du Capitole, a hub of urban life at the very center of the city Toulouse (pronounced in standard French, and in local Toulouse accent) (Occitan: Tolosa, pronounced ) is... City flag City coat of arms Coordinates : , Time Zone : CET (GMT +1) Administration Département Bas-Rhin (67) Région Alsace Mayor Fabienne Keller (UMP) (since 2001) Intercommunality Urban Community of Strasbourg City (commune) Characteristics Land Area 78. ... In the Holy Roman Empire, an imperial free city (in German: freie Reichsstadt) was a city formally responsible to the emperor only — as opposed to the majority of cities in the Empire, which belonged to a territory and were thus governed by one of the many princes (Fürsten) of... The Holy Roman Empire and from the 16th century on also The Holy Roman Empire of the German Nation was a political conglomeration of lands in Central Europe in the Middle Ages and the early modern period. ... March 9 is the 68th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (69th in Leap years). ... Augsburg is a city in south-central Germany. ... In the Holy Roman Empire, an imperial free city (in German: freie Reichsstadt) was a city formally responsible to the emperor only — as opposed to the majority of cities in the Empire, which belonged to a territory and were thus governed by one of the many princes (Fürsten) of... Ravensburg, Blaserturm (Trumpeters Tower), Waaghaus (Balance Hall) and Rathaus (Town Hall) Ravensburg is a town in Upper Swabia in Southern Germany, capital of the district of Ravensburg, Baden-Württemberg. ... The Bishop of Urgell is the Roman Catholic bishop for Urgell in Catalonia, Spain and also the ex officio Co-Prince of Andorra. ... County of Foix coat of arms The independent counts of Foix, with their castle overlooking the town of Foix, now in southernmost France, governed their county of Foix, which corresponded roughly to the eastern part of the modern département of Ariège (the western part being Couserans). ...

Political reform

September 1 is the 244th day of the year (245th in leap years). ... Gregory X, né Theobald Visconti (Piacenza, ca. ... A cardinal is an official of the second-highest rank of the Roman Catholic Church, inferior in rank only to the Pope. ... con·clave (knklv, kng-) n. ... Gregory X, né Theobald Visconti (Piacenza, ca. ... con·clave (knklv, kng-) n. ... The Sistine Chapel is the location of the conclave. ... April 22 is the 112th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (113th in leap years). ... This article deals with the Statutes of Westminster passed in thirteenth century. ... Royal motto (French): Dieu et mon droit (Translated: God and my right) Englands location (dark green) within the United Kingdom (light green), with the Republic of Ireland (blue) to its west Languages English Capital London Largest city London Area – Total Ranked 1st UK 130,395 km² Population – Total (mid... States currently utilizing parliamentary systems are denoted in orange and red—the former being constitutional monarchies where authority is vested in a parliament, and the latter being parliamentary republics whose parliaments are effectively supreme over a separate head of state. ... The word bail as a legal term means: Security, usually a sum of money, exchanged for the release of an arrested person as a guarantee of that persons appearance for trial. ... The Statute of Mortmain were two enactments, in 1279 and 1290 by King Edward I of England aimed at preserving the kingdoms revenues by preventing land from passing into the possession of the Church. ... Edward I (June 17, 1239–July 7, 1307), popularly known as Longshanks because of his 6 foot 2 inch (1. ...

Asia and Africa

Mongol Empire sphere of influence

Korea (Korean: (ì¡°ì„  or 한국, see below) is a civilization and geographical area situated on the Korean Peninsula in East Asia, bordering China to the northwest and Russia to the northeast, with Japan situated to the southeast across the Korea Strait. ... The Sambyeolcho Rebellion (1270-1273) was a Korean rebellion against the Goryeo Dynasty during the Mongol invasion. ... The Goryeo kingdom ruled Korea from the fall of Silla in 935 until the founding of Joseon in 1392. ... A puppet state is a state whose government, though notionally of the same culture as the governed people - owes its existence (or other major debt) to being installed, supported or controlled by a more powerful entity, typically a foreign power. ... Mongol Empires largest extent coloured in blue. ... Tabriz City Hall, built in 1895, by Arfaol molk, with the aid of German engineers. ... Mongol Empires largest extent coloured in blue. ... Khanates of Mongolian Empire: Il-Khanate, Chagatai Khanate, Empire of the Great Khan (Yuan Dynasty), Golden Horde The Ilkhanate (also spelled Il-khanate or Il Khanate) was one of the four divisions within the Mongol Empire. ... December 18 is the 352nd day of the year (353rd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... Kublai Khan, Khubilai Khan or the last of the Great Khans (September 23, [[1215] - February 18, 1294) (Mongolian: Хубилай хаан, Chinese: 忽必烈, also spelled as Kubilay Han in Turkic), was a Mongol military leader. ... The Yuan Dynasty (Chinese: 元朝; pinyin: Yuáncháo; Mongolian: Dai Ön Yeke Mongghul Ulus) lasting officially from 1271 to 1368, occasionally known as the Mongol Dynasty. ... Categories: Ethnic groups of China ... Perspective view of the Himalaya and Mount Everest as seen from space looking south-south-east from over the Tibetan Plateau. ... Mongol Empires largest extent coloured in blue. ... The Yuan Dynasty (Chinese: 元朝; pinyin: Yuáncháo; Mongolian: Dai Ön Yeke Mongghul Ulus) lasting officially from 1271 to 1368, occasionally known as the Mongol Dynasty. ... January 31 is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Battle of Xiangyang was a six-year battle consisting of skirmishes, ground assault, and the siege of the twin fortified cities of Fancheng and Xiangyang in modern-day Hubei, China, starting in AD 1268. ... The Song Dynasty (Chinese: 宋朝) was a ruling dynasty in China from 960-1279. ... Kublai Khan, Khubilai Khan or the last of the Great Khans (September 23, [[1215] - February 18, 1294) (Mongolian: Хубилай хаан, Chinese: 忽必烈, also spelled as Kubilay Han in Turkic), was a Mongol military leader. ... Korea (Korean: (ì¡°ì„  or 한국, see below) is a civilization and geographical area situated on the Korean Peninsula in East Asia, bordering China to the northwest and Russia to the northeast, with Japan situated to the southeast across the Korea Strait. ... The Sambyeolcho Rebellion (1270-1273) was a Korean rebellion against the Goryeo Dynasty during the Mongol invasion. ... The Goryeo kingdom ruled Korea from the fall of Silla in 935 until the founding of Joseon in 1392. ... A puppet state is a state whose government, though notionally of the same culture as the governed people - owes its existence (or other major debt) to being installed, supported or controlled by a more powerful entity, typically a foreign power. ... Mongol Empires largest extent coloured in blue. ... November 20 is the 324th day of the year (325th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... Mongol Empires largest extent coloured in blue. ... Battle of Bunei Conflict Mongol Invasions of Japan Date November 20, 1274 Place Hakata Bay, near present-day Fukuoka, Kyushu Result Invasion fails. ... Lt. ... Raijin surrounded by drums to make thunder. ... Mongol Empires largest extent coloured in blue. ... Suzhou (Simplified Chinese: 苏州; Traditional Chinese: 蘇州; Pinyin: SÅ«zhōu; Wade-Giles: Su-chou; sometimes seen transliterated as Su-chow, Suchow, or Soochow) is a famous city on the lower reaches of the Yangtze River and on the shores of Lake Taihu in the province of Jiangsu, China. ... Marco Polo (September 15, 1254, Curzola, Dalmatia — January 8, 1324, Venice, Italy) was a Venetian trader and explorer who, together with his father Niccolò and his uncle Maffeo, was one of the first Westerners to travel the Silk Road to China (which he called Cathay) and visited the Great Khan... Xanadu, Zanadu, or Shangdu (Chinese: 上都; Pinyin: ShàngdÅ«) was the summer capital of Kublai Khans Mongol Empire, which covered much of Asia. ... Kublai Khan, Khubilai Khan or the last of the Great Khans (September 23, [[1215] - February 18, 1294) (Mongolian: Хубилай хаан, Chinese: 忽必烈, also spelled as Kubilay Han in Turkic), was a Mongol military leader. ... Mongol Empires largest extent coloured in blue. ... Kunming (Chinese: 昆明; Hanyu Pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Kun-ming) is the capital of Yunnan province, China with a population estimated on 1,055. ... Yunnan (Simplified Chinese: 云南; Traditional Chinese: 雲南; Hanyu pinyin: ) is a province of the Peoples Republic of China, located in the far southwestern corner of the country. ... Mongol Empires largest extent coloured in blue. ... The Yuan Dynasty (Chinese: 元朝; pinyin: Yuáncháo; Mongolian: Dai Ön Yeke Mongghul Ulus) lasting officially from 1271 to 1368, occasionally known as the Mongol Dynasty. ... This article refers to the medieval Turkic state. ... The Song Dynasty (Chinese: 宋朝) was a ruling dynasty in China from 960-1279. ... Hangzhou (Chinese: 杭州; Pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Hang-chou) is a sub-provincial city in China, and the capital of Zhejiang province. ... Fujian (Chinese: 福建; Hanyu Pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Fu-chien; Postal System Pinyin: Fukien, Foukien; local transliteration Hokkien from Min Nan Hok-kiàn) is one of the provinces on the southeast coast of China. ... Guangdong (Simplified Chinese: 广东; Traditional Chinese: 廣東; Pinyin: GuÇŽngdōng; Wade-Giles: Kuang-tung; Postal System Pinyin: Kwangtung or Canton Province, Jyutping: gwong2 dung1), is a province on the south coast of the Peoples Republic of China. ... Mongol Empires largest extent coloured in blue. ... Pagan (also known as Bagan) was an important ancient kingdom in Myanmar. ... Kublai Khan, Khubilai Khan or the last of the Great Khans (September 23, [[1215] - February 18, 1294) (Mongolian: Хубилай хаан, Chinese: 忽必烈, also spelled as Kubilay Han in Turkic), was a Mongol military leader. ... The Battle of Ngasaunggyan was fought in 1277 between Kublai Khans Mongol Yuan Dynasty of China, and their neighbors to the south, the Pagan Empire (in present-day Myanmar) led by Narathihapate. ... Yunnan (Simplified Chinese: 云南; Traditional Chinese: 雲南; Hanyu pinyin: ) is a province of the Peoples Republic of China, located in the far southwestern corner of the country. ... Alternative meaning: Song Dynasty (420-479) The Song dynasty (Chinese: 宋朝) was a ruling dynasty in China from 960-1279. ... Mongol Empires largest extent coloured in blue. ... Fukuoka City Hall Mayor Hirotaro Yamasaki Address 〒810-8620 Fukuoka-shi, Chuo-ku, Tenjin 1-8-1 Phone number 092-711-4111 Official website: Fukuoka City Fukuoka (福岡市; -shi) is the capital city of Fukuoka Prefecture and is situated on the northern shore of the island of Kyushu in Japan, across... Mongol Empires largest extent coloured in blue. ... March 19 is the 78th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (79th in leap years). ... Kublai Khan, Khubilai Khan or the last of the Great Khans (September 23, [[1215] - February 18, 1294) (Mongolian: Хубилай хаан, Chinese: 忽必烈, also spelled as Kubilay Han in Turkic), was a Mongol military leader. ... Honorary guard of Mongolia. ... The Yuan Dynasty (Chinese: 元朝; pinyin: Yuáncháo; Mongolian: Dai Ön Yeke Mongghul Ulus) lasting officially from 1271 to 1368, occasionally known as the Mongol Dynasty. ... The Song Dynasty (Chinese: 宋朝) was a ruling dynasty in China from 960-1279. ... Combatants Song Dynasty Yuan Dynasty Commanders Zhang Shijie Zhang Hongfan Strength 200,000 1000+ warships 20,000 50+ warships Casualties unknown, though almost all perished unknown The Battle of Yamen (崖門戰役; or 崖山海戰, lit. ... Mongol Empires largest extent coloured in blue. ... Kublai Khan, Khubilai Khan or the last of the Great Khans (September 23, [[1215] - February 18, 1294) (Mongolian: Хубилай хаан, Chinese: 忽必烈, also spelled as Kubilay Han in Turkic), was a Mongol military leader. ... Hojo Tokimune (北条 時宗, 1251 - 1284) was the eighth shikken (regent) of the Kamakura shogunate (reigned 1268 - 84), best known for leading the Japanese forces against the invasion of the Mongols. ... For broader historical context, see 1280s and 13th century. ...

Mamluk Sultanate of Egypt sphere of influence

The Eighth Crusade was a crusade launched by Louis IX of France, (who was by now in his mid-fifties) in 1270. ... Only representation of Saint Louis known to be true to life - Early 14th century statue from the church of Mainneville, Eure, France King Louis IX of France or Saint Louis (April 25, 1214/1215 – August 25, 1270) was King of France from 1226 until his death. ... The Eighth Crusade was a crusade launched by Louis IX of France, (who was by now in his mid-fifties) in 1270. ... The Crusader states, c. ... An Ottoman Mamluk, from 1810 A mamluk (Arabic: مملوك (singular), مماليك (plural), owned; also transliterated mameluk, mameluke, or mamluke) was a slave soldier who converted to Islam and served the Muslim caliphs and the Ottoman Empire during the Middle Ages. ... al-Malik al-Zahir Rukn al-Din Baibars al-Bunduqdari (also spelled Baybars) (Arabic: ) [1] was a Mamluk Sultan of Egypt and Syria. ... August 25 is the 237th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (238th in leap years), with 128 days remaining. ... October 30 is the 303rd day of the year (304th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 62 days remaining. ... Charles I (March 1227 (or 1226) - January 7, 1285) was the posthumous (or born ten months before fathers death: sources suggest two possible birth years) son of King Louis VIII of France by Blanche of Castile. ... A sultan (Arabic: سلطان) is an Islamic title, with several historical meanings. ... Ashkelon or Ashqelon (Hebrew אַשְׁקְלוֹן; Standard Hebrew Ašqəlon; Tiberian Hebrew ʾAšqəlôn; Arabic عسقلان (help· info); Latin Ascalon) was an ancient Philistine seaport on the east coast of the Mediterranean Sea just north of Gaza. ... The Crusader states, c. ... An Ottoman Mamluk, from 1810 A mamluk (Arabic: مملوك (singular), مماليك (plural), owned; also transliterated mameluk, mameluke, or mamluke) was a slave soldier who converted to Islam and served the Muslim caliphs and the Ottoman Empire during the Middle Ages. ... al-Malik al-Zahir Rukn al-Din Baibars al-Bunduqdari (also spelled Baybars) (Arabic: ) [1] was a Mamluk Sultan of Egypt and Syria. ... A harbor (AmE), harbour (CwE) or haven is a place where ships may shelter from the weather or are stored. ... April 8 is the 98th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (99th in leap years). ... An Ottoman Mamluk, from 1810 A mamluk (Arabic: مملوك (singular), مماليك (plural), owned; also transliterated mameluk, mameluke, or mamluke) was a slave soldier who converted to Islam and served the Muslim caliphs and the Ottoman Empire during the Middle Ages. ... al-Malik al-Zahir Rukn al-Din Baibars al-Bunduqdari (also spelled Baybars) (Arabic: ) [1] was a Mamluk Sultan of Egypt and Syria. ... Krak des Chevaliers Gothic cloister by the fortress yard Krak des Chevaliers (also Crac des Chevaliers, fortress of the knights in a mixture of Arabic and French) was the headquarters of the Knights Hospitaller in Syria during the Crusades. ... The Knights Hospitaller (also known as Knights of Rhodes, Knights of Malta, Cavaliers of Malta, and the Order of St John of Jerusalem) is a tradition which began as a Benedictine hospitaller Order founded in Jerusalem, following the First Crusade, ca. ... al-Malik al-Zahir Rukn al-Din Baibars al-Bunduqdari (also spelled Baybars) (Arabic: ) [1] was a Mamluk Sultan of Egypt and Syria. ... Tripoli Tripoli (population 1. ... Edward I (June 17, 1239–July 7, 1307), popularly known as Longshanks because of his 6 foot 2 inch (1. ... Charles I (March 1227 - January 7, 1285) was the posthumous son of King Louis VIII of France, created Count of Anjou by his elder brother King Louis IX in 1246, thus founding the second Angevin dynasty. ... The Old City of Akko in the 19th or early 20th century, looking south-west from atop the Land Wall Promenade, the open space now a parking lot. ... // Summary The Ninth Crusade which is sometimes grouped with the Eighth Crusade, is commonly considered to be the last of the medieval Crusades to defend Christianity from the Muslims in the Holy Land. ... al-Malik al-Zahir Rukn al-Din Baibars al-Bunduqdari (also spelled Baybars) (Arabic: ) [1] was a Mamluk Sultan of Egypt and Syria. ... al-Malik al-Zahir Rukn al-Din Baibars al-Bunduqdari (also spelled Baybars) (Arabic: ) [1] was a Mamluk Sultan of Egypt and Syria. ... Christian Nubia in the three states period. ... al-Malik al-Zahir Rukn al-Din Baibars al-Bunduqdari (also spelled Baybars) (Arabic: ) [1] was a Mamluk Sultan of Egypt and Syria. ... Al-Maris was an area of southern Egypt/northern Nubia from the tenth to the thirteenth century. ... Christian Nubia in the three states period. ... al-Malik al-Zahir Rukn al-Din Baibars al-Bunduqdari (also spelled Baybars) (Arabic: ) [1] was a Mamluk Sultan of Egypt and Syria. ... Asia Minor lies east of the Bosporus, between the Black Sea and the Mediterranean. ... The Sultanate of Rûm was a Seljuk sultanate in Anatolia from 1077 to 1307. ... June 1 is the 152nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (153rd in leap years), with 213 days remaining. ... al-Malik al-Zahir Rukn al-Din Baibars al-Bunduqdari (also spelled Baybars) (Arabic: ) [1] was a Mamluk Sultan of Egypt and Syria. ... An Ottoman Mamluk, from 1810 A mamluk (Arabic: مملوك (singular), مماليك (plural), owned; also transliterated mameluk, mameluke, or mamluke) was a slave soldier who converted to Islam and served the Muslim caliphs and the Ottoman Empire during the Middle Ages. ... Saif ad-Din Qalawun al-Alfi al-Mansur (also Qalaun or Kalavun) (c. ...

South Asia

Kutch (Kuchchh) District, State of Gujarat Kutch (also spelled Cutch, Kachh, Kachch and even Kachchh) is a district of Gujarat state in western India. ... The Cholas were a South Indian Tamil dynasty, antedating the early Sangam literature (c. ... The history of South India begins with the Sangam age, from 200 BC to 300 AD. It is called so after the sangam literature. ... The Hoysala Empire ruled part of southern India from 1000 to 1346. ... The Pandyan kingdom பாண்டியர் was an ancient Tamil state in South India of unknown antiquity. ...

Africa

Yekuno Amlak (throne name Tasfa Iyasus) was negus (1270 - 1285) of Ethiopia and founder of the Solomonid dynasty. ... The Zagwe Dynasty ruled Ethiopia from the end of the Kingdom of Axum to 1270, when Yekuno Amlak defeated and killed the last Zagwe king in battle. ... The Solomonid dynasty is the traditional royal house of Ethiopia, claiming descent from King Solomon and the Queen of Sheba, who is said to have given birth to the traditional first king Menelik I after her Biblically-described visit to Solomon in Jerusalem. ...

Americas

  • 1276 - A severe 23-year drought begins to affect the Grand Canyon area, eventually forcing the agriculture-dependent Anasazi culture to migrate out of the region.

A drought or an extreme dry periodic climate is an extended period where water availability falls below the statistical requirements for a region. ... The known history of the Grand Canyon area stretches back 10,500 years when the first evidence for human presence in the area started. ... Ancient Pueblo People, or Ancestral Puebloans is the preferred term for the group of peoples often known as Anasazi who are the ancestors of the modern Pueblo peoples. ...

Culture

Science, literature, and industry

Witelo - also known as Erazmus Ciolek Witelo, Witelon, Vitellio, Vitello, Vitello Thuringopolonis, Erazm CioÅ‚ek, (born ca. ... Alhazen Abu Ali al-Hasan Ibn Al-Haitham (also: Ibn al Haitham) (965-1040) (Arabic: أبو علي الحسن بن الهيثم) was an Arab Muslim mathematician; he is sometimes called al-Basri (Arabic: البصري), after his birthplace Basra, Arab Islamic Caliphate (now Iraq). ... The Arabic language (Arabic: ‎ translit: ), or simply Arabic (Arabic: ‎ translit: ), is the largest member of the Semitic branch of the Afro-Asiatic language family (classification: South Central Semitic) and is closely related to Hebrew and Aramaic. ... Latin is an ancient Indo-European language originally spoken in the region around Rome called Latium. ... World map showing Europe Europe is one of the seven continents of Earth which, in this case, is more a cultural and political distinction than a physiographic one, leading to various perspectives about Europes borders. ... Sanskrit ( संस्कृतम् ; pronunciation: ) is an Indo-European classical language of India and a liturgical language of Hinduism, Buddhism, and Jainism. ... The Panchatantra (also spelled Pañcatantra, Sanskrit पञ्चतन्त्र Five Chapters , Kelileh va Demneh or Kalilag and Damnag in Persian) is a collection of Sanskrit fables in prose and verse. ... The Common Era (CE), sometimes known as the Christian Era or Current Era, is the period of measured time beginning with the year 1 (the traditional birthdate of Jesus) to the present. ... Latin is an ancient Indo-European language originally spoken in the region around Rome called Latium. ... Hebrew (עִבְרִית ‘Ivrit) is a Semitic language of the Afro-Asiatic language family spoken by more than seven million people in Israel and Jewish communities around the world. ... Marco Polo (September 15, 1254, Curzola, Dalmatia — January 8, 1324, Venice, Italy) was a Venetian trader and explorer who, together with his father Niccolò and his uncle Maffeo, was one of the first Westerners to travel the Silk Road to China (which he called Cathay) and visited the Great Khan... View of Venice to San Giorgio Maggiore island from St Marks Campanile. ... Kublai Khan, Khubilai Khan or the last of the Great Khans (September 23, [[1215] - February 18, 1294) (Mongolian: Хубилай хаан, Chinese: 忽必烈, also spelled as Kubilay Han in Turkic), was a Mongol military leader. ... The Worshipful Company of Cordwainers is one of the Livery Companies of the City of London. ... Modern leather-working tools Leather is a material created through the tanning of hides, pelts and skins of animals, primarily cows. ... London is the capital city of the United Kingdom and of England and is the most populous city in the European Union. ... Royal motto (French): Dieu et mon droit (Translated: God and my right) Englands location (dark green) within the United Kingdom (light green), with the Republic of Ireland (blue) to its west Languages English Capital London Largest city London Area – Total Ranked 1st UK 130,395 km² Population – Total (mid... Radio telescopes are among many different tools used by astronomers Astronomy (Greek: αστρονομία = άστρον + νόμος, astronomia = astron + nomos, literally, law of the stars) is the science of celestial objects and phenomena that originate outside the Earths atmosphere, such as stars, planets, comets, auroras, galaxies, and the cosmic background radiation. ... The Alfonsine tables were astronomical tables drawn up at Toledo by order of Alfonso X in 1252 to correct the anomalies in the Ptolemaic tables; they divided the year into 365 days, 5 hours, 49 minutes, 16 seconds. ... The Hundred Rolls are a census of England and parts of what is now Wales taken in the late thirteenth century. ... Royal motto (French): Dieu et mon droit (Translated: God and my right) Englands location (dark green) within the United Kingdom (light green), with the Republic of Ireland (blue) to its west Languages English Capital London Largest city London Area – Total Ranked 1st UK 130,395 km² Population – Total (mid... 1870 US Census for New York City A census is the process of obtaining information about every member of a population (not necessarily a human population). ... Doomesday Book (also known as Domesday, or Book of Winchester), was the record of the great survey of England completed in 1086, executed for William the Conqueror, that was similar to a census by a government of today. ... Events Domesday Book is completed in England Emperor Shirakawa of Japan starts his cloistered rule Imam Ali Mosque is rebuilt by the Seljuk Malik Shah I after being destroyed by fire. ... Events Eleanor de Montfort is captured by pirates in the employ of Edward I of England to prevent her marriage to Llywelyn the Last, prince of Jews over the age of 7 to wear the yellow badge and makes usury illegal Jean de Meun writes the second portion of the... Jean de Meun or Jean de Meung (c. ... An allegory (from Greek αλλος, allos, other, and αγορευειν, agoreuein, to speak in public) is a figurative mode of representation conveying a meaning other than and in addition to the literal. ... Mirth and Gladness lead a Dance in this miniature from a manuscript of the Roman de la Rose in the Bodleian Library (MS Douce 364, folio 8r). ... Guillaume de Lorris (born 12XX) was a French epic poet, and was the author of the first section of the Romance of the Rose. ... Events Kingdom of Leon unites with the Kingdom of Castile. ... Ramon Llull. ... Diethyl ether, also known as ether and ethoxyethane, is a clear, colorless, and highly flammable liquid with a low boiling point and a characteristic smell. ... The verge escapement is the earliest known type of escapement, the mechanism in a clock that maintains the swinging of a pendulum. ... A simple escapement. ... A wall clock A clock (from the Latin cloca, bell) is an instrument for measuring time, usually for measuring time of intervals less than a day--as opposed to a calendar. ... The Hundred Rolls are a census of England and parts of what is now Wales taken in the late thirteenth century. ... Royal motto (French): Dieu et mon droit (Translated: God and my right) Englands location (dark green) within the United Kingdom (light green), with the Republic of Ireland (blue) to its west Languages English Capital London Largest city London Area – Total Ranked 1st UK 130,395 km² Population – Total (mid... 1870 US Census for New York City A census is the process of obtaining information about every member of a population (not necessarily a human population). ... Doomesday Book (also known as Domesday, or Book of Winchester), was the record of the great survey of England completed in 1086, executed for William the Conqueror, that was similar to a census by a government of today. ... Events Domesday Book is completed in England Emperor Shirakawa of Japan starts his cloistered rule Imam Ali Mosque is rebuilt by the Seljuk Malik Shah I after being destroyed by fire. ... For broader historical context, see 1280s and 13th century. ... Colophon of al-Razis Book of Medicine Al-Razi, (full name AbÅ« Bakr Muhammad Ibn ZakarÄ«ya al-Rāzi, in Persian زكريای رازی Zakaria ye Razi, in Arabic ابو بکر محمد بن زكريا الرازی), and also Zakaria al-Razi in Arabic; or in Latin as Rhazes and Rasis. ... Latin was the language originally spoken in the region around Rome called Latium. ... This article needs to be wikified. ... The Royal Mint is the body permitted to manufacture, or mint, coins in the United Kingdom. ... Royal motto (French): Dieu et mon droit (Translated: God and my right) Englands location (dark green) within the United Kingdom (light green), with the Republic of Ireland (blue) to its west Languages English Capital London Largest city London Area – Total Ranked 1st UK 130,395 km² Population – Total (mid... For the film with this title, see Tower of London (1939 film). ...

Art, architecture, and music

A cathedral is a Christian church building, specifically of a denomination with an episcopal hierarchy, such as the Anglican, Catholic and some Lutheran churches, which serves as the central church of a diocese, and thus as a bishops seat. ... An old view of the Rock of Cashel from the town. ... for a more detailed article on Caerphilly Castle see Caerphilly Caerphilly Castle is a Norman castle that dominates the centre of the town of Caerphilly in south Wales. ... For an explanation of often confusing terms such as Great Britain, Britain, United Kingdom, England and Wales and England, see British Isles (terminology). ... External links Photos on Radzima. ... A khachkar in Echmiadzin Khachkar (Խաչքար in Armenian, meaning cross-stone) is a carved memorial stone, typically found in Armenia. ... Sourb Nshan (Holy Sign of the Cross) church Haghpat (Հաղպատ in Armenian) is a village in the Northern Lorri province of Armenia, close to the city of Alaverdi and the state border with Georgia. ... Minoritenkirche in winter The Minoritenkirche, formal name: Italienische Nationalkirche Maria Schnee (English: Greyfriars Church or Minorite Church, formal Italian National Church of Mary of the Snows) is a church built in French cathedral Gothic style in the First District of Vienna. ... Vienna (German: Wien ; Bosnian, Croatian, and Serbian: Beč, Czech: Vídeň, Hungarian: Bécs, Romanian: Viena, Romani: Bech or Vidnya, Russian: Вена, Slovak: Viedeň, Slovenian: Dunaj) is the capital of Austria, and also one of the nine States of Austria. ... Otakar II (also spelled Ottokar or Přemysl Otakar/Ottokar) (c. ...

Religion

Christianity

Averroism was a philosophical trend among scholastics in the late 1200s based on Averroës interpretations of Aristotle. ... Aristotle, marble copy of bronze by Lysippos, Louvre, Paris Aristotle (Ancient Greek: Aristotélēs 384 – March 7, 322 BC) was an ancient Greek philosopher, a student of Plato and teacher of Alexander the Great. ... The name Catholic Church can mean a visible organization that refers to itself as Catholic, or the invisible Christian Church, viz. ... The Condemnations at the medieval University of Paris were enacted with papal authority to restrict certain teachings as being heretical. ... The Pope (from Greek: pappas, father; from Latin: papa, Papa, father) is the head of the Roman Catholic Church. ... The Sorbonne, Paris, in a 17th century engraving The historic University of Paris (French: Université de Paris) first appeared in the second half of the 12th century, but was in 1970 reorganized as 13 autonomous universities (University of Paris I–XIII). ... December 6 is the 340th day (341st on leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Saint Thomas Aquinas [Thomas of Aquin, or Aquino] (c. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Catholicism. ... Theology is reasoned discourse concerning God (Greek θεος, theos, God, + λογος, logos, word or reason). It can also refer to the study of other religious topics. ... Mass is the term used to describe celebration of the Eucharist in the Western liturgical rites of the Roman Catholic Church, in the Anglo-Catholic tradition of Anglicanism, and in some largely High Church Lutheran regions: in Scandinavian countries the main non-Eucharistic Lutheran service is also known as the... May 7 is the 127th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (128th in leap years). ... The Second Council of Lyon was a Roman Catholic council convened in Lyon in 1274. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Catholicism. ... The phrase The Holy Land (Arabic الأرض المقدسة, al-Arḍ ul-Muqaddasah; Hebrew ארץ הקודש: Standard Hebrew Éreẓ haQodeš, Tiberian Hebrew ʾÉreṣ haqQāḏēš; Latin Terra Sancta) generally refers to Israel, otherwise known as Palestine (sometimes including Jordan, Syria and parts of Egypt). ... This article is about the medieval crusades. ... Great Schism redirects here. ... ... A tithe (from Old English teogotha tenth) is a one-tenth part of something, paid as a voluntary contribution or as a tax or levy, usually to support a Jewish or Christian religious organization. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... This article is part of the Witchcraft series. ... Representation of an Auto de fe, (1475). ... The Capitole, the 18th century city hall of Toulouse and best known landmark in the city; in the foreground is the Place du Capitole, a hub of urban life at the very center of the city Toulouse (pronounced in standard French, and in local Toulouse accent) (Occitan: Tolosa, pronounced ) is...

Judaism

The Alt-neu Schul The Old New Synagogue in Josefov, Prague, (the Alt-neu Schul) is Europes oldest active synagogue. ... Prague (Czech: Praha (IPA: ), see also other names) is the capital and largest city of the Czech Republic. ... Edward I (June 17, 1239–July 7, 1307), popularly known as Longshanks because of his 6 foot 2 inch (1. ... Royal motto (French): Dieu et mon droit (Translated: God and my right) Englands location (dark green) within the United Kingdom (light green), with the Republic of Ireland (blue) to its west Languages English Capital London Largest city London Area – Total Ranked 1st UK 130,395 km² Population – Total (mid... The yellow badge which Jews were forced to wear during the Nazi occupation of Europe: a black Star of David on a yellow field, with the word Jew written inside. ... . Nicholas III, né Giovanni Gaetano Orsini (Rome, ca. ...

Buddhism

September 12 is the 255th day of the year (256th in leap years). ... Nichiren Buddhism (日蓮系諸宗派: Nichiren-kei sho shÅ«ha) is a branch of Buddhism based on the teachings of the 13th century Japanese monk Nichiren (1222–1282). ... Nichiren (日蓮) (February 16, 1222 – October 13, 1282), born Zennichimaro (善日麿), later Zeshō-bō Renchō (是生房蓮長), and finally Nichiren (日蓮), was a Buddhist monk of 13th century Japan. ... A stone image of the Buddha. ... Nichiren (日蓮) (February 16, 1222 – October 13, 1282), born Zennichimaro (善日麿), later Zeshō-bō Renchō (是生房蓮長), and finally Nichiren (日蓮), was a Buddhist monk of 13th century Japan. ... Minobu (身延町; -chou) is a town located in Minamikoma District, Yamanashi, Japan. ... October 12 is the 285th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (286th in leap years). ... Nichiren ShōshÅ« (日蓮正宗) is a branch of Nichiren Buddhism based on the teachings of the 13th century Japanese monk Nichiren (1222–1282). ... Nichiren ShōshÅ« (日蓮正宗) is a branch of Nichiren Buddhism based on the teachings of the 13th century Japanese monk Nichiren (1222–1282). ... Buddhism is a religion and philosophy focusing on the teachings of the Buddha Śākyamuni (Siddhārtha Gautama), who probably lived in the 5th century BCE. Buddhism spread throughout the ancient Indian sub-continent in the five centuries following the Buddhas death, and propagated into Central, Southeast, and East Asia... Nichiren (日蓮) (February 16, 1222 – October 13, 1282), born Zennichimaro (善日麿), later Zeshō-bō Renchō (是生房蓮長), and finally Nichiren (日蓮), was a Buddhist monk of 13th century Japan. ...

Islam

Mawlana Rumi Mawlānā Jalāl ad-DÄ«n Muhammad RÅ«mÄ«[1] (Arabic:مولانا جلال الدين محمد رومي) ‎ (1207 – 1273 CE), also known as Muhammad BalkhÄ« (Persian: محمد بلخى) or Celâladin Mehmet Rumi (Turkish), was a Persian poet, jurist, theologian and teacher of Sufism. ... Sufism (Arabic تصوف taṣawwuf) is a system of esoteric philosophy commonly associated with Islam. ... The Mevlevi Order or the Mevleviye are a Sufi order founded by the followers of the Persian Jalal al-Din Muhammad Rumi in 1273 in Konya present day Turkey; also known as The Whirling Dervishes due to their famous practice of whirling as a form of dhikr (remeberence of Allah... Tomb of Mevlana Rumi is a popular attraction of Konya. ... Ramon Llull. ... Majorca (Mallorca in Catalan and Spanish, sometimes also encountered in English),: from Latin insula maior, later Maiorica, (major island) is one of the Balearic Islands (Catalan: Illes Balears, Spanish: Islas Baleares), which are located in the Mediterranean Sea and are a part of Spain. ... The Arabic language (Arabic: ‎ translit: ), or simply Arabic (Arabic: ‎ translit: ), is the largest member of the Semitic branch of the Afro-Asiatic language family (classification: South Central Semitic) and is closely related to Hebrew and Aramaic. ... The English language word proselytism is derived ultimately from the Greek language prefix pros (towards) and the verb erchomai (to come). ... Copyrighted Image Photo courtesy of Wayne B. Chandler Moorish Ambassador to Queen Elizabeth I The Moors were the medieval Muslim inhabitants of al-Andalus (the Iberian Peninsula including the present day Spain and Portugal) and the Maghreb and western Africa, whose culture is often called Moorish. ...

Zoroastrianism

  • 1278 - The earliest known written copy of the Avesta, a collection of ancient sacred Persian Zoroastrian texts previously passed down orally, is produced.

See Avesta Municipality for the Swedish town Yasna 28. ... Motto: Persian: Esteqlāl, āzādÄ«, jomhÅ«rÄ«-ye eslāmÄ« (English: Independence, freedom, (the) Islamic Republic) Anthem: SorÅ«d-e MellÄ«-e Īrān Capital Tehran Largest city Tehran Official language(s) Persian Government Islamic republic Supreme Leader President Ali Khamenei Mahmoud Ahmadinejad Revolution Declared Overthrew Mohammad Reza Pahlavi... Zoroastrianism was adapted from an earlier, polytheistic faith by Zarathushtra (Zoroaster) in Persia very roughly around 1000 BC (although, in the absence of written records, some scholars estimates are as late as 600 BC). ...

Births

Jacob ben Asher, in Hebrew Yaakov ben Asher, (1270-ca 1340) was an influential Medieval rabbinic authority. ... Rabbi (Classical Hebrew רִבִּי ribbī;; modern Ashkenazi and Israeli רַבִּי rabbī) in Judaism, means teacher, or more literally great one. The word Rabbi is derived from the Hebrew root-word RaV, which in biblical Hebrew means great or distinguished, (in knowledge). In the ancient Judean schools (and among Sefaradim today) the sages... Zhu Shijie (朱世杰 mid-1270s?-1330?) also known as Chu Shih-Chieh was one of the greatest Chinese mathematicians. ... Leonhard Euler is considered by many people to be one of the greatest mathematicians of all time A mathematician is a person whose primary area of study and research is mathematics. ... Ghazan Khan was ruler of the Ilkhanate from 1295 to 1305. ... Honorary guard of Mongolia. ... Khanates of Mongolian Empire: Il-Khanate, Chagatai Khanate, Empire of the Great Khan (Yuan Dynasty), Golden Horde The Ilkhanate (also spelled Il-khanate or Il Khanate) was one of the four divisions within the Mongol Empire. ... Abulfeda (or Abud-Fida IsmaIl ibnAh,Imad-ud-Dni) (November 1273 - October 26, 1331) was an Arab historian and geographer. ... The Arabs (Arabic: عرب ) are a large and heterogeneous ethnic group found throughout the Middle East and North Africa. ... Events September 8 - Stefan Dusan declares himself king of Serbia Start of the reign of Emperor Kogon of Japan, first of the Northern Ashikaga Pretenders Births Coluccio Salutati, Florentine political leader (died 1406) Deaths January 14 - Odoric, Italian explorer October 27 - Abulfeda, Arab historian and geographer (born 1273) Categories: 1331... July 11 is the 192nd day (193rd in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 173 days remaining. ... Robert I, (Roibert a Briuis in medieval Gaelic, Raibeart Bruis in modern Scottish Gaelic and Robert de Brus in Norman French), usually known in modern English today as Robert the Bruce (11 July 1274 – 7 June 1329), was King of Scotland (1306 – 1329). ... Motto: Nemo me impune lacessit (English: No one provokes me with impunity) Scotlands location within Europe Scotlands location within the United Kingdom Languages English, Gaelic, Scots Capital Edinburgh Largest city Glasgow First Minister Jack McConnell Area - Total - % water Ranked 2nd UK 78,782 km² 1. ... Events Antipope Nicholas V is excommunicated by Pope John XXII. Aimone of Savoy becomes Count of Savoy. ... William Wallace Monument For other people named William Wallace, see William Wallace (disambiguation). ... Motto: Nemo me impune lacessit (English: No one provokes me with impunity) Scotlands location within Europe Scotlands location within the United Kingdom Languages English, Gaelic, Scots Capital Edinburgh Largest city Glasgow First Minister Jack McConnell Area - Total - % water Ranked 2nd UK 78,782 km² 1. ... Events August 5 - English troops capture William Wallace Wenceslas III becomes king of Bohemia Archbishop of Bordeaux, Bertrand de Got, was elected as Pope Clement V. Philip IV of France accused the Knights Templar of heresy. ... Yesün Temür Khan (Classical Mongolian: Yesün temür qaɤan; Khalkha Mongolian: Есѳнтѳмѳр хаан Yösöntömör haan) was the tenth grand-khan of the Mongol Empire (Dai-ön Ulus/Yuan Dynasty) who reigned from 1323 to 1328. ... Khan (sometimes spelled as Xan, Han) is a title with many meanings, originally commander, leader or ruler, in Mongolian and Turkish. ... Mongol Empires largest extent coloured in blue. ... Events Augustiner brew Munich May 1 - Treaty of Edinburgh-Northampton - England recognises Scotland as an independent nation after the Wars of Scottish Independence May 12 - Nicholas V is consecrated at St Peters Basilica in Rome by the bishop of Venice. ... Nicola Pisano (c. ... // The world in 1220 Middle Ages in Europe Fifth Crusade (1217-1221) Events Mongols first invade Abbasid caliphate - Bukhara and Samarkand taken End of the Kara-Khitan Khanate, destroyed by Genghis Khans Mongolian cavalry Dominican Order approved by Pope Honorius III Frederick II crowned Holy Roman Emperor by Pope...

Deaths


  Results from FactBites:
 
1270s (851 words)
1270s is one of the topics in focus at Global Oneness.
September 29 - Rudolph I of Germany is elected King of Germany over rival candidate King Otakar II of Bohemia, ending the Interregnum; Otakar refuses to acknowledge Rudolph as the new king, leading to the outbreak of war in 1276.
December - Crucial aspects of the philosophy of Averroism (itself based on Aristotle's works) are banned by the Catholic church in a condemnation enacted by papal authority at the University of Paris.
1270s - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2783 words)
1230s 1240s 1250s - 1260s - 1270s 1280s 1290s
The 1270s is the decade starting January 1, 1270, and ending December 31, 1279.
In Europe, power struggles within the Holy Roman Empire escalated into civil war as the 23-year interregnum without an emperor came to an end.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m