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Encyclopedia > 1250s
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Centuries:
12th century - 13th century - 14th century
Decades:

1220s 1230s 1240s - 1250s - 1260s 1270s 1280s These pages contain the trends of millennia and centuries. ... (11th century - 12th century - 13th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 12th century was that century which lasted from 1101 to 1200. ... (12th century - 13th century - 14th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 13th century was that century which lasted from 1201 to 1300. ... Jump to: navigation, search This 14th-century statue from south India depicts the gods Shiva (on the left) and Uma (on the right}. It is housed in the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C. As a means of recording the passage of time, the 14th century was that century which... This is a list of decades which have articles with more information about them. ... Jump to: navigation, search Centuries: 12th century - 13th century - 14th century Decades: 1170s 1180s 1190s 1200s 1210s - 1220s - 1230s 1240s 1250s 1260s 1270s Years: 1220 1221 1222 1223 1224 1225 1226 1227 1228 1229 Events and Trends Categories: 1220s ... Jump to: navigation, search Centuries: 12th century - 13th century - 14th century Decades: 1180s 1190s 1200s 1210s 1220s - 1230s - 1240s 1250s 1260s 1270s 1280s Years: 1230 1231 1232 1233 1234 1235 1236 1237 1238 1239 Events and Trends Categories: 1230s ... Jump to: navigation, search Centuries: 12th century - 13th century - 14th century Decades: 1190s 1200s 1210s 1220s 1230s - 1240s - 1250s 1260s 1270s 1280s 1290s Years: 1240 1241 1242 1243 1244 1245 1246 1247 1248 1249 Events and Trends Hungary was partially demolished with a great loss of life in 1241–1242... Centuries: 12th century - 13th century - 14th century Decades: 1210s 1220s 1230s 1240s 1250s - 1260s - 1270s 1280s 1290s 1300s 1310s Years: 1260 1261 1262 1263 1264 1265 1266 1267 1268 1269 Events and Trends Categories: 1260s ... Centuries: 12th century - 13th century - 14th century Decades: 1210s 1220s 1230s 1240s 1250s - 1260s - 1270s 1280s 1290s 1300s 1310s Years: 1270 1271 1272 1273 1274 1275 1276 1277 1278 1279 Events and Trends Categories: 1270s ... The 1280s is the decade starting January 1, 1280 and ending December 31, 1289. ...

Years:

1250 1251 1252 1253 1254 1255 1256 1257 1258 1259 Events December 13 - Death of Frederick II, Holy Roman Emperor Louis IX of France is captured by Muslims and has to ransom himself Mabinogion appears Albertus Magnus isolates the element arsenic Vincent of Beauvais writes proto-encyclopedic The Greater Mirror City of Stockholm founded Alphonso III of Portugal takes Algarve... Events First Shepherds Crusade Births Deaths Monarchs/Presidents Aragon - James I King of Aragon and count of Barcelona (reigned from 1213 to 1276) Castile - Ferdinand III, the Saint King of Castile and Leon (reigned from 1217 to 1252) Categories: 1251 ... Jump to: navigation, search For broader historical context, see 1250s and 13th century. ... For broader historical context, see 1250s and 13th century. ... Jump to: navigation, search For broader historical context, see 1250s and 13th century. ... Events Königsberg was founded Births Emperor Albert I of Germany, in July Deaths Monarchs/Presidents Aragon - James I King of Aragon and count of Barcelona (reigned from 1213 to 1276) Categories: 1255 ... Jump to: navigation, search For broader historical context, see 1250s and 13th century. ... Jump to: navigation, search For broader historical context, see 1250s and 13th century. ... Events= February 10 - Mongols overrun Baghdad, burning it to the ground and killing 800,000 citizens Llywelyn the Last declares himself Prince of Wales. ... For broader historical context, see 1250s and 13th century. ...

The 1250s is the decade starting January 1, 1250 and ending December 31, 1259. Jump to: navigation, search January 1 is the first day of the calendar year in both the Julian and Gregorian calendars. ... Events December 13 - Death of Frederick II, Holy Roman Emperor Louis IX of France is captured by Muslims and has to ransom himself Mabinogion appears Albertus Magnus isolates the element arsenic Vincent of Beauvais writes proto-encyclopedic The Greater Mirror City of Stockholm founded Alphonso III of Portugal takes Algarve... Jump to: navigation, search December 31 is the 365th day of the year (366th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... For broader historical context, see 1250s and 13th century. ...


The decade was perhaps most dominated by the Mongols, who under the leadership of Möngke Khan continued their rapid expansion throughout Asia both to the east and west of their home territories. The Mongols destroyed the Kingdom of Dali in Laos, and captured the Goryeo kingdom in Korea, eastern Galicia in Europe, Anatolia in Turkey, and the Islamic center of Baghdad, where tens or hundreds of thousands were killed as the city was burned to the ground. In Thailand the Lannathai kingdom was founded. In Japan, a new sect of Buddhism was formed, while in Korea the carving of Buddhist scriptures on 81,000 wooden blocks was completed. The Mongols are an ethnic group that originated in what is now Mongolia, Russia, and China, particularly Inner Mongolia. ... Möngke Khan (1208-1259, also transliterated as Mongke, Mongka, Möngka, Mangu) was the fourth khan of the Mongol Empire. ... Jump to: navigation, search World map showing Asia (geographically) Asia is the central and eastern part of Eurasia and worlds largest continent. ... Dali (大理 pinyin: Dàlǐ) was a Bai kingdom centered in what is now Yunnan Province of the Peoples Republic of China. ... The Goryeo (also Koryo) kingdom ruled Korea from the fall of Silla in 935 until the founding of Joseon in 1392. ... Jump to: navigation, search Korea (Hangul: 한국, Hanguk, used by South Korea; ì¡°ì„ , Joseon, used by North Korea) refers to South Korea (Republic of Korea) and North Korea (Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea) together, which were a unified country until 1945. ... The Kingdom of Galicia and Lodomeria, or simply Galicia, was the largest and northernmost province of Austria from 1772 until 1918, with Lemberg (Lwów, Lviv) as its capital city. ... World map showing Europe (geographically) When considered a continent, Europe is the worlds second-smallest continent in terms of area, with an area of 10,600,000 km² (4,140,625 square miles), making it larger than Australia only. ... Jump to: navigation, search Asia Minor lies east of the Bosporus, between the Black Sea and the Mediterranean. ... Jump to: navigation, search Islam [â–¶] (Arabic: الإسلام al-islām) the submission to God is a monotheistic faith, one of the Abrahamic religions, the worlds second-largest religion, and the fastest growing religion in the world. ... Jump to: navigation, search Image:Baghdad City. ... Lannathai (often short Lanna, English One Million Thai Rice Fields, Thai ล้านนาไทย) was a kingdom in the north of Thailand around the city of Chiang Mai. ... Jump to: navigation, search Korea (Hangul: 한국, Hanguk, used by South Korea; ì¡°ì„ , Joseon, used by North Korea) refers to South Korea (Republic of Korea) and North Korea (Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea) together, which were a unified country until 1945. ...


Europe noted several important cultural milestones, including the completion of several important cathedrals and the beginning of construction of others, as well as the founding of the Collège de Sorbonne at the University of Paris. Significant political developments in Europe included the lack of a Holy Roman Emperor for most of the decade, further erosion of the power of the monarchy in England and Portugal, the end of the failed Seventh Crusade in Egypt, and the expulsion of the Jews from France and the Moors from Portugal. In religion, a papal bull authorized the use of torture in the Medieval Inquisition, and the Catholic church clarified the concept of purgatory. Several important modern cities, including Stockholm and Lviv, were founded in the 1250s. A cathedral is a Christian church building, specifically of a denomination with an episcopal hierarchy (such as the Roman Catholic Church or the Lutheran or Anglican churches), which serves as the central church of a bishopric. ... The Sorbonne, Paris, in a 17th century engraving The historic University of Paris (French: Université de Paris) first appeared in the second half of the 12th century, but was in 1970 reorganized as 13 autonomous universities (University of Paris I–XIII). ... The Holy Roman Emperor was, with some variation, the ruler of the Holy Roman Empire, the predecessor of modern Germany, during its existence from the 10th century until its collapse in 1806. ... Jump to: navigation, search A monarchy, (from the Greek monos, one, and archein, to rule) is a form of government that has a monarch as Head of State. ... Jump to: navigation, search Royal motto (French): Dieu et mon droit (Translated: God and my right) Englands location within the UK Official language English de facto Capital London de facto Largest city London Area - Total Ranked 1st UK 130,395 km² Population - Total (mid-2004) - Density Ranked 1st UK... The Seventh Crusade was a crusade led by Louis IX of France from 1248 to 1254. ... Jump to: navigation, search The Moors were the medieval Muslim inhabitants of al-Andalus (the Iberian Peninsula including the present day Spain and Portugal) and the Maghreb, whose culture is often called Moorish. Juba II king of Mauretania // Origins of the name The name derives from the old Berber (barbarian... Papal bull of Pope Urban VIII, 1637, sealed with a leaden bulla. ... Jump to: navigation, search The Iron Maiden of Nuremberg was a famous torture device, though misconceptions about it do exist. ... Pedro Berruguete. ... The Roman Catholic Church believes its founding was based on Jesus appointment of Saint Peter as the primary church leader, later Bishop of Rome. ... Jump to: navigation, search eqweeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeh|Roman Catholic]] theology, Purgatory is a process of purification after the particular judgment and before entry into Heaven. ... Jump to: navigation, search The Old town in Stockholm from the air Stockholm [â–¶] is the capital of Sweden, located on the east coast at the entrance of lake Mälaren. ... Lviv is a city in western Ukraine, the capital city of the Lviv Oblast (province) and one of the main cultural centres of Ukraine. ...

Contents


War and politics

Mongol Empire

Möngke Khan (1208-1259, also transliterated as Mongke, Mongka, Möngka, Mangu) was the fourth khan of the Mongol Empire. ... Khan (sometimes spelled as xan, han) is a title meaning ruler in Mongolian and Turkish. ... Jump to: navigation, search Mongol Empire in 1300–1405 The Mongol Empire (1206–1368) was the largest contiguous and second largest empire in world history. ... The Kingdom of Galicia and Lodomeria, or simply Galicia, was the largest and northernmost province of Austria from 1772 until 1918, with Lemberg (Lwów, Lviv) as its capital city. ... A puppet state is a state whose government, though notionally of the same culture as the governed people - owes its existence (or other major debt) to being installed, supported or controlled by a more powerful entity, typically a foreign power. ... Jump to: navigation, search Mongol Empire in 1300–1405 The Mongol Empire (1206–1368) was the largest contiguous and second largest empire in world history. ... Jump to: navigation, search Mongol Empire in 1300–1405 The Mongol Empire (1206–1368) was the largest contiguous and second largest empire in world history. ... Jump to: navigation, search A Muslim (Arabic: مسلم) is an adherent of Islam. ... Jump to: navigation, search Image:Baghdad City. ... Jump to: navigation, search Although technically in Giza, The Great Pyramids have become a symbol of Cairo internationally Cairo (Arabic: القاهرة; transliterated: al-Qāhirah) is the capital city of Egypt (and previously the United Arab Republic) and has a metropolitan area population of approximately 15. ... Dali (大理 pinyin: Dàlǐ) was a Bai kingdom centered in what is now Yunnan Province of the Peoples Republic of China. ... Kublai Khan or Khubilai Khan (1215 – 1294), Mongol military leader, was Khan (1260-1294) of the Mongol Empire and founder and first Emperor (1279-1294) of the Chinese Yuan Dynasty. ... Baisha xiyue (Chinese for Baisha fine music) is one of the two surviving forms of traditional music of the Naxi (also spelled Nakhi or Nahi) people of Lijiang, Yunnan Province, China, known as Naxi ancient music. ... Yunnan is a province in southeast China. ... Hulagu Khan (also known as Hülegü, and Hulegu) (1217 – 8 February 1265) was a Mongol ruler who conquered much of Southwest Asia. ... Möngke Khan (1208-1259, also transliterated as Mongke, Mongka, Möngka, Mangu) was the fourth khan of the Mongol Empire. ... Jump to: navigation, search A Muslim (Arabic: مسلم) is an adherent of Islam. ... Jump to: navigation, search World map showing Asia (geographically) Asia is the central and eastern part of Eurasia and worlds largest continent. ... October is the tenth month of the year in the Gregorian Calendar and one of seven Gregorian months with the length of 31 days. ... Honorary guard of Mongolia. ... Mongol commander in Persia (fl. ... Hulagu Khan (also known as Hülegü, and Hulegu) (1217 – 8 February 1265) was a Mongol ruler who conquered much of Southwest Asia. ... The Sultanate of Rûm was a Seljuk sultanate in Anatolia from 1077 to 1307. ... Jump to: navigation, search Asia Minor lies east of the Bosporus, between the Black Sea and the Mediterranean. ... Jump to: navigation, search December 15 is the 349th day of the year (350th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Hulagu Khan (also known as Hülegü, and Hulegu) (1217 – 8 February 1265) was a Mongol ruler who conquered much of Southwest Asia. ... The Hashshashin (also Hashishin), or Assassins were a religious sect (often refered to as a cult) of Ismaili Muslims from the Nizari sub-sect with a militant basis, thought to be active in the 8th to 14th centuries as a mystic secret society specializing in terrorising the Abbasid elite with... The remains of the fabled Alamut castle. ... Khanates of Mongolian Empire: Il-Khanate, Chagatai Khanate, Empire of the Great Khan (Yuan Dynasty), Golden Horde The Ilkhanate (also spelled Il-khanate or Il Khanate) was one of the four divisions within the Mongol Empire. ... Official Government Links The following websites belong to the various branches of government, or are directly operated by the government of the Islamic Republic of Iran: Official site of the Supreme Leader, (Qom office) Iran Newpapers Radio, music, Newspapers, Universities Web Dir Presidency of the Islamic Republic of Iran - Official... Jump to: navigation, search Mongol Empire in 1300–1405 The Mongol Empire (1206–1368) was the largest contiguous and second largest empire in world history. ... Jump to: navigation, search February 10 is the 41st day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... Hulagu Khan (also known as Hülegü, and Hulegu) (1217 – 8 February 1265) was a Mongol ruler who conquered much of Southwest Asia. ... The Mongols are an ethnic group that originated in what is now Mongolia, Russia, and China, particularly Inner Mongolia. ... Jump to: navigation, search Image:Baghdad City. ... Jump to: navigation, search Islam [â–¶] (Arabic: الإسلام al-islām) the submission to God is a monotheistic faith, one of the Abrahamic religions, the worlds second-largest religion, and the fastest growing religion in the world. ... The Goryeo (also Koryo) kingdom ruled Korea from the fall of Silla in 935 until the founding of Joseon in 1392. ... Jump to: navigation, search Korea (Hangul: 한국, Hanguk, used by South Korea; ì¡°ì„ , Joseon, used by North Korea) refers to South Korea (Republic of Korea) and North Korea (Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea) together, which were a unified country until 1945. ... Jump to: navigation, search Mongol Empire in 1300–1405 The Mongol Empire (1206–1368) was the largest contiguous and second largest empire in world history. ...

Europe

Jump to: navigation, search December 13 is the 347th day of the year (348th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Frederick II (left) meets al-Kamil (right). ... An interregnum is a period between kings, between popes of the Roman Catholic Church, or between consuls of the Roman Republic. ... Hohenstaufen was a dynasty of Kings of Germany, many of whom were also crowned Holy Roman Emperor and Dukes of Swabia. ... Jump to: navigation, search Flag of the Habsburg Monarchy; also used as the flag of the Austrian Empire until the Ausgleich of 1867. ... The Lombard League was an alliance formed on December 1, 1167 between 26 (later 30) cities of North Italy, including Cremona, Mantua, Bergamo, Brescia, Milan, Bologna, Padua, Treviso, Vicenza, Verona, Lodi, and Parma. ... Afonso III of Portugal (English Alphonzo), or Affonso (Archaic Portuguese), Alfonso or Alphonso (Portuguese-Galician) or Alphonsus (Latin version), the Bolognian (Port. ... Wikimedia Commons has more media related to: Algarve The Algarve is the name of the southern coast of Portugal, incorporating, amongst others, the towns of Faro, Lagos, and Sagres. ... Jump to: navigation, search The Moors were the medieval Muslim inhabitants of al-Andalus (the Iberian Peninsula including the present day Spain and Portugal) and the Maghreb, whose culture is often called Moorish. Juba II king of Mauretania // Origins of the name The name derives from the old Berber (barbarian... Jump to: navigation, search Only representation of Saint Louis known to be true to life - Early 14th century statue from the church of Mainneville, Eure, France King Louis IX of France or Saint Louis (April 25, 1214/1215–August 25, 1270) was King of France from 1226 until his death. ... Honorary guard of Mongolia. ... Tartary (or Tartaria) is a old term that referred to that region of Asia east of the Ural mountains. ... Henry III (October 1, 1207 – November 16, 1272) is one of the least-known British monarchs, considering the great length of his reign. ... Jump to: navigation, search Royal motto (French): Dieu et mon droit (Translated: God and my right) Englands location within the UK Official language English de facto Capital London de facto Largest city London Area - Total Ranked 1st UK 130,395 km² Population - Total (mid-2004) - Density Ranked 1st UK... Jump to: navigation, search Magna Carta placed certain checks on the absolute power of the English Monarchs. ... Jump to: navigation, search Only representation of Saint Louis known to be true to life - Early 14th century statue from the church of Mainneville, Eure, France King Louis IX of France or Saint Louis (April 25, 1214/1215–August 25, 1270) was King of France from 1226 until his death. ... The Seventh Crusade was a crusade led by Louis IX of France from 1248 to 1254. ... Afonso III of Portugal (English Alphonzo), or Affonso (Archaic Portuguese), Alfonso or Alphonso (Portuguese-Galician) or Alphonsus (Latin version), the Bolognian (Port. ... Leiria is a city in Portugal . ... Jump to: navigation, search Royal motto (French): Dieu et mon droit (Translated: God and my right) Englands location within the UK Official language English de facto Capital London de facto Largest city London Area - Total Ranked 1st UK 130,395 km² Population - Total (mid-2004) - Density Ranked 1st UK... An aerial view of Parliament of India at New Delhi. ... The Peerage is a system of nobility unique to the United Kingdom. ... CURIA REGIS, or AULA REGIS, a term used in England from the time of the Norman Conquest to about the en. ... This article is about the month of May. ... William of Rubruck (also William of Rubruk, Guillaume de Rubrouck, Willielmus de Rubruquis, born ca. ... Jump to: navigation, search Map of Constantinople. ... Tatars (Tatar: Tatarlar/Татарлар) is a collective name applied to the Turkic people of Eastern Europe and Central Asia. ... Henry III (October 1, 1207 – November 16, 1272) is one of the least-known British monarchs, considering the great length of his reign. ... In 1258 a group of barons, led by Simon de Montfort, 6th Earl of Leicester, forced King Henry III of England to accept a new form of government in which power was placed in the hands of a council of 15 members who were to supervise ministerial appointments, local administration... Absolute monarchy is an idealized form of government, a monarchy where the ruler has the power to rule his or her country and citizens freely with no laws or legally-organized direct opposition telling him or her what to do, although some religious authority may be able to discourage the... Jump to: navigation, search Royal motto (French): Dieu et mon droit (Translated: God and my right) Englands location within the UK Official language English de facto Capital London de facto Largest city London Area - Total Ranked 1st UK 130,395 km² Population - Total (mid-2004) - Density Ranked 1st UK... An aerial view of Parliament of India at New Delhi. ... September is the ninth month of the year in the Gregorian Calendar and one of four Gregorian months with 30 days. ... The Empire of Nicaea was the largest of the states founded by refugees from the Byzantine Empire after Constantinople was conquered during the Fourth Crusade. ... The Principality of Achaea was one of the three vassal states of the Latin Empire which replaced the Byzantine Empire after the capture of Constantinople during the Fourth Crusade. ... The Battle of Pelagonia took place in September of 1259, between the Empire of Nicaea and the Principality of Achaea. ... Jump to: navigation, search Map of Constantinople. ... Events July 25 - Constantinople re-captured by Nicaean forces under the command of Michael VIII Palaeologus, Byzantine Empire re-formed August 29 - Urban IV becomes Pope, the last man to do so without being a Cardinal first Bela IV of Hungary repels Tatar invasion Charles of Anjou given rule of... Jump to: navigation, search December 4 is the 338th day (339th on leap years) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Jump to: navigation, search Only representation of Saint Louis known to be true to life - Early 14th century statue from the church of Mainneville, Eure, France King Louis IX of France or Saint Louis (April 25, 1214/1215–August 25, 1270) was King of France from 1226 until his death. ... Henry III (October 1, 1207 – November 16, 1272) is one of the least-known British monarchs, considering the great length of his reign. ... The Treaty of Paris was a treaty between Louis IX of France and Henry III of England. ... World map showing Europe (geographically) When considered a continent, Europe is the worlds second-smallest continent in terms of area, with an area of 10,600,000 km² (4,140,625 square miles), making it larger than Australia only. ... Jump to: navigation, search Mont Saint Michel is a historic pilgrimage site and a symbol of Normandy Normandy is a geographical region in northern France. ... Statistics State: Schleswig-Holstein District: Independent city Area: 214. ... Wismar Coat of Arms Wismar is a smaller port and Hanseatic League city in northern Germany on the Baltic Sea, in the state of Mecklenburg-Vorpommern, about 45 km due east of Lübeck, and 30 km due north of Schwerin. ... Rostock (Slavic origin: roztoka, Polish: Roztoka) is a city in northern Germany. ... Jump to: navigation, search The Baltic Sea is located in Northern Europe, bounded by the Scandinavian Peninsula, the mainlands of Northern Europe, Eastern Europe, Central Europe, and the Danish islands. ... The Hanseatic League (German: die Hanse) was an alliance of trading cities that established and maintained a trade monopoly over most of Northern Europe and the Baltic for a time in the later Middle Ages and the Early Modern period (ie between the 13th and 17th century). ...

Asia and Africa

The Bahri dynasty or Bahriyya Sultante المماليك البحرية was a Mamluk dynasty that ruled Egypt from 1250 to 1382 when they were succeeded by the Burji dynasty, another group of Mamluks. ... Lannathai (often short Lanna, English One Million Thai Rice Fields, Thai ล้านนาไทย) was a kingdom in the north of Thailand around the city of Chiang Mai. ... King Mengrai (or Mangrai) (1239-1317) was the founder of the Thai kingdom Lannathai. ...

Culture

Science and literature

Jump to: navigation, search Albertus Magnus (fresco, 1352, Treviso, Italy) Albertus Magnus (1193? – November 15, 1280), also known as Saint Albert the Great and Albert of Cologne, was a Dominican friar who became famous for his universal knowledge and advocacy for the peaceful coexistence of science and religion. ... Jump to: navigation, search General Name, Symbol, Number arsenic, As, 33 Chemical series metalloids Group, Period, Block 15, 4, p Appearance metallic gray Atomic mass 74. ... Genera Oriolus Sphecotheres Orioles are colourful Old World passerine birds in the family Oriolidae. ... Binomial name Oriolus oriolus (Linnaeus, 1758) The Golden Oriole, Oriolus oriolus , is the only member of the oriole family of passerine birds to breed in northern hemisphere temperate regions. ... This is a list of Japanese classic texts. ... Self portrait of Matthew Paris from a manuscript of his chronicle (London, British Library, MS Royal 14. ... Jump to: navigation, search Royal motto (French): Dieu et mon droit (Translated: God and my right) Englands location within the UK Official language English de facto Capital London de facto Largest city London Area - Total Ranked 1st UK 130,395 km² Population - Total (mid-2004) - Density Ranked 1st UK... English historians in the Middle Ages is an overview of the history of English historians and their works in the Middle Ages. ... Henry III (October 1, 1207 – November 16, 1272) is one of the least-known British monarchs, considering the great length of his reign. ...

Art and architecture

The Rialto Bridge The Rialto Bridge (Italian: Ponte di Rialto) spans the Grand Canal in Venice. ... Venice is known for its waterways and gondolas Gondola. ... Jump to: navigation, search See also Gothic art. ... // Scope and intentions According to the very earliest surviving work on the subject, Vitruvius De Architectura, good buildings should have Beauty (Venustas), Firmness (Firmitas) and Utility (Utilitas); architecture can be said to be a balance and coordination among these three elements, with none overpowering the others. ... Crest of the township (comune) of Assisi Ass isi (Latin: Asisium) is a town and episcopal see in Italy in Perugia province, Italy, in the Umbria region, on the western flank of Mt. ... Jump to: navigation, search City motto: Senatus Populusque Romanus – SPQR (The Senate and the People of Rome) Founded 21 April 753 BC mythical, 1st millennium BC Region Latium Mayor Walter Veltroni (Left-Wing Democrats) Area  - City Proper  1290 km² Population  - City (2004)  - Metropolitan  - Density (city proper) 2,546,807 almost... San Marco in the evening St Marks Basilica (Italian: Basilica di San Marco in Venezia) is the most famous of the churches of Venice and one of the best known examples of Byzantine architecture. ... Jump to: navigation, search Location within Italy Venice (Italian: Venezia), the city of canals, is the capital of the region of Veneto and of the province of Venice, 45°26′ N 12°19′ E, population 271,663 (census estimate 2004-01-01). ... , drawing by Pieter Jansz Saenredam The Cathedral of Saint Martin or Dom Church was the Cathedral of the Province of Utrecht during the Middle Ages. ... Utrecht is a municipality and the capital city of the Dutch province of Utrecht. ... Jump to: navigation, search See also Gothic art. ... A cathedral is a Christian church building, specifically of a denomination with an episcopal hierarchy (such as the Roman Catholic Church or the Lutheran or Anglican churches), which serves as the central church of a bishopric. ... The vaulted nave of Bourges Cathedral Bourges (pop. ... Jump to: navigation, search UNESCO logo The United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, commonly known as UNESCO, is a specialized agency of the United Nations system established in 1945. ... Jump to: navigation, search World Heritage Site #86: Memphis and its Necropolis, including the Pyramids of Giza (Egypt). ... A XIV Century fresco featuring Saint Sebastian Note: Fresco is the NATO reporting name of the Mikoyan-Gurevich MiG-17. ... Frescoes from the Boyana Church: Desislava The church of Boyana is a medieval Bulgarian church situated on the outskirts of Sofia. ... Jump to: navigation, search UNESCO logo The United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, commonly known as UNESCO, is a specialized agency of the United Nations system established in 1945. ... Jump to: navigation, search World Heritage Site #86: Memphis and its Necropolis, including the Pyramids of Giza (Egypt). ...

Cities and institutions

The University of Valladolid is believed to be the oldest university in the Spanish-speaking world, having been founded at the beginning of the 13th century[1]. It currently has 31,780 undergraduate students and over 2,000 faculty[2]. External links Official Website(Spanish language) Official Website in English... Berlin ( ♫), IPA: , is the capital of Germany and its largest city; down from 4. ... Bezants is a medieval name for gold coins. ... Jump to: navigation, search Founded 59 BC as Florentia Region Tuscany Mayor Leonardo Domenici (Democratici di Sinistra) Area  - City Proper  102 km² Population  - City (2004)  - Metropolitan  - Density (city proper) 356,000 almost 500,000 3,453/km² Time zone CET, UTC+1 Latitude Longitude 43°47 N 11°15 E... Florin may be any of these modern coins: Netherlands Antilles florin. ... Jump to: navigation, search The Old town in Stockholm from the air Stockholm [â–¶] is the capital of Sweden, located on the east coast at the entrance of lake Mälaren. ... Birger jarl Birger jarl   listen[?] (Earl Birger), full name Birger Magnusson of Bjälbo (1210 – October 21, 1266), was a Swedish statesman and the founder of Stockholm. ... Copenhagen (Danish: København) is the capital and largest city of Denmark, and the name of the municipality (Danish, kommune) in which it resides. ...   Malmö? IPA: [málmø:] is a town and municipality in the southernmost Swedish province of SkÃ¥ne. ... District Lisbon Mayor   - Party Pedro Santana Lopes PSD Area 84. ... Map of Kaliningrad Oblast Kaliningrad (Russian: Калининград, German: Königsberg, Polish: Królewiec, Lithuanian: Karaliaučius) is a seaport city, capital and main city of the Kaliningrad Oblast, the Russian exclave between Poland and Lithuania with access to the Baltic Sea. ... The coat of arms of the Kingdom of Prussia, 1701-1918 The word Prussia (German: Preußen, Polish: Prusy, Lithuanian: PrÅ«sai, Latin: Borussia) has had various (often contradictory) meanings: The land of the Baltic Prussians (in what is now parts of southern Lithuania, the Kaliningrad exclave of Russia and... Lviv is a city in western Ukraine, the capital city of the Lviv Oblast (province) and one of the main cultural centres of Ukraine. ... Kingdom of Galicia Flag of Przemyśl Danylo King of Rus or Danylo of Galicia (properly Danylo Romanovich or Даниил Романович), (1201-1264) was the 1st King of Galicia, Knyaz of Halych (1205–1206, 1211–1212, 1229–1231, 1233–1235, 1238–1255), Peremyshl (1211, todays Przemyśl), Vladimir and Volhyn (1212... Robert de Sorbon (October 9, 1201 – August 15, 1274) was a French theologian and founder of the Sorbonne college in Paris. ... Jump to: navigation, search The Eiffel Tower has become a symbol of Paris throughout the world. ... The Sorbonne, Paris, in a 17th century engraving The historic University of Paris (French: Université de Paris) first appeared in the second half of the 12th century, but was in 1970 reorganized as 13 autonomous universities (University of Paris I–XIII). ...

Religion

The Tripitaka Koreana (lit. ... Jump to: navigation, search A replica of an ancient statue found among the ruins of a temple at Sarnath Buddhism is a religion and philosophy based on the teachings of the Buddha, Siddhārtha Gautama, a prince of the Shakyas, whose lifetime is traditionally given as 566 to 486 BCE... Many religions and spiritual movements hold certain written texts (or series of spoken legends not traditionally written down) to be sacred. ... Jump to: navigation, search May 15 is the 135th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (136th in leap years). ... Innocent IV, né Sinibaldo de Fieschi (Genoa, ca. ... Papal bull of Pope Urban VIII, 1637, sealed with a leaden bulla. ... Ad extirpanda is a papal bull issued on May 15, 1252, by Pope Innocent IV. It authorized the use of torture for eliciting confessions from heretics during the Inquisition and explicitly condoned the practice of executing relapsed heretics by burning them alive. ... Jump to: navigation, search The Iron Maiden of Nuremberg was a famous torture device, though misconceptions about it do exist. ... Heresy, according to the Oxford English Dictionary, is a theological or religious opinion or doctrine maintained in opposition, or held to be contrary, to the ‘catholic’ or orthodox doctrine of the Christian Church, or, by extension, to that of any church, creed, or religious system, considered as orthodox. ... Pedro Berruguete. ... World map showing Europe (geographically) When considered a continent, Europe is the worlds second-smallest continent in terms of area, with an area of 10,600,000 km² (4,140,625 square miles), making it larger than Australia only. ... Jump to: navigation, search April 28 is the 118th day of the year (119th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 247 days remaining. ... Nichiren (日蓮) (February 16, 1222 - October 13, 1282), born Zennichimaro (善日麿), later Zeshō-bō Renchō (是生房蓮長), and finally Nichiren (日蓮), was a Buddhist monk of 13th century Japan. ... Jump to: navigation, search A replica of an ancient statue found among the ruins of a temple at Sarnath Buddhism is a religion and philosophy based on the teachings of the Buddha, Siddhārtha Gautama, a prince of the Shakyas, whose lifetime is traditionally given as 566 to 486 BCE... The Lotus Sutra or Sutra on the White Lotus of the Sublime Dharma (Sanskrit: Saddharmapundarīka-sūtra; 妙法蓮華經 Cn: Miàofǎ Liánhuā Jīng; Jp: Myōhō Renge Kyō) is one of the most popular and influential Mahāyāna sutras in East Asia and the basis on which the Tiantai and Nichiren sects of Buddhism... Nam Myōhō Renge Kyō (南無妙法蓮華経, also transliterated Namu Myōhō Renge Kyō) is a mantra, which is recited as part of the practice of Nichiren Buddhism. ... Nichiren Buddhism (日蓮系諸宗派 Nichiren-kei sho shÅ«ha) is a branch of Buddhism based on the orignal Shakyamuni Buddhas final teaching, The Lotus Sutra, and stemming from its interpretation by the 13th century Japanese monk Nichiren (1222–1282). ... Dogma (the plural is either dogmata or dogmas) is belief or doctrine held by a religion or any kind of organization to be authoritative. ... Jump to: navigation, search eqweeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeh|Roman Catholic]] theology, Purgatory is a process of purification after the particular judgment and before entry into Heaven. ... Jump to: navigation, search April 13 is the 103rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (104th in leap years). ... Alexander IV, né Rinaldo Conti (Anagni, ca. ... Papal bull of Pope Urban VIII, 1637, sealed with a leaden bulla. ... The Augustinians, named after Saint Augustine of Hippo (died AD 430), are several Roman Catholic monastic orders and congregations of both men and women living according to a guide to religious life known as the Rule of Saint Augustine. ... Monasticism (from Greek: monachos—a solitary person) is the religious practice of renouncing all worldly pursuits in order to fully devote ones life to spiritual work. ... A religious order is an organization of people who live in some way set apart from society in accordance with religious devotion. ...

Births

Jump to: navigation, search September 15 is the 258th day of the year (259th in leap years). ... Jump to: navigation, search Marco Polo, after a late painting Marco Polo (15 September 1254, Venice, Italy; or Curzola, Venetian Dalmatia - now Korčula, Croatia — 8 January 1324, Venice) was a Venetian trader and explorer who, together with his father Niccolò and his uncle Maffeo, was one of the first... Venetian could mean of Venice of the venetia territory of the Republic of Venice of the venet nation the Venetian language The Venetian, a hotel and casino in Las Vegas, Nevada A venetian blind - a horizontally slatted window blind. ... Contents: Top - 0–9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z A Antonio de Abreu (16th century Portuguese explorer of Indonesia) Charles Albanel (1616-1696), Canada Afonso de Albuquerque (16th century... July is the seventh month of the year in the Gregorian Calendar and one of seven Gregorian months with the length of 31 days. ... Albert I (July 1255 – May 1, 1308) was a German king, duke of Austria, and eldest son of King Rudolph I of Habsburg. ... The Holy Roman Emperor was, with some variation, the ruler of the Holy Roman Empire, the predecessor of modern Germany, during its existence from the 10th century until its collapse in 1806. ... Events Henry VII is elected as king of the Holy Roman Empire. ... Sultan Osman I Osman I (1258–1326) (Ottoman عُثمَان ʿUthmān) was the founder of the Ottoman Empire. ... Jump to: navigation, search Imperial motto (Ottoman Turkish) Devlet-i Ebed-müddet (the Eternal State) The Ottoman Empire at the height of its power Official language Ottoman Turkish Capital Bursa (1335 - 1365), Edirne (1365-1453), Ä°stanbul (Constantinople) (1453-1922) Imperial anthem Ottoman imperial anthem Sovereigns Padishah of the Osmanli...

Deaths


  Results from FactBites:
 
1250s - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1501 words)
The 1250s is the decade starting January 1, 1250 and ending December 31, 1259.
The decade was perhaps most dominated by the Mongols, who under the leadership of Möngke Khan continued their rapid expansion throughout Asia both to the east and west of their home territories.
In religion, a papal bull authorized the use of torture in the Medieval Inquisition, and the Catholic church clarified the concept of purgatory.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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