FACTOID # 4: Just 1% of the houses in Nevada were built before 1939.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
RELATED ARTICLES
People who viewed "1260s" also viewed:
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > 1260s
Millennia: 2nd millennium
Centuries: 12th century - 13th century - 14th century
Decades: 1230s 1240s 1250s - 1260s - 1270s 1280s 1290s
Years: 1260 1261 1262 1263 1264
1265 1266 1267 1268 1269
Categories: Births - Deaths - Architecture
Establishments - Disestablishments

The 1260s is the decade starting January 1, 1260 and ending December 31, 1269. These pages contain the trends of millennia and centuries. ... On the Gregorian calendar, the 2nd millennium commenced on 1 January 1001, and ended at the end of 31 December 2000. ... These pages contain the trends of millennia and centuries. ... (11th century - 12th century - 13th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 12th century was that century which lasted from 1101 to 1200. ... (12th century - 13th century - 14th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 13th century was that century which lasted from 1201 to 1300. ... This 14th-century statue from south India depicts the gods Shiva (on the left) and Uma (on the right). ... This is a list of decades which have articles with more information about them. ... Centuries: 12th century - 13th century - 14th century Decades: 1180s 1190s 1200s 1210s 1220s - 1230s - 1240s 1250s 1260s 1270s 1280s Years: 1230 1231 1232 1233 1234 1235 1236 1237 1238 1239 Events and Trends Categories: 1230s ... Centuries: 12th century - 13th century - 14th century Decades: 1190s 1200s 1210s 1220s 1230s - 1240s - 1250s 1260s 1270s 1280s 1290s Years: 1240 1241 1242 1243 1244 1245 1246 1247 1248 1249 Events and Trends Hungary was partially demolished with a great loss of life in 1241–1242 by Mongol armies of... The 1250s is the decade starting January 1, 1250 and ending December 31, 1259. ... The 1270s is the decade starting January 1, 1270, and ending December 31, 1279. ... The 1280s is the decade starting January 1, 1280 and ending December 31, 1289. ... Centuries: 12th century - 13th century - 14th century Decades: 1240s 1250s 1260s 1270s 1280s - 1290s - 1300s 1310s 1320s 1330s 1340s Years: 1290 1291 1292 1293 1294 1295 1296 1297 1298 1299 Events and Trends Categories: 1290s ... The magnificent Cathedral of Chartres was dedicated in 1260. ... Events July 25 - Constantinople re-captured by Nicaean forces under the command of Michael VIII Palaeologus, Byzantine Empire re-formed August 29 - Urban IV becomes Pope, the last man to do so without being a Cardinal first Bela IV of Hungary repels Tatar invasion Charles of Anjou given rule of... Events Strasbourg becomes a Free City of the Holy Roman Empire First Visconti become the lord of Iceland swear fealty to the king of Norway, bringing an end to the Icelandic Commonwealth Births Ladislaus IV of Hungary Deaths Monarchs/Presidents Aragon - James I King of Aragon and count of Barcelona... Events Detmold, Germany was founded. ... A contemporary monument to the Battle of Lewes, a crucial 1264 battle in the Second Barons War in England. ... For broader historical context, see 1260s and 13th century. ... For broader historical context, see 1260s and 13th century. ... For broader historical context, see 1260s and 13th century. ... Conradin (right) is executed by Charles I of Sicily, thus extinguishing the Hohenstaufen dynasty, in 1268. ... Events Births Deaths Monarchs/Presidents Aragon - James I King of Aragon and count of Barcelona (reigned from 1213 to 1276) Categories: 1269 ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The magnificent Cathedral of Chartres was dedicated in 1260. ... is the 365th day of the year (366th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events Births Deaths Monarchs/Presidents Aragon - James I King of Aragon and count of Barcelona (reigned from 1213 to 1276) Categories: 1269 ...


In the Mongol Empire, Kublai Khan became the supreme leader and moved his capital to Beijing; while he fought the southern Chinese Song Dynasty, the empire saw its first significant military defeats — first in Palestine at the hands of the Mamluks of Egypt, and later in the Caucasus. The Mamluks, led by their new sultan Baibars, quickly became a regional power in the Middle East by capturing a number of crusader states and repulsing Mongol attacks. The Empire of Nicaea succeeded in capturing Constantinople and the rest of the Latin Empire, thus re-establishing the Byzantine Empire. Expansion of the Mongol Empire Historical map of the Mongol Empire (1300~1405), the gray area is Timurid dynasty. ... For other uses, see Kublai Khan (disambiguation). ... Peking redirects here. ... Northern Song in 1111 AD Capital Bianjing (汴京) (960–1127) Linan (臨安) (1127–1276) Language(s) Chinese Religion Buddhism, Taoism, Confucianism Government Monarchy Emperor  - 960–976 Emperor Taizu  - 1126–1127 Emperor Qinzong  - 1127–1162 Emperor Gaozong  - 1278–1279 Emperor Bing History  - Zhao Kuangyin taking over the throne of the Later Zhou... A 2003 satellite image of the region. ... An Ottoman Mamluk, from 1810 Mamluks (or Mameluks) (the Arabic word usually translates as owned, singular: مملوك plural: مماليك) comprised slave soldiers used by the Muslim Caliphs and the Ottoman Empire, and who on more than one occasion seized power for themselves. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Caucasus Mountains. ... al-Malik al-Zahir Rukn al-Din Baibars al-Bunduqdari (also spelled Baybars) (Arabic: ) was a Mamluk Sultan of Egypt and Syria. ... A map showing countries commonly considered to be part of the Middle East The Middle East is a region comprising the lands around the southern and eastern parts of the Mediterranean Sea, a territory that extends from the eastern Mediterranean Sea to the Persian Gulf. ... The Near East in 1135, with the Crusader states in green hues. ... The Empire of Nicaea was the largest of the states founded by refugees from the Byzantine Empire after Constantinople was conquered during the Fourth Crusade. ... This article is about the city before the Fall of Constantinople (1453). ... Arms of the Latin Empire of Constantinople The Latin Empire with its vassals and the Greek successor states after the partition of the Byzantine Empire, c. ... Byzantine redirects here. ...


In Europe, political strife and territorial disputes led to widespread warfare around the continent. England witnessed the Second Barons' War, a civil war fought over the aristocracy's disillusionment with King Henry III's attempts to maintain an absolute monarchy. The pope of the Catholic Church, aligned against the Hohenstaufen dynasty of the Holy Roman Emperor, succeeded in eliminating the line when the last male heir, Conradin, was killed by papal ally Charles I of Sicily, a Frenchman. Meanwhile, King Otakar II of Bohemia became the most powerful prince in Europe, expanding his territories through both warfare and inheritance. In other developments, both Iceland and Greenland accepted the overlordship of Norway, but Scotland was able to repulse a Norse invasion and broker a favorable peace settlement. In Spain, the Reconquista continued as several important cities were recaptured from the Moors. Political reforms were instituted in the election procedures of the pope and the doges of Venice, and the parliaments of Ireland and England met for the first time. For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... The Second Barons War (1264–1267) was a civil war in England between the forces of a number of rebellious barons lead by Simon de Montfort, against the Royalist forces led by Prince Edward (later Edward I of England). ... This article is about the definition of the specific type of war. ... Henry III (1 October 1207 – 16 November 1272) was the son and successor of John Lackland as King of England, reigning for fifty-six years from 1216 to his death. ... Forms of government Part of the Politics series Politics Portal This box:      Absolute monarchy is a monarchical form of government where the monarch has the power to rule his or her land or country and its citizens freely, with no laws or legally-organized direct opposition in force. ... For other uses, see Pope (disambiguation). ... Catholic Church redirects here. ... Arms of the Hohenstaufen Dynasty The Hohenstaufen (or the Staufer(s)) were a dynasty of Kings of Germany, many of whom were also crowned Holy Roman Emperor and Dukes of Swabia. ... The Holy Roman Emperor was, with some variation, the ruler of the Holy Roman Empire, the predecessor of modern Germany, during its existence from the 10th century until its collapse in 1806. ... Portrait of Conradin from the Codex Manesse (Folio 7r). ... Statue of Charles I of Anjou by Arnolfo di Cambio, Rome, Palazzo dei Conservatori. ... Motto: Liberté, Égalité, Fraternité Liberty, Equality, Fraternity Anthem: La Marseillaise France() – on the European continent() – in the European Union() Capital (and largest city) Paris Official languages French Demonym French Government Unitary semi-presidential republic  -  President Nicolas Sarkozy  -  Prime Minister François Fillon Formation  -  French State 843 French State Formed   -  Current... Otakar II (also spelled Ottokar or PÅ™emysl Otakar/Ottokar) (c. ... This article is about the country. ... For other uses, see Reconquista (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see moor. ... For other uses, see Pope (disambiguation). ... Grand Procession of the Doge, 16th century Doges Palace Complex For some thousand years, the chief magistrate and leader of the Republic of Venice was the Doge (Duke). ...


Several important cultural achievements were made in the decade, including publication of Roger Bacon's important scientific work Opus Majus and Thomas Aquinas' Summa contra Gentiles. Masterpieces of architecture and sculpture were completed at cathedrals around Europe, including the Cathedral of Chartres and Nicola Pisano's pulpits for the Duomo di Siena and Pisa's Baptistery. In religion, the Sukhothai kingdom in Thailand adopted Buddhism as its official religion. In Europe anti-Semitism intensified, as several authorities promulgated laws requiring Jews to wear identifying yellow badges, Jews were massacred in England, and the Talmud was attacked and censored by the Catholic Church. For the Nova Scotia premier see Roger Bacon (politician). ... Aquinas redirects here. ... The Summa contra Gentiles (hereafter referred to as SCG) was written by St. ... For other uses, see Cathedral (disambiguation). ... The Cathedral of Chartres (Cathedral of Our Lady of Chartres, French: Cathédrale Notre-Dame de Chartres), located in Chartres, about 50 miles (80 km) from Paris, is considered one of the finest examples in all France of the Gothic style of architecture. ... Nicola Pisano (c. ... For other uses of Ambo, see Ambo, Ethiopia, Kom Ombo, ambulance Ambo (band). ... Duomo di Siena is the medieval cathedral of Siena, Italy. ... For other uses, see Pisa (disambiguation). ... The Campo dei Miracoli (Field of Miracles) is a wide, walled area at the heart of the city of Pisa, Tuscany, Italy, recognized as one of the main centers for medieval art in the world. ... The Sukhothai kingdom was a kingdom in the north of Thailand around the city Sukhothai. ... Buddhism is a variety of teachings described as a religion[1] or way of life. ... The Eternal Jew: 1937 German poster. ... Compulsory Jewish badge under the Nazi occupation of Europe: the Star of David with the word Jew inside (this one in German) A yellow badge, also referred to as a Jewish badge, was a mandatory mark or a piece of cloth of specific geometric shape, worn on the outer garment... The Talmud (Hebrew: ) is a record of rabbinic discussions pertaining to Jewish law, ethics, customs, and history. ...

Contents

War and politics

Europe

War and peace

North and West Europe

http://www. ... Žemaičiai (Samogitians) is an ethnic group inhabiting a part of Lithuania called Žemaitija (Samogitia or Lower Lands). ... The Curonians (also called Kursi, Latvian KurÅ¡i) are one of the extinct Baltic tribes that later formed the Latvian nation. ... For the state, see Monastic state of the Teutonic Knights. ... Livonian Confederation in 1260, showing the location of the Battle of Durbe Baltic tribes at the beginning of the 13th century before the orders started their crusade The Battle of Durbe (Lithuanian: ) was a medieval battle fought near Durbe, 23 km east of Liepaja, in present-day Latvia during the... Coronation of King Alexander on Moot Hill, Scone. ... Haakon Haakonsson (1204 – December 15, 1263) (Norwegian HÃ¥kon HÃ¥konsson, Old Norse Hákon Hákonarson), also called Haakon the Old, was king of Norway from 1217 to 1263. ... The Battle of Largs took place in Largs, North Ayrshire in 1263 between Scotland and the forces of King Magnus III of Man and the Isles as well as the manxmens ally, King Haakon IV of Norway. ... The Icelandic Commonwealth or the Icelandic Free State (Icelandic: Þjóðveldisöld) was the state existing in Iceland between the establishment of the Althing in 930 and the pledge of fealty to the Norwegian king in 1262. ... This article is about the country. ... Coronation of King Alexander on Moot Hill, Scone. ... Magnus Lagabøte (lit. ... The Treaty of Perth ended military conflict between Norway under Magnus the Law-mender and Scotland under Alexander III over the sovereignty of the Western Isles, the Isle of Mann and Caithness. ... The Western Isles are an archipelago in Scotland. ...

Central and South Europe

Sion|Bishopry of Sion]] defends against an invasion by the County of Savoy. is the 247th day of the year (248th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Manfred (c. ... The Guelphs and Ghibellines were factions supporting, respectively, the Papacy and the Holy Roman Empire in Italy during the 12th century and 13th century. ... The Guelphs and Ghibellines were factions supporting, respectively, the Papacy and the Holy Roman Empire in Italy during the 12th century and 13th century. ... Capital Sion Population (2003) 278,200 (Ranked 9th)   - Density 53 /km² Area 5224 km² (Ranked 3rd) Highest point Dufourspitze 4634 m Joined 1815 Abbreviation VS Languages French, German Executive Conseil dEtat, Staatsrat (5) Legislative Grand Conseil, Grosser Rat (130) Municipalities 160 municipalities Districts 13 districts, Bezirke Website www. ... The Counts of Savoy (Italian Savoia, French Savoie) emerged, along with the free communes of Switzerland, from the collapse of the Frankish Kingdom of Burgundy. ...

For other uses, see Genoa (disambiguation). ... Chania (Greek Χανιά pronounced , also transliterated Hania, older form Chanea and Venetian: Canea, Ottoman Turkish: خانيه Hanya) is the second largest city of Crete and the capital of the Chania Prefecture. ... For other uses, see Crete (disambiguation). ... Borders of the Republic of Venice in 1796 Capital Venice Language(s) Venetian, Latin, Italian Religion Roman Catholic Government Republic Doge  - 1789–97 Ludovico Manin History  - Established 697  - Treaty of Zara June 27, 1358  - Treaty of Leoben April 17, 1797 * Traditionally, the establishment of the Republic is dated to 697. ... is the 57th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Battle of Benevento was fought in Southern Italy on February 26, 1266, where the invading Angevin forces led by Charles, the Count of Anjou, overcame a combined German-Sicilian force led by Manfred of Sicily. ... Statue of Charles I of Anjou by Arnolfo di Cambio, Rome, Palazzo dei Conservatori. ... Modern département of Maine-et-Loire, which largely corresponds to Anjou Anjou is a former county (c. ... Sicily ( in Italian and Sicilian) is an autonomous region of Italy and the largest island in the Mediterranean Sea, with an area of 25,708 km² (9,926 sq. ... Manfred (c. ... Pope Clement IV (Saint-Gilles-du-Gard, November 23, year uncertain – November 29, 1268 in Viterbo), born Gui Faucoi le Gros (English: Guy Foulques the Fat; Italian: Guido il Grosso), was elected Pope February 15, 1265, in a conclave held at Perugia that took four months, while cardinals argued over... Sicily ( in Italian and Sicilian) is an autonomous region of Italy and the largest island in the Mediterranean Sea, with an area of 25,708 km² (9,926 sq. ... Location of the city of Naples (red dot) within Italy. ...

Iberian Peninsula

James I of Aragon. ... Categories: Spain geography stubs | Cities in Spain ... For other uses, see moor. ... For other uses, see Reconquista (disambiguation). ... James I of Aragon. ... For other uses, see Reconquista (disambiguation). ... Orihuela is a city and municipality located in the province of Alicante, Spain. ... Location of Alicante province in Spain, in a deeper red shade within the Valencian Community. ... Flag of Elx. ... Capital Valencia Official languages Valencian (Catalan) and Castilian (Spanish) Area  â€“ total  â€“ % of Spain Ranked 8th  23,255 km²  4. ... For other uses, see moor. ... For people named Islam, see Islam (name). ... Alfonso X and his court. ... Location Coordinates : Time zone : CET (GMT +1) - summer : CEST (GMT +2) General information Native name Alacant (Catalan) Spanish name Alicante Postal code 03000 - 03016 Website www. ... For other uses, see moor. ... For other uses, see Reconquista (disambiguation). ... Afonso III of Portugal (Portuguese pron. ... Alfonso X and his court. ... Guadiana (Latin Anas, Spanish Guadiana, Portuguese Guadiana) - one of the major rivers of Spain, part of it is the border with Portugal, ends in the Atlantic Ocean. ...

Southeast Europe

Otakar II (also spelled Ottokar or Přemysl Otakar/Ottokar) (c. ... Coat of arms of the Dukes of Styria, crowned with the ducal hat, today state coat The Duchy of Styria (German: Herzogtum Steiermark, Slovenian Štajerska) was a duchy of the Holy Roman Empire until its dissolution in 1806, and a crownland of Austria-Hungary until its dissolution in 1918. ... B la IV (1206-1270) was the king of Hungary between 1235 and 1270. ... Combatants Bohemia Hungary Commanders Premysl Ottokar II Bela IV The Battle of Kressenbrunn was fought in July of 1260 between Bohemia and Hungary for the possession of Austria and Styria. ... B la IV (1206-1270) was the king of Hungary between 1235 and 1270. ... This article is about the people. ... King Stephen V of Hungary (Hungarian: , Slovak: Štefan V) (1239 or 1240 – August 6, 1272), was the son of Bela IV of Hungary, whom he succeeded in 1270. ...

England: The Second Barons' War

Henry III (1 October 1207 – 16 November 1272) was the son and successor of John Lackland as King of England, reigning for fifty-six years from 1216 to his death. ... Papal bull of Pope Urban VIII, 1637, sealed with a leaden bulla. ... In 1258 a group of barons, led by Simon de Montfort, 6th Earl of Leicester, forced King Henry III of England to accept a new form of government in which power was placed in the hands of a council of 15 members who were to supervise ministerial appointments, local administration... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... The Second Barons War (1264–1267) was a civil war in England between the forces of a number of rebellious barons lead by Simon de Montfort, against the Royalist forces led by Prince Edward (later Edward I of England). ... Several military conflicts are considered English civil wars: The Anarchy (1135–1154). ... is the 132nd day of the year (133rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... May 14 is the 134th day of the year (135th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Battle of Lewes was a battle fought at Lewes in Sussex, from May 12 to May 14, 1264. ... From the Chamber of the United States House of Representatives Simon V de Montfort, 6th Earl of Leicester (1208 – August 4, 1265) was the principal leader of the baronial opposition to King Henry III of England. ... Henry III (1 October 1207 – 16 November 1272) was the son and successor of John Lackland as King of England, reigning for fifty-six years from 1216 to his death. ... This article refers to the historic county in England. ... Edward I (17 June 1239 – 7 July 1307), popularly known as Longshanks[1], also as Edward the Lawgiver or the English Justinian because of his legal reforms, and as Hammer of the Scots,[2] achieved fame as the monarch who conquered Wales and tried to do the same to Scotland. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... is the 20th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Westminster is a district within the City of Westminster in London. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... The House of Representatives Chamber of the Parliament of Australia in Canberra. ... “Houses of Parliament” redirects here. ... is the 216th day of the year (217th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Battle of Evesham was an important battle in the history of England which took place on August 4, 1265. ... For the condiment, see Worcestershire sauce. ... Bors Dilemma - he chooses to save a maiden rather than his brother Lionel Chivalry[1] is a term related to the medieval institution of knighthood. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... The Dictum of Kenilworth issued in October 1266, was the terms of the supporters of Simon de Montfort for ending their resistance to Henry III of England. ... Henry III (1 October 1207 – 16 November 1272) was the son and successor of John Lackland as King of England, reigning for fifty-six years from 1216 to his death. ...

Political entities

The Duchy of Saxony was a medieval Duchy covering the greater part of Northern Germany. ... Coat of Arms of Lauenburg The Duchy of Lauenburg, also known as Saxe-Lauenburg was a medieval Duchy (Reichsfreiheit) that existed from 1296 in the extreme southeast region of Schleswig-Holstein with its territorial center in the modern district of Lauenburg. ... With an area of 18,400 sq. ... This article is a list of rulers of Norway up until the present, including: The Norwegian kingdom (with the Faroe Islands) The Union with Iceland and Greenland (1262-1814) The Norwegian kingdom (with Iceland, Greenland and the Faroe Islands 1262-1814) The Union of Sweden and Norway (1319-1343) The... For other uses, see Strasburg. ... In the Holy Roman Empire, an imperial free city (in German: freie Reichsstadt) was a city formally responsible to the emperor only — as opposed to the majority of cities in the Empire, which belonged to a territory and were thus governed by one of the many princes (Fürsten) of... This article is about the medieval empire. ... The Icelandic Commonwealth or the Icelandic Free State (Icelandic: Þjóðveldisöld) was the state existing in Iceland between the establishment of the Althing in 930 and the pledge of fealty to the Norwegian king in 1262. ... Håkon IV (1204—December 15, 1263), also called Haakon the Old, was declared to be the son of Håkon III of Norway, the leader of the Birkebeiner, who had seized control over large parts of Norway in 1202. ... Location Time zone CET/CEST (UTC+1/+2) Administration Country NUTS Region DE7 Capital Wiesbaden Largest city Frankfurt Minister-President Roland Koch (CDU) Governing party CDU Votes in Bundesrat 5 (from 69) Basic statistics Area  21,100 km² (8,147 sq mi) Population 6,077,000 (08/2006)[1]  - Density... The Free State of Thuringia (German: Freistaat Thüringen) is located in central Germany and is considered one of the smaller of Germanys sixteen Bundesländer (federal states), with an area of 16,200 km² and 2. ... This article is about the medieval empire. ... This article is about the country. ... Baldwin II (1217—1273) was the last emperor of the Latin Empire of Constantinople. ... The Principality of Achaea was one of the three vassal states of the Latin Empire which replaced the Byzantine Empire after the capture of Constantinople during the Fourth Crusade. ... Statue of Charles I of Anjou by Arnolfo di Cambio, Rome, Palazzo dei Conservatori. ... The Treaty or Treaties of Viterbo was a pair of agreements made by Charles I of Sicily with Baldwin II of Constantinople and William II Villehardouin, Prince of Achaea, in May 1267, which transferred much of the rights to the Latin Empire from Baldwin to Charles. ... Arms of the Latin Empire of Constantinople The Latin Empire with its vassals and the Greek successor states after the partition of the Byzantine Empire, c. ... Wernigerode Castle Wernigerode is a town in Saxony-Anhalt, Germany. ... Margrave (Latin: marchio) is the English and French form (recorded since 1551) of the German title Markgraf (from Mark march and Graf count) and certain equivalent nobiliary (princely) titles in other languages. ... For the similarly spelled Brandenberg, see Brandenberg (Austria) or Brandenburg (disambiguation) Location Coordinates , , Time zone CET/CEST (UTC+1/+2) Administration Country NUTS Region DE4 Capital Potsdam Minister-President Matthias Platzeck (SPD) Governing parties SPD / CDU Votes in Bundesrat 4 (of 69) Basic statistics Area  29,479 km² (11,382...

Political reform

is the 169th day of the year (170th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the legislature abolished in 1801. ... Castledermot (Diseart Diarmad in Irish), meaning Dermots Hermitage) is an inland town in the south-east of Ireland in County Kildare, about 75km from Dublin, and 10km from the town of Carlow. ... Statistics Province: Leinster County Town: Naas Code: KE Area: 1,693 km² Population (2006) 186,075 Website: www. ... A legislatureis a type of representative deliberative assembly with the power to ratify laws. ... Several military conflicts are considered English civil wars: The Anarchy (1135–1154). ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... The Second Barons War (1264–1267) was a civil war in England between the forces of a number of rebellious barons lead by Simon de Montfort, against the Royalist forces led by Prince Edward (later Edward I of England). ... Grand Procession of the Doge, 16th century Doges Palace Complex For some thousand years, the chief magistrate and leader of the Republic of Venice was the Doge (Duke). ... Grand Procession of the Doge, 16th century For about a thousand years, the chief magistrate and leader of the Most Serene Republic of Venice was styled the Doge, a rare but not unique Italian title derived from the Latin Dux, as the major Italian parallel Duce and the English Duke. ... For other uses, see Venice (disambiguation). ... Pope Clement IV (Saint-Gilles-du-Gard, November 23, year uncertain – November 29, 1268 in Viterbo), born Gui Faucoi le Gros (English: Guy Foulques the Fat; Italian: Guido il Grosso), was elected Pope February 15, 1265, in a conclave held at Perugia that took four months, while cardinals argued over... The Sistine Chapel is the location of the conclave. ... For other uses, see Pope (disambiguation). ...

People

Mindaugas King of Lithuania Mindaugas monument in Vilnius Mindaugas (approximate English transcription [ˈmın. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Relation to other religions Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Christianity Portal This box:      Christianity is a monotheistic[1] religion centered on the life and teachings of Jesus of Nazareth as presented in the New Testament. ... Pagan and heathen redirect here. ... Mindaugas King of Lithuania Mindaugas monument in Vilnius Mindaugas (approximate English transcription [ˈmın. ... For other uses, see Christian (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Monarch (disambiguation). ... Grand Duchy of Lithuania Treniota (Troniata) was the Grand Prince of Lithuania from 1263 to 1264, Prince of Black Ruthenia. ... The Peerage of England comprises all peerages created in the Kingdom of England before the Act of Union in 1707. ... The title of Baron de Ros (pronounced Roose) is the most ancient baronial title in the Peerage of England. ... Listen to this article · (info) This audio file was created from the revision dated 2005-06-08, and does not reflect subsequent edits to the article. ... Henry III (1 October 1207 – 16 November 1272) was the son and successor of John Lackland as King of England, reigning for fifty-six years from 1216 to his death. ... Arms used by Llywelyn ap Gruffydd Llywelyn ap Gruffydd or Llywelyn Ein Llyw Olaf (c. ... This article is about the title Prince of Wales. ... By means of the Treaty of Montgomery (1267), Llywelyn ap Gruffydd was able to get his new title Prince of Wales acknowledged by the English king Henry III. Llywelyn ap Gruffydd finished the work his grandfather, Llywelyn the Great, had started: by force and diplomacy all the other Welsh dynasties... is the 302nd day of the year (303rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Portrait of Conradin from the Codex Manesse (Folio 7r). ... Arms of the Hohenstaufen Dynasty The Hohenstaufen (or the Staufer(s)) were a dynasty of Kings of Germany, many of whom were also crowned Holy Roman Emperor and Dukes of Swabia. ... The following list of German Kings and Emperors is one of several Wikipedia lists of incumbents. ... The Holy Roman Emperor was, with some variation, the ruler of the Holy Roman Empire, the predecessor of modern Germany, during its existence from the 10th century until its collapse in 1806. ... Frederick I, Margrave of Baden (1249 – October 29, 1268, margrave from October 4, 1250), the only son of Margrave Herman VI of Baden and of Gertrude of Austria (the niece of Duke Frederick II the Quarrelsome of Austria), grew up at the Bavarian court with his friend Conradin. ... Statue of Charles I of Anjou by Arnolfo di Cambio, Rome, Palazzo dei Conservatori. ... Also see:  Early Modern France The House of Bourbon is an important European royal house, a branch of the Capetian dynasty. ... Robert of France (1256 – February 7, 1317) was made Count of Clermont in 1268. ... Louis IX (25 April 1215 – 25 August 1270), commonly Saint Louis, was King of France from 1226 to his death. ... Beatrice of Burgundy (1257 – October 1, 1310 was Lady of Bourbon and, through her mother, heiress of all Bourbon estates. ... Otakar II (also spelled Ottokar or PÅ™emysl Otakar/Ottokar) (c. ... Coat of arms of the Dukes of Carinthia, today state coat The Duchy of Carinthia (German language: Kärnten, Slovenian: KoroÅ¡ka) was a duchy of the Holy Roman Empire until its dissolution in 1806, and a crownland of Austria-Hungary until it dissolved in 1918. ... Carniola English and Latin; (Slovenian Kranjska, German Krain) is a name for a region in Slovenia. ... This article is about the medieval empire. ...

Asia and Africa

Mongol Empire

is the 125th day of the year (126th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Kublai Khan (disambiguation). ... Expansion of the Mongol Empire Historical map of the Mongol Empire (1300~1405), the gray area is Timurid dynasty. ... is the 246th day of the year (247th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Mongols (disambiguation). ... An Ottoman Mamluk, from 1810 Mamluks (or Mameluks) (the Arabic word usually translates as owned, singular: مملوك plural: مماليك) comprised slave soldiers used by the Muslim Caliphs and the Ottoman Empire, and who on more than one occasion seized power for themselves. ... Combatants Egyptian Mamluks Mongols Commanders Saif ad-Din Qutuz, Baibars C * Kitbuqa + Strength About 20,000-30,000 About 10,000-20,000 The Battle of Ain Jalut (or Ayn Jalut, in Arabic: عين جالوت, the Eye of Goliath or the Spring of Goliath) took place on September 3, 1260 between the... Hulagu Khan, also known as Hulagu, Hülegü or Hulegu (Chinese: ; pinyin: ; Chaghatay/Persian: ; Arabic:هولاكو; c. ... The Golden Horde (Mongolian: Altan Ordyn Uls; Tatar: ; Russian: ) is a Russian designation for the Mongol[1][2][3] — later Turkicized[4] — khanate established in the western part of the Mongol Empire after the Mongol invasion of Rus in the 1240s: present-day Russia, Ukraine, Kazakhstan, and the Caucasus. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Caucasus Mountains. ... Expansion of the Mongol Empire Historical map of the Mongol Empire (1300~1405), the gray area is Timurid dynasty. ... Thracian Tomb of Kazanlak  Thrace (Bulgarian: , Greek: , Attic Greek: ThrāíkÄ“ or ThrēíkÄ“, Latin: , Turkish: ) is a historical and geographic area in southeast Europe. ... Byzantium (Greek: Βυζάντιον) was an ancient Greek city, which, according to legend, was founded by Greek colonists from Megara in 667 BC and named after their king Byzas or Byzantas (Βύζας or Βύζαντας in Greek). ... Nogai Khan (died 1299), also called Kara Nogai (Black Nogai), was a Khan of the Golden Horde and a great-grandson of Genghis Khan. ... Marco Polo (September 15, 1254[1] – January 9, 1324 at earliest but no later than June 1325[2]) was a Venetian trader and explorer who gained fame for his worldwide travels, recorded in the book Il Milione (The Million or The Travels of Marco Polo). ... Marco Polo (September 15, 1254[1] – January 9, 1324 at earliest but no later than June 1325[2]) was a Venetian trader and explorer who gained fame for his worldwide travels, recorded in the book Il Milione (The Million or The Travels of Marco Polo). ... For other uses, see Kublai Khan (disambiguation). ... Khanbaliq or Cambuluc (great residence of the Khan) is the ancient Mongol name[1] for the city at the present location of Beijing, the current capital of the Peoples Republic of China. ... Peking redirects here. ... For other uses, see Pope (disambiguation). ... Expansion of the Mongol Empire Historical map of the Mongol Empire (1300~1405), the gray area is Timurid dynasty. ... Combatants Song Dynasty Yuan Dynasty Commanders Lü Wenhuan Li Tingzhi Liu Zheng, Ashu, Shi Tianzhe, Guo Kan Strength unknown 100,000+ Cavalry 5,000 ships 100+ trebuchet 20+ counterweight trebuchet Casualties unknown unknown The Battle of Xiangyang (襄陽之戰) was a six-year battle between invading Mongol armies and Southern Song Chinese... Northern Song in 1111 AD Capital Bianjing (汴京) (960–1127) Linan (臨安) (1127–1276) Language(s) Chinese Religion Buddhism, Taoism, Confucianism Government Monarchy Emperor  - 960–976 Emperor Taizu  - 1126–1127 Emperor Qinzong  - 1127–1162 Emperor Gaozong  - 1278–1279 Emperor Bing History  - Zhao Kuangyin taking over the throne of the Later Zhou... Expansion of the Mongol Empire Historical map of the Mongol Empire (1300~1405), the gray area is Timurid dynasty. ... For other uses, see Kublai Khan (disambiguation). ... Hubei (Chinese: 湖北; Hanyu Pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Hu-pei; Postal System Pinyin: Hupeh) is a central province of the Peoples Republic of China. ... For other uses, see Kublai Khan (disambiguation). ... This wooden Kongorikishi statue was created during the Kamakura shogunate during 14th century Japan. ... Russian prince Taking Tribute, by Nicholas Roerich, 1908 (Moscow). ... Expansion of the Mongol Empire Historical map of the Mongol Empire (1300~1405), the gray area is Timurid dynasty. ... Events May 7 - In France the Second Council of Lyons opens to consider the condition of the Holy Land and to agree to a union with the Byzantine church. ...

Mamluk sultanate of Egypt

is the 246th day of the year (247th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Combatants Egyptian Mamluks Mongols Commanders Saif ad-Din Qutuz, Baibars C * Kitbuqa + Strength About 20,000-30,000 About 10,000-20,000 The Battle of Ain Jalut (or Ayn Jalut, in Arabic: عين جالوت, the Eye of Goliath or the Spring of Goliath) took place on September 3, 1260 between the... is the 297th day of the year (298th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Saif ad-Din Qutuz (died October 24, 1260) was the Mamluk sultan of Egypt from 1259 until his death. ... This is an list of persons who were assassinated; that is, important people who were murdered, usually for ideological or political reasons. ... al-Malik al-Zahir Rukn al-Din Baibars al-Bunduqdari (also spelled Baybars) (Arabic: ) was a Mamluk Sultan of Egypt and Syria. ... A puppet state is a state whose government, though notionally of the same culture as the governed people - owes its existence (or other major debt) to being installed, supported or controlled by a more powerful entity, typically a foreign power. ... For main article see: Caliphate The Caliph (pronounced khaleef in Arabic) is the head of state in a Caliphate, and the title for the leader of the Islamic Ummah, an Islamic community ruled by the Sharia. ... For other uses, see Cairo (disambiguation). ... The ruins of the Crusader castle in Byblos. ... Toron, now Tibnin in southern Lebanon, was a major Crusader castle, built in the mountains on the road from Tyre to Damascus. ... The Crusader states, c. ... The Kingdom of Cilician Armenia, 1199-1375. ... is the 138th day of the year (139th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Principality of Antioch in the context of the other states of the Near East in 1135 AD. The Principality of Antioch, including parts of modern-day Turkey and Syria, was one of the crusader states created during the First Crusade. ... The Near East in 1135, with the Crusader states in green hues. ... In 1260 Baibars, the Sultan of Egypt and Syria, began to threaten the crusader state of Antioch, which (as a vassal of the Armenians) had supported the Mongols, the traditional enemies of the Turks. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Antakya. ...

Byzantine Empire

is the 206th day of the year (207th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the city before the Fall of Constantinople (1453). ... The Empire of Nicaea was the largest of the states founded by refugees from the Byzantine Empire after Constantinople was conquered during the Fourth Crusade. ... The Byzantine Empire in 1265 (William R. Shepherd, Historical Atlas, 1911) Michael VIII (1225 – December 11, 1282) was the founder of the Palaeologos dynasty that would rule the Byzantine Empire to the Fall of Constantinople in 1453. ... Byzantine redirects here. ... The White Tower The Arch of Galerius Map showing the Thessaloníki prefecture Thessaloníki (Θεσσαλονίκη) is the second-largest city of Greece and is the principal city and the capital of the Greek region of Macedonia. ... Arms of the Latin Empire of Constantinople The Latin Empire with its vassals and the Greek successor states after the partition of the Byzantine Empire, c. ...

North Africa

The Almohad Dynasty (From Arabic الموحدون al-Muwahhidun, i. ... For main article see: Caliphate The Caliph (pronounced khaleef in Arabic) is the head of state in a Caliphate, and the title for the leader of the Islamic Ummah, an Islamic community ruled by the Sharia. ...  Northern Africa (UN subregion)  geographic, including above North Africa or Northern Africa is the northernmost region of the African continent, separated by the Sahara from Sub-Saharan Africa. ... Al-Andalus is the Arabic name given the Iberian Peninsula by its Muslim conquerors; it refers to both the Caliphate proper and the general period of Muslim rule (711–1492). ... For other uses, see moor. ... Marrakech (مراكش marrākish), known as the Pearl of the South, is a city in southwestern Morocco in the foothills of the Atlas Mountains. ... Language(s) Berber languages Religion(s) Islam (mostly Sunni), Christianity (mostly protestant), Judaism Imazighen(in Kabyle and other Berber languages: Imaziγen) are the indigenous peoples of North Africa west of the Nile Valley. ... Marinid was the Dynasty that replaced the Almohad Dynasty in Morocco in 1196. ...

South Asia

The Sena dynasty ruled Bengal through the 11th and 12th centuries. ... For other uses, see Bengal (disambiguation). ... This article discusses the adherents of Hinduism. ... , Bombay redirects here. ... Malik ul Salih established the first Muslim state of Samudera Pasai in the year 1267. ... For people named Islam, see Islam (name). ...

Culture

Science, literature, and industry

For the Arthur Sullivan oratorio, see The Golden Legend (oratorio). ... The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times. ... The Book of Aneirin (Welsh: Llyfr Aneirin) is a late 13th century Welsh manuscript containing Old and Middle Welsh poetry attributed to the late 6th century Northern Brythonic poet, Aneirin. ... This article is about the country. ... A manuscript (Latin manu scriptus, written by hand), strictly speaking, is any written document that is put down by hand, in contrast to being printed or reproduced some other way. ... This article is about the art form. ... A 16th century brewer A 21st century brewer This article concerns the production of alcoholic beverages. ... Budweiser Budvar is marketed under the label Czechvar in North America Budějovický Budvar is marketed under its real name in Australia Budweiser is the name of a pilsner-style beer from the city of České Budějovice in Bohemia (Czech Republic), brewed since 1265. ... For other uses, see Beer (disambiguation). ... Flag of Bohemia Bohemia (Czech: ; German: ) is a historical region in central Europe, occupying the western and middle thirds of the Czech Republic. ... GOLD refers to one of the following: GOLD (IEEE) is an IEEE program designed to garner more student members at the university level (Graduates of the Last Decade). ... The term écu may refer to one of several French coins. ... This article is about the chemical element. ... Ë: The term Grosz may also refer to George Grosz. ... For the Nova Scotia premier see Roger Bacon (politician). ... Pope Clement IV (Saint-Gilles-du-Gard, November 23, year uncertain – November 29, 1268 in Viterbo), born Gui Faucoi le Gros (English: Guy Foulques the Fat; Italian: Guido il Grosso), was elected Pope February 15, 1265, in a conclave held at Perugia that took four months, while cardinals argued over... For other meanings of mathematics or uses of math and maths, see Mathematics (disambiguation) and Math (disambiguation). ... For the book by Sir Isaac Newton, see Opticks. ... For other uses, see Alchemy (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Astronomy (disambiguation). ... Hand-coloured version of the anonymous Flammarion woodcut (1888). ... A magnifying glass (called a hand lens in laboratory contexts) is a convex lens which is used to produce a magnified image of an object. ... Hop umbel (branched floral structure resembling nested-inverted umbrellas) in a Hallertau hop yard Hops are a flower used primarily as a flavouring and stability agent in beer, as well as in herbal medicine. ... For other uses, see Beer (disambiguation). ... Magnetic lines of force of a bar magnet shown by iron filings on paper A magnet is an object that has a magnetic field. ... In physics, a magnetic monopole is a hypothetical particle that may be loosely described as a magnet with only one pole (see electromagnetic theory for more on magnetic poles). ...

Art, architecture, and music

is the 297th day of the year (298th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Cathedral of Chartres (Cathedral of Our Lady of Chartres, French: Cathédrale Notre-Dame de Chartres), located in Chartres, about 50 miles (80 km) from Paris, is considered one of the finest examples in all France of the Gothic style of architecture. ... Louis IX (25 April 1215 – 25 August 1270), commonly Saint Louis, was King of France from 1226 to his death. ... UNESCO (United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization) is a specialized agency of the United Nations established in 1945. ... A UNESCO World Heritage Site is a specific site (such as a forest, mountain, lake, desert, monument, building, complex, or city) that has been nominated and confirmed for inclusion on the list maintained by the international World Heritage Programme administered by the UNESCO World Heritage Committee, composed of 21 State... Dunkeld Cathedral Dunkeld Cathedral stands on the north bank of the River Tay in Dunkeld, Perthshire, Scotland. ... Perthshire (Siorrachd Pheairt in Gaelic) was a county in central Scotland, which extended from Strathmore in the east, to the Pass of Drumochter in the north, Rannoch Moor and Ben Lui in the west, and Aberfoyle in the south. ... This article is about the country. ... Meißen, internationally most known for porcelain, is a town of approximately 35,000 near Dresden on the river Elbe in the State of Saxony in the southern part of eastern Germany. ... Capital Schwerin Government Principality Historical era Middle Ages  - Established 1161  - Partitioned to Schwerin     and Sch-Wittenburg   1279  - Partitioned to create     Sch-Boizenburg   1323  - Inherited Tecklenburg 1328  - Sch-Schwerin comital line     extinct   1344  - Sch-Wburg-Bburg extinct 1349  - Comital line extinct; sold     to Mecklenburg-Schwerin   1358 Capital Schwerin Government... Nicola Pisano (c. ... For other uses, see Pisa (disambiguation). ... The Campo dei Miracoli (Field of Miracles) is a wide, walled area at the heart of the city of Pisa, Tuscany, Italy, recognized as one of the main centers for medieval art in the world. ... This article is about a decorative art. ... Florence (Italian, Firenze) is a city in the center of Tuscany, in central Italy, on the Arno River, with a population of around 400,000, plus a suburban population in excess of 200,000. ... San Miniato al Monte and the Bishops Palace The Basilica di San Miniato al Monte (Basilica of St Minias on the Mountain) stands atop one of the highest points in Florence, and has been described as the finest Romanesque structure in Tuscany and one of the most beautiful churches... Music theory is a field of study that investigates the nature or mechanics of music. ... Franco of Cologne (fl. ... Adam de la Halle (also known as Adam le Bossu (Adam the Hunchback) 1237?-1288) was a French-born trouvère, poet and musician, who broke with the long-established tradition of writing liturgical poetry and music to be an early founder of secular theater in France. ... Operetta is a genre of light opera, light in terms both of music and subject matter. ... The Savoy Palace was considered the grandest noblemans residence of medieval London, until it was destroyed in the uprising of 1381. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Peter II of Savoy (1203 - 1268) was Count of Savoy from 1263 until his death, and built the Savoy Palace in London. ... Khanbaliq or Cambuluc (great residence of the Khan) is the ancient Mongol name[1] for the city at the present location of Beijing, the current capital of the Peoples Republic of China. ... Peking redirects here. ... For other uses, see Kublai Khan (disambiguation). ... Expansion of the Mongol Empire Historical map of the Mongol Empire (1300~1405), the gray area is Timurid dynasty. ... Nicola Pisano (c. ... For other uses, see Octagon (disambiguation). ... The western facade of Reims Cathedral, France. ... For other uses of Ambo, see Ambo, Ethiopia, Kom Ombo, ambulance Ambo (band). ... Duomo di Siena is the medieval cathedral of Siena, Italy. ... Blair Castle Blair Castle is a castle in the village of Blair Atholl on Tayside in Scotland. ... This article is about the country. ...

Cities and institutions

King Mengrai (or Mangrai) (1239-1317) was the founder of the Lao kingdom Lannathai. ... Lannathai (often short Lanna, English One Million Thai Rice Fields, Thai ล้านนาไทย) was a kingdom in the north of Thailand around the city of Chiang Mai. ... Nakhon Chiang Rai, showing the ancient city walls and more recent gates : Pratu Nang Ing (ประตูนางอิง) Pratu Chiang Mai (ประตูเชียงใหม่) Pratu Wai (ประตูหวาย) Pratu Pa Daeng (ประตูป่าแดัง) Pratu Pi (ประตูผี) Pratu Kha Tam (ประตูขะต๊ำ) Pratu Tha Nak (ประตูท่านาค) Pratu Tha Sai (ประตูท่าทราย) Pratu Tho (ประตูท่อ) Pratu Yang Soeng (ประตูยางเสิ้ง) Pratu Jao Chai (ประตูเจ้าชาย) Pratu Sri (ประตูสรี) Nakhon Chiang Rai (Thai เชียงราย; locally also... and of the Balliol College College name Balliol College Named after John de Balliol Established 1263 Sister college St Johns College, Cambridge Master Andrew Graham JCR President Helen Lochead Undergraduates 403 MCR President Chelsea Payne Graduates 228 Location of Balliol College within central Oxford , Homepage Boatclub Balliol College (pronounced... and of the Merton College College name The House of Scholars of Merton Named after Walter de Merton Established 1264 Sister college Peterhouse, Cambridge Warden Prof. ... The University of Oxford (informally Oxford University), located in the city of Oxford, England, is the oldest university in the English-speaking world. ... Walter de Merton (c. ... For other uses, see Kublai Khan (disambiguation). ... Expansion of the Mongol Empire Historical map of the Mongol Empire (1300~1405), the gray area is Timurid dynasty. ... Harhorin (Хархорин), or Khara Khorum in Classical Mongolian, is a town in Övörhangay aymag, Mongolia. ... Khanbaliq or Cambuluc (great residence of the Khan) is the ancient Mongol name[1] for the city at the present location of Beijing, the current capital of the Peoples Republic of China. ... Peking redirects here. ... For other uses, see Cairo (disambiguation). ... This article is about the natural seismic phenomenon. ... The Kingdom of Cilician Armenia, 1199-1375. ...

Religion

Christianity

The Flagellants were a 13th and 14th century Christian movement. ... is the 241st day of the year (242nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Urban IV, né Jacques Pantaléon ( 1195 - October 2, 1264), pope (1261-1264), was the son of a cobbler of Troyes, France, studied theology and common law in Paris, became bishop of Verdun, was employed in various missions by Innocent IV, and was made Patriarch of Jerusalem by Alexander IV... For other uses, see Pope (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Cardinal (disambiguation). ... Wurmsbach Abbey (Kloster Mariazell-Wurmsbach) is a Cistercian nunnery located in Bollingen near Rapperswil, in the Canton of St. ... Saint Richard of Chichester (also known as Richard de Wych or variations thereof) (Droitwich, 1197 – 1253 in Dover) is a saint (canonized 1262) who was Bishop of Chichester. ... This article discusses the process of declaring saints. ... Saints redirects here. ... Godspell is a 1970 play by John-Michael Tebelak. ... Theology finds its scholars pursuing the understanding of and providing reasoned discourse of religion, spirituality and God or the gods. ... Joachim of Flora (medieval engraving). ... Heresy, as a blanket term, describes a practice or belief that is labeled as unorthodox. ... Catholic Church redirects here. ... A synod (also known as a council) is a council of a church, usually a Christian church, convened to decide an issue of doctrine, administration or application. ... Coordinates Administration Country Region Provence-Alpes-Côte dAzur Department Bouches-du-Rhône (Subprefecture) Arrondissement Arles Canton Chief town of 2 cantons: Arles-Est and Arles-Ouest Intercommunality Agglomeration community of Arles-Crau-Camargue-Montagnette Mayor Hervé Schiavetti (PS) (2001-2008) Statistics Altitude 0 m–57 m (avg. ... Aquinas redirects here. ... Theology finds its scholars pursuing the understanding of and providing reasoned discourse of religion, spirituality and God or the gods. ... The Summa contra Gentiles (hereafter referred to as SCG) was written by St. ... Pope Clement IV (Saint-Gilles-du-Gard, November 23, year uncertain – November 29, 1268 in Viterbo), born Gui Faucoi le Gros (English: Guy Foulques the Fat; Italian: Guido il Grosso), was elected Pope February 15, 1265, in a conclave held at Perugia that took four months, while cardinals argued over... Pope Benedict XVIs Ring The Ring of the Fisherman, also known as the Piscatory Ring and the Pescatorio (in Italian), is an official part of the regalia worn by the Pope, who is described by the Roman Catholic Church (of which he is the head) as the successor of... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Papal bull of Pope Urban VIII, 1637, sealed with a leaden bulla. ... For other uses, see Carnival (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Venice (disambiguation). ... Eastern Orthodoxy (also called Greek Orthodoxy and Russian Orthodoxy) is a Christian tradition which represents the majority of Eastern Christianity. ... The Patriarch of Antioch is one of the Eastern Orthodox patriarchs, sometimes called the Greek Patriarch of Antioch to distinguish from the Oriental Orthodox Syrian Patriarch of Antioch. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Antakya. ... The Latin Patriarch of Antioch was an office established in the aftermath of the First Crusade by Bohemund, the first Prince of Antioch. ...

Judaism

Nahmanides (1194 - c. ... For the town in Italy, see Rabbi, Italy. ... This article is about the Spanish Autonomous Community. ... The Talmud (Hebrew: ) is a record of rabbinic discussions pertaining to Jewish law, ethics, customs, and history. ... In the scholastic system of education of the middle ages, disputations (in Latin: disputationes, singular: disputatio) offered a formalized method of debate designed to uncover and establish truths in theology and in other sciences. ... Friar Paul Christian (Pablo Christiani) was born to a pious Jewish family wih the name Saul. ... James I of Aragon. ... Gilbert de Clare, 7th Earl of Hertford and 3rd Earl of Gloucester was born 2 September 1243, at Christchurch, Hampshire. ... Canterbury is a cathedral city in east Kent in South East England and is the seat of the Archbishop of Canterbury, the Primate of All England, head of the Church of England and of the worldwide Anglican Communion. ... BolesÅ‚aw Wstydliwy Boleslaus the Chaste or the Shy (Polish: BolesÅ‚aw Wstydliwy) (21 June 1226 O.S. – 7 December 1279 O.S.) was the son of Leszek the White. ... For other uses, see Jew (disambiguation). ... This article is about the Christian religious act of Baptism. ... Location Coordinates : Time Zone : CET (GMT +1) - summer: CEST (GMT +2) General information Native name Barcelona (Catalan) Spanish name Barcelona Nickname Ciutat Comtal (City of Counts) Postal code 08001–08080 Area code 34 (Spain) + 93 (Barcelona) Website http://www. ... “Dominicans” redirects here. ... The Talmud (Hebrew: ) is a record of rabbinic discussions pertaining to Jewish law, ethics, customs, and history. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Relation to other religions Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Christianity Portal This box:      Christianity is a monotheistic[1] religion centered on the life and teachings of Jesus of Nazareth as presented in the New Testament. ... For other uses, see Vienna (disambiguation). ... Compulsory Jewish badge under the Nazi occupation of Europe: the Star of David with the word Jew inside (this one in German) A yellow badge, also referred to as a Jewish badge, was a mandatory mark or a piece of cloth of specific geometric shape, worn on the outer garment... is the 170th day of the year (171st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Louis IX (25 April 1215 – 25 August 1270), commonly Saint Louis, was King of France from 1226 to his death. ... Compulsory Jewish badge under the Nazi occupation of Europe: the Star of David with the word Jew inside (this one in German) A yellow badge, also referred to as a Jewish badge, was a mandatory mark or a piece of cloth of specific geometric shape, worn on the outer garment... The livre tournois (or Tournoise pound) was a currency used in France, named after the town of Tours, in which it was minted. ... This article is about the chemical element. ...

Buddhism

The Sukhothai kingdom was a kingdom in the north of Thailand around the city Sukhothai. ... Theravada (Pāli: theravāda (cf Sanskrit: स्थविरवाद sthaviravāda); literally, the Teaching of the Elders, or the Ancient Teaching) is the oldest surviving Buddhist school, and for many centuries has been the predominant religion of Sri Lanka (about 70% of the population[1]) and most of continental Southeast Asia (Cambodia... Buddhism is a variety of teachings described as a religion[1] or way of life. ...

Births

Clement V, born Bertrand de Goth (also occasionally spelled Gouth and Got) (1264 – April 20, 1314), was Pope from 1305 to his death. ... Events June 24 - Battle of Bannockburn. ... May 14 is the 134th day of the year (135th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Dante redirects here. ... Events Births September 29 - John of Artois, Count of Eu, French soldier (d. ...

Deaths

is the 318th day of the year (319th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Alexander Nevsky (disambiguation). ... The title Grand Prince (Latin, Magnus Princeps; German, Großfürst, Finnish Suuriruhtinas, Swedish Storfurste, Lithuanian Didysis kunigaikÅ¡tis, Russian Великий князь Velikii kniaz) ranks in honour below Emperor and Tsar but higher than a sovereign Prince (Fürst) or Royal Prince. ... Velikiy Novgorod (Russian: ) is the foremost historic city of North-Western Russia, situated on the M10(E95) federal highway connecting Moscow and St. ... Population 315,954 (2002) Time zone Moscow (MSK/MSD), UTC +0300 (MSK)/+0400 (MSD) Latitude/Longitude Vladimir (Russian: ) is an old city in Russia. ... is the 275th day of the year (276th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Urban IV, born Jacques Pantaléon (Troyes, ca. ... is the 39th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Hulagu Khan, also known as Hulagu, Hülegü or Hulegu (Chinese: ; pinyin: ; Chaghatay/Persian: ; Arabic:هولاكو; c. ... Expansion of the Mongol Empire Historical map of the Mongol Empire (1300~1405), the gray area is Timurid dynasty. ... This article is about the title. ... April 9 - Peter of Courtenay crowned emperor of the Latin Empire of Constantinople at Rome, by Pope Honorius III May 20 - First Barons War, royalist victory at Lincoln. ... is the 216th day of the year (217th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... From the Chamber of the United States House of Representatives Simon V de Montfort, 6th Earl of Leicester (1208 – August 4, 1265) was the principal leader of the baronial opposition to King Henry III of England. ... Berke was the ruler of the Golden Horde from 1257 to 1266, in the aftermath of the reign of his brother Batu Khan. ... This article is about the title. ... The Golden Horde (Mongolian: Altan Ordyn Uls; Tatar: ; Russian: ) is a Russian designation for the Mongol[1][2][3] — later Turkicized[4] — khanate established in the western part of the Mongol Empire after the Mongol invasion of Rus in the 1240s: present-day Russia, Ukraine, Kazakhstan, and the Caucasus. ... Expansion of the Mongol Empire Historical map of the Mongol Empire (1300~1405), the gray area is Timurid dynasty. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... For other uses, see Stockholm (disambiguation). ... is the 302nd day of the year (303rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Portrait of Conradin from the Codex Manesse (Folio 7r). ... Germany, showing modern borders. ... This is a list of Kings of Jerusalem, from 1099 to 1291, as well as claimants to the title up to the present day. ... Sicily ( in Italian and Sicilian) is an autonomous region of Italy and the largest island in the Mediterranean Sea, with an area of 25,708 km² (9,926 sq. ... For broader historical context, see 1250s and 13th century. ...

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m