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Encyclopedia > 10000 (number)
10001
10000

List of numbersIntegers Nine thousand nine-hundred ninety-nine (9999) is the natural number following 9998 and preceding 10000. ... This is a list of articles about numbers (not about numerals). ... The integers are commonly denoted by the above symbol. ...

10000 100000 Cardinal 1000 one thousand Ordinal 1000th Numeral system Factorization Prime Divisor(s) Roman numeral Unicode symbol(s) , , Greek Prefix chilia Latin Prefix milli Binary 1111101000 Octal 1750 Duodecimal 6B4 Hexadecimal 3E8 1000 (one thousand) is the natural number following 999 and preceding 1001. ... One hundred thousand (100000) is the natural number following 99999 and preceding 100001. ... One million (1,000,000), or one thousand thousand, is the natural number following 999,999 and preceding 1,000,001. ...

Cardinal 10000
Ordinal 10000th
(ten thousandth)
Numeral system decamillesimal
Factorization 24x54
Roman numeral X
Unicode symbol(s) X, ↂ
Greek Prefix myria- (obsolete)
Latin Prefix decamilli-
Binary 10011100010000
Octal 23420
Duodecimal 5954
Hexadecimal 2710
Look up ten thousand in
Wiktionary, the free dictionary.

10000 (ten thousand) is the natural number following 9999 and preceding 10001. Aleph-0, the smallest infinite cardinal In mathematics, cardinal numbers, or cardinals for short, are a generalized kind of number used to denote the size of a set. ... Commonly, ordinal numbers, or ordinals for short, are numbers used to denote the position in an ordered sequence: first, second, third, fourth, etc. ... A numeral is a symbol or group of symbols, or a word in a natural language that represents a number. ... In mathematics, factorization or factoring is the decomposition of an object (for example, a number, a polynomial, or a matrix) into a product of other objects, or factors, which when multiplied together give the original. ... The system of Roman numerals is a numeral system originating in ancient Rome, and was adapted from Etruscan numerals. ... Unicode is an industry standard designed to allow text and symbols from all of the writing systems of the world to be consistently represented and manipulated by computers. ... A numerical prefix is a prefix that denotes a number, which is usually a multiplier for the thing being prefixed. ... There exist several unit prefixes used like the SI prefixes, but that are not part of the SI system. ... Latin is an ancient Indo-European language originally spoken in Latium, the region immediately surrounding Rome. ... A numerical prefix is a prefix that denotes a number, which is usually a multiplier for the thing being prefixed. ... The binary numeral system, or base-2 number system, is a numeral system that represents numeric values using two symbols, usually 0 and 1. ... The octal numeral system, or oct for short, is the base-8 number system, and uses the digits 0 to 7. ... The duodecimal (also known as base-12 or dozenal) system is a numeral system using twelve as its base. ... In mathematics and computer science, hexadecimal, base-16, or simply hex, is a numeral system with a radix, or base, of 16, usually written using the symbols 0–9 and A–F, or a–f. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... It has been suggested that French Wiktionary be merged into this article or section. ... In mathematics, a natural number can mean either an element of the set {1, 2, 3, ...} (i. ... The year 10,000 problem is the collective name for all potential software bugs that may emerge as the need to express years with five digits arises. ...

Contents

Name

Most languages call 10000 'ten thousands', but some languages have specific words for it: Ancient Greek μύριοι, Aramaic ܪܒܘܬܐ, Hebrew revava, Chinese 萬/万 (Mandarin wan, Cantonese maan6), Japanese 万/萬 [man], and Korean 万/만/萬 [man]. It is often used to mean an indefinite very large number. Note: This article contains special characters. ... Aramaic is a group of Semitic languages with a 3,000-year history. ... “Hebrew” redirects here. ...


The Greek root was used in the earlier versions of the metric system in the form myria-. The International System of Units (symbol: SI) (for the French phrase Syst me International dUnit s) is the most widely used system of units. ... There exist several unit prefixes used like the SI prefixes, but that are not part of the SI system. ...


The number can be written 10,000 (USA), 10 000 (transition metric), or 10•000 (with the dot raised to the middle of the zeroes; metric).

See also: Orders of magnitude (numbers)

This list compares various sizes of positive numbers, including counts of things, dimensionless numbers and probabilities. ...

In mathematics

Scientific notation is a scheme for writing numbers that is often used by scientists and mathematicians to easily write large and small numbers. ... y=x², for all integer values of 1≤x≤25. ... 100 (one hundred) (the Roman numeral is C for centum) is the natural number following 99 and preceding 101. ... In mathematics, a square root of a number x is a number whose square (the result of multiplying the number by itself) is x. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Look up polygon in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... To help compare different orders of magnitude this page lists lengths between 10 and 100 km (104 to 105 m). ... A mile is a unit of length, usually used to measure distance, in a number of different systems, including Imperial units, United States customary units and Norwegian/Swedish mil. ... For other uses, see Square. ... To help compare different orders of magnitude and geographical regions, we list here areas between 100 km² and 1000 km². See also areas of other orders of magnitude. ... Square kilometre (US spelling: Square kilometer), symbol km², is an SI unit of surface area. ... Circle illustration This article is about the shape and mathematical concept of circle. ... The Greek alphabet is an alphabet that has been used to write the Greek language since about the 9th century BCE. It was the first alphabet in the narrow sense, that is, a writing system using a separate symbol for each vowel and consonant alike. ... Greek numerals are a system of representing numbers using letters of the Greek alphabet. ... Look up Îœ, μ in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Myriad is a classical Greek name for the number 104 = 10 000, or a group of 10 000 people, etc. ... Myriad is a classical Greek name for the number 104 = 10 000, or a group of 10 000 people, etc. ... Exponentiation is a mathematical operation, written an, involving two numbers, the base a and the exponent n. ... Apollonius of Perga [Pergaeus] (c. ...

In science

Anatomical drawing of the human muscles from the Encyclopédie. ... Drawing by Santiago Ramón y Cajal of neurons in the pigeon cerebellum. ... In animals the brain, or encephalon (Greek for in the head), is the control center of the central nervous system. ... A giant Hubble mosaic of the Crab Nebula, a supernova remnant Astronomy is the science of celestial objects (such as stars, planets, comets, and galaxies) and phenomena that originate outside the Earths atmosphere (such as auroras and cosmic background radiation). ... 253 Mathilde, a C-type asteroid. ... September 30 is the 273rd day of the year (274th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1951 (MCMLI) was a common year starting on Monday; see its calendar. ... Albert George Wilson (July 28, 1918 – ?) was an American astronomer. ... Contents: 9001. ... The U.S. National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) in Asheville, North Carolina is the worlds largest active archive of weather data. ... The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) is an agency of the United States Department of Commerce. ... A BlueGene supercomputer cabinet. ... The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is an agency of the United States Government, responsible for that nations public space program. ... Linux (IPA pronunciation: ) is a Unix-like computer operating system family. ... // A nickname is a short, clever, cute, derogatory, or otherwise substitute name for a person or things real name (for example, Bob, Rob, Robby, Robbie, Robi, Robin, Bobby, Rab, Rabbie, Bert, Bertie, Butch, Bobbers, Bobert, Beto, Bobadito, and Robban (in Sweden), are all nicknames for Robert). ... Capital Saint Paul Largest city Minneapolis Area  Ranked 12th  - Total 87,014 sq mi (225,365 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 400 miles (645 km)  - % water 8. ... Official language(s) English Capital Nashville Largest city Memphis Largest metro area Nashville Area  Ranked 36th  - Total 42,169 sq mi (109,247 km²)  - Width 120 miles (195 km)  - Length 440 miles (710 km)  - % water 2. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Frankfort Largest city Louisville Area  Ranked 37th  - Total 40,444 sq mi (104,749 km²)  - Width 140 miles (225 km)  - Length 379 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ... Big Cypress National Preserve is a United States National Preserve located in southern Florida, about 45 miles (72 kilometers) west of Miami. ... Everglades National Park preserves the southern portion of the Everglades (all south of Tamiami Trail), but represents only 20 % of the original wetland area. ... Official language(s) English Capital Tallahassee Largest city Jacksonville Largest metro area Miami Area  Ranked 22nd  - Total 65,795[1] sq mi (170,304[1] km²)  - Width 361 miles (582 km)  - Length 447 miles (721 km)  - % water 17. ... The Valley of Ten Thousand Smokes is a valley within Katmai National Park and Preserve in Alaska which is filled with ash flow from the eruption of Novarupta on June 6-June 8, 1912. ... Mr. ... Nickname: Big Apple, Gotham, NYC, City That Never Sleeps, The Concrete Jungle, The City So Nice They Named It Twice Location in the state of New York Coordinates: Country United States State New York Boroughs The Bronx Brooklyn Manhattan Queens Staten Island Settled 1676 Government  - Mayor Michael Bloomberg (R) Area... This article includes a list of works cited but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... For other uses, see Volcano (disambiguation). ... Physics (Greek: (phúsis), nature and (phusiké), knowledge of nature) is the science concerned with the fundamental laws of the universe. ... Myria is an obsolete prefix in the SI system of units that denoted a factor of 10+4 (ten thousand, 10,000). ... An SI prefix is a prefix that can be applied to an SI unit to form a decimal multiple (supramultiple or submultiple). ... Myrio is an obsolete prefix in the SI system of units that denoted a factor of 10−4 (one ten-thousandth). ... An SI prefix is a prefix that can be applied to an SI unit to form a decimal multiple (supramultiple or submultiple). ... For the techno single by Moby, see Thousand (single). ... The hertz (symbol: Hz) is the SI unit of frequency. ... A kilohertz (kHz) is a unit of frequency equal to 1,000 hertz (1,000 cycles per second). ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Radio waves. ... Very low frequency or VLF refers to radio frequencies (RF) in the range of 3 to 30 kHz. ... The wavelength is the distance between repeating units of a wave pattern. ... km redirects here. ... To help compare different orders of magnitude, the following list describes various speed levels between 1. ... Speed is the rate of motion, or equivalently the rate of change of position, many times expressed as distance d moved per unit of time t. ... A fast neutron is a free neutron with a kinetic energy level close to 1 MeV (10 TJ/kg, hence a speed of 14,000 km/s. ... The pages linked in the right-hand column contain lists of volumes that are of the same order of magnitude (power of ten). ... The volume of a solid object is the three-dimensional concept of how much space it occupies, often quantified numerically. ... To help compare different orders of magnitudes this page lists volumes between 1,000 and 1 million cubic kilometres ( to cubic metres). ... Lake Superior, bounded by Ontario and Minnesota to the north and Wisconsin and Michigan to the south, is the largest of North Americas Great Lakes. ... A square metre (US spelling: square meter) is by definition the area enclosed by a square with sides each 1 metre long. ... A hectare (symbol ha) is a unit of area, equal to 10 000 square metres, commonly used for measuring land area. ... Zoology (rarely spelled zoölogy) is the biological discipline which involves the study of non-human animals. ... “Aves” redirects here. ...

In time

See 1 E11 s for more remote dates. ... The first prototype, on display at the Science Museum in London. ...

In other fields

The Bath, a painting by Mary Cassatt (1844-1926). ... Xenophon, Greek historian Xenophon (In Greek , c. ... For building painting, see painter and decorator. ... Benjamin Robert Haydon (January 26, 1786 _ June 22, 1846) was an English historical painter and writer. ... Software, consisting of programs, enables a computer to perform specific tasks, as opposed to the physical components of the system (hardware). ... This article or section is not written in the formal tone expected of an encyclopedia article. ... ISO 4217 Code IQD User(s) Iraq Inflation rate 33% Source The World Factbook, 2005 est. ... A £20 Bank of England banknote. ... Alhazen Abu Ali al-Hasan Ibn Al-Haitham (also: Ibn al Haitham) (965-1040) (Arabic: أبو علي الحسن بن الهيثم) was an Arab Muslim mathematician; he is sometimes called al-Basri (Arabic: البصري), after his birthplace Basra, Arab Islamic Caliphate (now Iraq). ... Saddam Hussein Abd al-Majid al-Tikriti (Arabic: [1]; April 28, 1937[2] – December 30, 2006[3]), was the President of Iraq from July 16, 1979, until April 9, 2003. ... Map showing Samarra near Baghdad Sāmarrā (سامراء) is a town in Iraq ( ). It stands on the east bank of the Tigris in the Salah ad Din Governorate, 125 km north of Baghdad and, in 2002, had an estimated population of 201,700. ... Japanese 10 yen coin (obverse) showing Phoenix Hall of Byodoin Yen is the currency used in Japan. ... Fukuzawa Yukichi (福澤 諭吉 Yukichi Fukuzawa, January 10, 1835 - February 3, 1901) was a Japanese author, writer, teacher, entrepreneur and political theorist and founder of the Keio University whose ideas about government and social institutions made a lasting impression on a rapidly changing Japan during the period known as the Meiji Era. ... Motto: (Out Of Many, One) (traditional) In God We Trust (1956 to date) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington D.C. Largest city New York City None at federal level (English de facto) Government Federal constitutional republic  - President George Walker Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence from... Today, the currency of the United States, the U.S. dollar, is printed in bills in denominations of $1, $2, $5, $10, $20, $50, and $100. ... For other uses, see Andrew Jackson (disambiguation). ... Salmon Portland Chase (January 13, 1808 – May 7, 1873) was an American politician and jurist in the Civil War era who served as Senator from Ohio, Governor of Ohio, as U.S. Treasury Secretary under President Abraham Lincoln, and Chief Justice of the United States. ... Film is a term that encompasses individual motion pictures, the field of film as an art form, and the motion picture industry. ... Film is a term that encompasses individual motion pictures, the field of film as an art form, and the motion picture industry. ... The Internet Movie Database (IMDb) [1] is an online database of information about actors, movies, television shows, television stars and video games. ... The Internet Movie Database (IMDb) [1] is an online database of information about actors, movies, television shows, television stars and video games. ... The Internet Movie Database (IMDb) [1] is an online database of information about actors, movies, television shows, television stars and video games. ... Finance studies and addresses the ways in which individuals, businesses, and organizations raise, allocate, and use monetary resources over time, taking into account the risks entailed in their projects. ... March 29 is the 88th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (89th in leap years). ... 1999 (MCMXCIX) was a common year starting on Friday, and was designated the International Year of Older Persons by the United Nations. ... The Dow Jones Industrial Average (NYSE: DJI, also called the DJIA, Dow 30, or informally the Dow industrials or The Dow) is one of several stock market indices created by Wall Street Journal editor and Dow Jones & Company co-founder Charles Dow. ... Futurology or futures studies (called futurism in the United States) is the study of the medium to long-term future, by extrapolating present technological, economic or social trends, or by attempting to predict future trends. ... Stewart Brand speaking September 5, 2004 Stewart Brand (born December 14, 1938 in Rockford, Illinois) is an author, editor, and creator of The Whole Earth Catalog and CoEvolution Quarterly. ... Tug of war is an easily organized, impromptu game that requires little equipment. ... Mahjong (Traditional Chinese: ; Simplified Chinese: ; pinyin: ; Cantonese: Màhjeung; or Chinese: ; pinyin: ; Cantonese: Màhjeuk; other common English spellings include mahjongg, majiang, and hyphenated forms such as mah-jong or mah-jongg) is a game for four players that originated in China. ... Mahjong tiles are tiles of Chinese origin that are used to play many games, most notably Mahjong and Mahjong Solitaire. ... This is an in-depth discussion of the rules of Go. ... A board game is a game played with counters or pieces that are placed on, removed from, or moved across a board (a premarked surface, usually specific to that game). ... Go is a strategic board game for two players. ... This article is about the television genre. ... Pyramid was an American television game show where contestants tried to guess a series of words or phrases, based on descriptions that were given to them, in the shortest amount of time. ... 1973 (MCMLXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday. ... 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Applied art. ... History studies the past in human terms. ... This article is becoming very long. ... The Ten Thousand were a group of mercenary units, mainly Greek, drawn up by Cyrus the Younger to attempt to wrest the throne of the Persian Empire from his brother, Artaxerxes II. Their march to the Battle of Cunaxa and back to Greece (401 BC-399 BC) was recorded by... Note: This article contains special characters. ... Mercenary (disambiguation). ... The Persian Empire was a series of historical empires that ruled over the Iranian plateau, the old Persian homeland, and beyond in Western Asia, Central Asia and the Caucasus. ... Shah is a Persian term for a monarch (king or emperor) that has been adopted in many other languages. ... Artaxerxes II (c. ... Statue of Ceres, the Roman goddess of agriculture A goddess is a female deity, in contrast with a male deity known as a god. Many cultures have goddesses. ... This article discusses the ancient goddess. ... This article is about the 1940 massacre of Polish officers. ... The Institute for Historical Review (IHR), founded in 1978, describes itself as a non-ideological, non-political, and non-sectarian organization dedicated to historical revisionism. ... Geneva Convention definition A prisoner of war (POW) is a soldier, sailor, airman, or marine who is imprisoned by an enemy power during or immediately after an armed conflict. ... Soviet redirects here. ... 10,000 martyrs of Mount Ararat by Vittore Carpaccio The ten thousand martyrs of Mount Ararat were, according to legend, Roman soldiers who converted to Christianity and were crucified on Mount Ararat by order of the Roman emperor. ... Two Achaemenid Immortal Guards The Archaemenid Immortals (or Persian Immortals, or simply Immortals) were the Persian elite Imperial Guard regiment during the Greco-Persian Wars. ... For the band, see Tang Dynasty (band). ... Nanzhao (Traditional Chinese: 南詔, Simplified Chinese: 南诏, pinyin: Nánzhāo, Alternate spellings: Nanchao, Nan Chao) was a Bai kingdom that flourished in East Asia during the 8th and 9th centuries. ... Banzai redirects here. ... East Asia is a subregion of Asia that can be defined in either geographical or cultural terms. ... The Interlingua-English Dictionary (IED), developed by the International Auxiliary Language Association (IALA) and published by Storm Publishers in 1951, is the first Interlingua dictionary. ... Myriad is a classical Greek name for the number 104 = 10 000, or a group of 10 000 people, etc. ... Note: This article contains special characters. ... “Hebrew” redirects here. ... Lady Justice or Justitia is a personification of the moral force that underlies the legal system (particularly in Western art). ... It has been suggested that Executive Office for United States Attorneys be merged into this article or section. ... Capital punishment, also referred to as the death penalty, is the judicially ordered execution of a prisoner as a crime, often called a capital offense or a capital crime. ... Old book bindings at the Merton College library. ... ManyōshÅ« , Collection of Ten Thousand Leaves) is the oldest existing, and most highly revered, collection of Japanese poetry, compiled sometime in the Nara or early Heian periods. ... Grave of the Japanese poet Yosa Buson The best-known forms of Japanese poetry (outside Japan) are haiku and senryu. ... Samuel Warren (23 May 1807–29 July 1877), novelist, born in Denbighshire, son of a Nonconformist minister. ... This does not cite its references or sources. ... In theater, an act (noun) is a short performance that is part of a longer program. ... Charles Wright (born August 25, 1935) is an American poet. ... Edeet Ravel is an Israeli-Canadian novelist. ... The Louvre Museum in Paris, one of the largest and most famous museums in the world. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... For other uses, see Music (disambiguation). ... 10,000 Days is the Grammy Award-winning fourth full-length studio album by Tool. ... Tool is an American progressive rock band, formed in 1990 in Los Angeles, California, when drummer Danny Carey joined the rehearsal of his neighbor, singer Maynard James Keenan, guitarist Adam Jones and bassist Paul dAmour, when nobody else would show up. ... Ten Thousand Fists is the third full album by a hard rock band, Disturbed, released in stores on September 20, 2005 - three years and three days after the release of their previous album Believe. ... Disturbed is an American alternative metal band from Chicago, Illinois. ... 10,000 Hz Legend is the third album by French electronic duo Air, first released in May 2001. ... Air is a French music duo, consisting of Nicolas Godin and Jean-Benoît Dunckel. ... 10,000 Maniacs is a United States-based alternative rock band, formed in 1981 and active with various line-ups since that time. ... Rock and roll (also spelled Rock n Roll, especially in its first decade), also called rock, is a form of popular music, usually featuring vocals (often with vocal harmony), electric guitars and a strong back beat; other instruments, such as the saxophone, are common in some styles. ... [[ For other uses, see Song (disambiguation). ... Bob Dylan (born Robert Allen Zimmerman, May 24, 1941) is an American singer-songwriter, author, musician, and poet who has been a major figure in popular music for five decades. ... A fight song is primarily a sports term, referring to a song associated with a team. ... Harvard University (incorporated as The President and Fellows of Harvard College) , is a private university in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA. One of the eight Ivies, it was founded in 1636. ... The Backstreet Boys are a Grammy-nominated male vocal pop group that enjoyed enormous success in the mid-late 1990s and 2000s. ... 10,000 Promises. ... J-pop (or Jpop) is an abbreviation of Japanese pop. ... Car camping is camping in a tent, but nearby the car for easier access and for supply storage. ... A festival is an event, usually staged by a local community, which centers on some unique aspect of that community. ... Capital Saint Paul Largest city Minneapolis Area  Ranked 12th  - Total 87,014 sq mi (225,365 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 400 miles (645 km)  - % water 8. ... This article is 58 kilobytes or more in size. ... Lao Zi (Chinese 老子, also spelled Laozi, Lao Tzu, or Lao Tse) is a major figure in Chinese philosophy whose historical existence is debated. ... The Tao Te Ching (道德經, Pinyin: D Jīng, thus sometimes rendered in recent works as Dao De Jing; archaic pre-Wade-Giles rendering: Tao Teh Ching; roughly translated as The Book of the Way and its Virtue (see dedicated chapter below on translating the title)) is... Zen is a school of Mahayana Buddhism that places great importance on moment-by-moment awareness and seeing deeply into the nature of things by direct experience. ... Buddhism is a dharmic, non-theistic religion and a philosophy. ... Reality in everyday usage means the state of things as they actually exist. ... Physical fitness is an attribute required for service in virtually all military forces. ... An animated demonstration of a six-legged insect walking. ... The term Exercise can refer to: Physical exercise such as running or strength training Exercise (options), the financial term for enacting and terminating a contract Category: ... Psychology is an academic or applied discipline involving the scientific study of mental processes such as perception, cognition, emotion, personality, behavior, and interpersonal relationships. ... A dream is the experience of envisioned images, sounds, or other sensations during sleep. ... Project Gutenberg logo Project Gutenberg (often abbreviated as PG) is a volunteer effort to digitize, archive, and distribute cultural works via book scanning. ... Regional planning is a branch of land use planning and deals with the efficient placement of land use activities, infrastructure and settlement growth across a significantly larger area of land than an individual city or town. ... It has been suggested that Organizing be merged into this article or section. ... As commonly used, individual refers to a person or to any specific object in a collection. ... Land use is the pattern of construction and activity land is used for. ... Official language(s) English, Pennsylvania Dutch Capital Harrisburg Largest city Philadelphia Area  Ranked 33rd  - Total 46,055 sq mi (119,283 km²)  - Width 280 miles (455 km)  - Length 160 miles (255 km)  - % water 2. ... The city of San Francisco, an example of an urban area. ... Housing subdivision near Union, Kentucky, a suburb of Cincinnati, Ohio. ... Rural area in Dalarna, Sweden Qichun, a rural town in Hubei province, China Rural areas (also referred to as the country, countryside) are sparsely settled places away from the influence of large cities. ... A community usually refers to a sociological group in a large place or collections of plant or animal organisms sharing an environment. ... Urban sprawl (also: suburban sprawl), a term with pejorative implication, refers to the unplanned, rapid and expansive growth of a greater metropolitan area, traditionally suburbs (or exurbs) over a large area. ... This Gutenberg Bible is displayed by the United States Library of Congress. ... This page is about the version of the Bible; for the Harvey Danger album, see King James Version (album). ... The brief Epistle of Jude is a book in the Christian New Testament canon. ... Visions of John of Patmos, as depicted in the Très Riches Heures du Duc de Berry. ... Buddhism is a dharmic, non-theistic religion and a philosophy. ... A hymn is a type of song, usually religious, specifically written for the purpose of praise, adoration or prayer, and typically addressed to a god or other religiously significant figure. ... A womens 400m hurdles race on a typical outdoor red rubber track. ... The metre, or meter (U.S.), is a measure of length. ... km redirects here. ... Long-distance track event races require runners to balance their energy. ... A race is a competition of speed. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Police officer on a bicycle Cycling is a recreation, a sport and a means of transport across land. ... Alpine skier carving a turn on piste Members of the U.S. Air Force skiing (and snowboarding) at Keystone Resorts 14th Annual SnoFest Downhill Ski Racing This article is about snow skiing. ... Bicycle racing encompasses many forms in which bicycles are used for competition. ... Nickname: City of Lakes Motto: En Avant (French: Lets go!) Location in Hennepin County and the state of Minnesota. ...

Selected 5-digit numbers (10001 - 99999)

  • 10033 - a character from the fictional Vlog series Lonelygirl15
  • 10201 - palindromic square
  • 10206 - pentagonal pyramidal number
  • 10223 - one of nine remaining Seventeen or Bust numbers in the Sierpinski problem
  • 10239 - Woodall number
  • 10267 - cuban prime
  • 10301 - palindromic prime
  • 10333 - star prime
  • 10416 - square pyramidal number
  • 10425 - octahedral number
  • 10501 - palindromic prime
  • 10570 - weird number
  • 10585 - Carmichael number
  • 10601 - palindromic prime
  • 10609 - tribonacci number
  • 10646 - ISO 10646 is the standard for Unicode
  • 10660 - tetrahedral number
  • 10671 - tetranacci number
  • 10744 - amicable number with 10856
  • 10752 - the second 16-bit word of a TIFF file if the byte order marker is misunderstood
  • 10792 - weird number
  • 10800 - number of bricks used for the uttaravedi in the Agnicayana ritual
  • 10837 - star prime
  • 10856 - amicable number with 10744
  • 10905 - Wedderburn-Etherington number
  • 10946 - Fibonacci number, Markov number
  • 10990 - weird number
  • 11025 - sum of the cubes of the first 14 positive integers
  • 11311 - palindromic prime
  • 11368 - pentagonal pyramidal number
  • 11410 - weird number
  • 11411 - palindromic prime
  • 11440 - square pyramidal number
  • 11480 - tetrahedral number
  • 11605 - smallest integer to start a run of five consecutive integers with the same number of divisors
  • 11690 - weird number
  • 11719 - cuban prime
  • 11726 - octahedral number
  • 12097 - cuban prime
  • 12110 - weird number
  • 12198 - semi-meandric number
  • 12285 - amicable number with 14595
  • 12287 - Thabit number
  • 12321 - palindromic square
  • 12341 - tetrahedral number
  • 12421 - palindromic prime
  • 12529 - square pyramidal number
  • 12530 - weird number
  • 12670 - weird number
  • 12721 - palindromic prime
  • 12726 - Ruth-Aaron number
  • 12821 - palindromic prime
  • 13244 - tetrahedral number
  • 13267 - cuban prime
  • 13131 - octahedral number
  • 13331 - palindromic prime
  • 13370 - weird number
  • 13510 - weird number
  • 13669 - cuban prime
  • 13685 - square pyramidal number
  • 13790 - weird number
  • 13820 - meandric number, open meandric number
  • 13831 - palindromic prime
  • 13860 - Pell number
  • 13930 - weird number
  • 13931 - palindromic prime
  • 13950 - pentagonal pyramidal number
  • 14190 - tetrahedral number
  • 14200 - number of n-Queens Problem solutions for n = 12,
  • 14341 - palindromic prime
  • 14400 - sum of the cubes of the first 15 positive integers
  • 14641 - palindromic square
  • 14644 - octahedral number
  • 14701 - Markov number
  • 14741 - palindromic prime
  • 14770 - weird number
  • 14595 - amicable number with 12285
  • 14910 - square pyramidal number
  • 14976 - chiliagonal number
  • 15180 - tetrahedral number
  • 15376 - pentagonal pyramidal number
  • 15387 - Zeisel number
  • 15451 - palindromic prime
  • 15511 - Motzkin number
  • 15551 - palindromic prime
  • 15610 - weird number
  • 15625 = 56
  • 15841 - Carmichael number
  • 15890 - weird number
  • 16030 - weird number
  • 16061 - palindromic prime
  • 16091 - strobogrammatic prime
  • 16127 - Carol number
  • 16206 - square pyramidal number
  • 16269 - octahedral number
  • 16310 - weird number
  • 16361 - palindromic prime
  • 16384 - 214 (power of two)
  • 16843 - Wolstenholme prime
  • 16561 - palindromic prime
  • 16580 - Leyland number
  • 16639 - Kynea number
  • 16651 - cuban prime
  • 16661 - palindromic prime
  • 16730 - weird number
  • 16796 - Catalan number
  • 16807 = 75
  • 16870 - weird number
  • 16896 - pentagonal pyramidal number
  • 17272 - weird number
  • 17296 - amicable number with 18416
  • 17344 - Kaprekar number
  • 17471 - palindromic prime
  • 17570 - weird number
  • 17575 - square pyramidal number
  • 17711 - Fibonacci number
  • 17971 - palindromic prime
  • 17990 - weird number
  • 18010 - octahedral number
  • 18181 - palindromic prime, strobogrammatic prime
  • 18410 - weird number
  • 18416 - amicable number with 17296
  • 18481 - palindromic prime
  • 18496 - sum of the cubes of the first 16 positive integers
  • 18600 - harmonic divisor number
  • 18620 - harmonic divisor number
  • 18785 - Leyland number
  • 18830 - weird number
  • 18970 - weird number
  • 19019 - square pyramidal number
  • 19249 - one of nine remaining Seventeen or Bust numbers in the Sierpinski problem
  • 19390 - weird number
  • 19391 - palindromic prime
  • 19441 - cuban prime
  • 19455 - smallest integer that can't be expressed as a sum of fewer than 548 ninth powers
  • 19513 - tribonacci number
  • 19600 - 1402, tetrahedral number
  • 19609 - first prime followed by a prime gap of over fifty
  • 19670 - weird number
  • 19683 = 39
  • 19871 - octahedral number
  • 19891 - palindromic prime
  • 19927 - cuban prime
  • 19991 - palindromic prime
  • 20000 - round number; also in the title of Jules Verne's novel 20,000 Leagues Under The Sea
  • 20081 - Motorola 68K instruction for no operation (NOP)
  • 20160 - the smallest order belonging to two non-isomorphic simple groups: the alternating group A8 and the Chevalley group A2(4)
  • 20161 - the largest integer that can't be expressed as a sum of two abundant numbers
  • 20230 - pentagonal pyramidal number
  • 20412 - Leyland number
  • 20540 - square pyramidal number
  • 20569 - tetranacci number
  • 20965 - chiliagonal number
  • 21147 - Bell number
  • 21181 - one of nine remaining Seventeen or Bust numbers in the Sierpinski problem
  • 21856 - octahedral number
  • 22050 - pentagonal pyramidal number
  • 22140 - square pyramidal number
  • 22222 - Kaprekar number
  • 22447 - cuban prime
  • 22527 - Woodall number
  • 22699 - one of nine remaining Seventeen or Bust numbers in the Sierpinski problem
  • 23401 - Leyland number
  • 23409 - sum of the cubes of the first 17 positive integers
  • 23497 - cuban prime
  • 23821 - square pyramidal number
  • 23969 - octahedral number
  • 23976 - pentagonal pyramidal number
  • 24211 - Zeisel number
  • 24571 - cuban prime
  • 24631 - Wedderburn-Etherington number
  • 24737 - one of nine remaining Seventeen or Bust numbers in the Sierpinski problem
  • 25011 - the first composite number that in base 10 remains composite after any insertion of a digit
  • 25085 - Zeisel number
  • 25117 - cuban prime
  • 25205 - largest number whose factorial is less than 10100000
  • 25585 - square pyramidal number
  • 26214 - octahedral number
  • 26227 - cuban prime
  • 26861 - smallest number below which there are more primes of the form 4k + 1 than of the form 4k + 3
  • 27434 - square pyramidal number
  • 27559 - Zeisel number
  • 27720 - smallest number divisible by the numbers 1 to 12 (there is no smaller number divisible by the numbers 1 to 11)
  • 27846 - harmonic divisor number
  • 27952 - chiliagonal number
  • 28158 - pentagonal pyramidal number
  • 28374 - smallest integer to start a run of six consecutive integers with the same number of divisors
  • 28595 - octahedral number
  • 28657 - Fibonacci number, Markov number
  • 29241 - sum of the cubes of the first 18 positive integers
  • 29341 - Carmichael number
  • 29370 - square pyramidal number
  • 30000 - round number
  • 30029 - primorial prime
  • 30030 - primorial
  • 30240 - harmonic divisor number
  • 30420 - pentagonal pyramidal number
  • 30694 - open meandric number
  • 31116 - octahedral number
  • 31337 - pronounced elite, an alternate way to spell 1337, an obfuscated alphabet made with numbers and punctuation, known and used in the gamer, hacker and BBS cultures.
  • 31395 - square pyramidal number
  • 31397 - prime number followed by primal prime gap of 72.
  • 31929 - Zeisel number
  • 32760 - harmonic divisor number
  • 32761 - 1812, centered hexagonal number
  • 32767 - 215 - 1, largest positive value for a signed (two's complement) 16-bit integer on a computer.
  • 32768 - 215, maximum absolute value of a negative value for a signed (two's complement) 16-bit integer on a computer.
  • 32800 - pentagonal pyramidal number
  • 32993 - Leyland number
  • 33461 - Pell number, Markov number
  • 33511 - square pyramidal number
  • 33661 - one of nine remaining Seventeen or Bust numbers in the Sierpinski problem
  • 33781 - octahedral number
  • 34483 - cousin prime
  • 34487 - cousin prime
  • 34499 - twin prime
  • 34501 - twin prime
  • 35720 - square pyramidal number
  • 35840 - number of ounces in a long ton (2,240 pounds)
  • 35890 - tribonacci number
  • 35899 - alternating factorial
  • 35937 - chiliagonal number
  • 36100 - sum of the cubes of the first 19 positive integers
  • 36594 - octahedral number
  • 37378 - semi-meandric number
  • 37666 - Markov number
  • 37926 - pentagonal pyramidal number
  • 38024 - square pyramidal number
  • 38962 - Kaprekar number
  • 39559 - octahedral number
  • 39648 - tetranacci number
  • 40000 - round number
  • 40320 - smallest factorial that is not a highly composite number
  • 40425 - square pyramidal number
  • 40678 - pentagonal pyramidal number
  • 40804 - palindromic square
  • 41041 - Carmichael number
  • 41616 - triangular square number
  • 41835 - Motzkin number
  • 42680 - octahedral number
  • 42925 - square pyramidal number
  • 43261 - Markov number
  • 43560 - pentagonal pyramidal number
  • 43691 - Wagstaff prime
  • 44100 - sum of the cubes of the first 20 positive integers, sampling rate of Red Book-compliant audio compact disks
  • 44920 - chiliagonal number
  • 44944 - palindromic square
  • 45360 - first number to have 100 factors (including 1 and itself)
  • 46233 - sum of the first eight factorials
  • 46368 - Fibonacci number
  • 46656 - 6@2 using super-exponentiation = 66
  • 46657 - Carmichael number
  • '46664 - Nelson Mandela's prisoner number
  • 47058 - primary pseudoperfect number
  • 49151 - Woodall number
  • 49726 - pentagonal pyramidal number
  • 50000 - round number
  • 51641 - Markov number
  • 52375 - Address of the office building in the Counter-Strike map cs office
  • 52633 - Carmichael number
  • 53016 - pentagonal pyramidal number
  • 53361 - sum of the cubes of the first 21 positive integers
  • 54205 - Zeisel number
  • 54901 - chiliagonal number
  • 55440 - colossally abundant number
  • 55459 - one of nine remaining Seventeen or Bust numbers in the Sierpinski problem
  • 55860 - harmonic divisor number
  • 56011 - Wedderburn-Etherington number
  • 56448 - pentagonal pyramidal number
  • 58367 - smallest integer that can't be expressed as a sum of fewer than 1079 tenth powers
  • 58786 - Catalan number
  • 59049 = 310
  • 59081 - Zeisel number
  • 60000 - round number
  • 60049 - Leyland number
  • 62210 - Markov number
  • 62745 - Carmichael number
  • 63020 - amicable number with 76084
  • 63360 - inches in a mile
  • 63750 - pentagonal pyramidal number
  • 63973 - Carmichael number
  • 64009 - sum of the cubes of the first 22 positive integers
  • 65023 - Carol number
  • 65279 - Unicode code point for byte order mark
  • 65534 - Unicode code point guaranteed not to be a character
  • 65535 - largest value for an unsigned 16-bit integer on a computer.
  • 65536 - 2^16 (power of two), also 2↑↑4 using Knuth's up-arrow notation, smallest integer with exactly 17 divisors
  • 65537 - Fermat prime
  • 65792 - Leyland number
  • 65880 - chiliagonal number
  • 66012 - tribonacci number
  • 66047 - Kynea number
  • 66198 - Giuga number
  • 67607 - largest of nine remaining Seventeen or Bust numbers in the Sierpinski problem
  • 67626 - pentagonal pyramidal number
  • 68000 - processor used in Apple Macintosh computers before PowerPC (also 68K processor family)
  • 68020 - processor used in Apple Macintosh computers before PowerPC
  • 68030 - processor used in Apple Macintosh computers before PowerPC
  • 68040 - processor used in Apple Macintosh computers before PowerPC
  • 68881 - math coprocessor used in with 68020 and 68030
  • 68882 - math coprocessor used in with 68020 and 68030
  • 69105 - Infocom in-joke
  • 69632 - Leyland number
  • 69696 - square of 264; only known palindromic square that can be expressed as the sum of a pair of twin primes: 69696 = 34847 + 34849.
  • 70000 - round number
  • 71656 - pentagonal pyramidal number
  • 73712 - number of n-Queens Problem solutions for n = 13,
  • 74205 - registry number of the USS Defiant on Star Trek Deep Space Nine
  • 74656 - registry number of the USS Voyager on Star Trek Voyager
  • 75025 - Fibonacci number, Markov number
  • 75361 - Carmichael number
  • 76084 - amicable number with 63020
  • 76176 - sum of the cubes of the first 23 positive integers
  • 76424 - tetranacci number
  • 77778 - Kaprekar number
  • 77857 - chiliagonal number
  • 78125 = 57
  • 78557 - conjectured to be the smallest Sierpinski number
  • 80000 - round number
  • 80286 - model number of the Intel 80286 chip
  • 80386 - model number of the Intel 80386 chip
  • 80486 - model number of the Intel 80486 chip
  • 80782 - Pell number
  • 82656 - Kaprekar number
  • 86400 - seconds in a day; 28801-gonal number; highly powerful number; solution to Singmaster's problem when n = 11
  • 87360 - unitary perfect number
  • 90000 - sum of the cubes of the first 24 positive integers
  • 90625 - the only five-digit automorphic number
  • 90832 - chiliagonal number
  • 93312 - Leyland number
  • 94932 - Leyland number
  • 95121 - Kaprekar number
  • 96557 - Markov number
  • 99999 - Kaprekar number

  Results from FactBites:
 
10000 (number) - definition of 10000 (number) in Encyclopedia (412 words)
Ten thousand (10000) is the natural number following 9999 and preceding 10001.
The Greek prefix for 10,000 is myria-, from which myriad is derived.
78557 - conjectured to be the smallest Sierpinski number
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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