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Encyclopedia > .50 BMG
.50 BMG

From left: .50 BMG, 300 Win Mag, .308 Winchester, 7.62 Soviet, 5.56 NATO, .22LR
Type Rifle
Place of origin United States
Service history
In service 1914 to present
Used by United States Military, British Military
Wars WWI, WWII, Korean War, Vietnam War, Falklands war, Gulf War, War on Terror, Iraq War
Production history
Designer John Browning
Specifications
Bullet diameter .511 in (12.98 mm)
Neck diameter .560 in (14.22 mm)
Shoulder diameter .741 in (18.82 mm)
Base diameter .804 in (20.42 mm)
Rim diameter .804 in (20.42 mm)
Case length 3.91 in (99.31 mm)
Overall length 5.45 in (138.43 mm)
Primer type Proprietary
Filling weight 289 gr. (water)
Ballistic performance
Bullet weight/type Velocity Energy
647 gr Speer 3044 ft/s
(~928 m/s)
13144 ft·lbf
(~17876 J)
655 gr ADI 3029 ft/s
(~923 m/s)
13350 ft·lbf
(~18156 J)
700 gr Barnes 2978 ft/s
(~908 m/s)
13971 ft·lbf
(~19001 J)
750 gr Lapua 2618 ft/s
(~798 m/s)
11419 ft·lbf
(~15530 J)
800 gr Barnes 2895 ft/s
(~883 m/s)
14895 ft·lbf
(~20257 J)
Test barrel length: 45 in
Source: Ammoguide.com
.50 BMG rounds and 20MM Vulcan round, with a golf ball and a stick of RAM posed to provide scale.
The .50 BMG cartridge.
The fired and retrieved copper jacket from an M2 "ball" round.
The fired and retrieved copper jacket from an M2 "ball" round.

The .50 Browning Machine Gun (12.7 × 99 mm NATO) or .50 BMG is a cartridge developed for the Browning .50 Caliber machine gun in the late 1910s. Entering service officially in 1921, the round is based on a greatly scaled-up 30-'06 cartridge. The cartridge itself has been made in many variants: multiple generations of regular ball, tracer, armor piercing, incendiary, and saboted sub-caliber rounds. The rounds intended for machine guns are linked using metallic links. Image File history File links Rifle_cartridge_comparison. ... .300 Winchester Magnum (known as . ... NATO 7. ... Yugoslavian version of the 7. ... U.S. Military 5. ... The . ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Combatants United Nations:  Republic of Korea,  Australia,  Belgium,  Luxembourg,  Canada,  Colombia,  Ethiopia,  France,  Greece,  Luxembourg,  Netherlands,  New Zealand,  Philippines,  South Africa,  Thailand,  Turkey,  United Kingdom,  United States Medical staff:  Denmark,  Australia,  Italy,  Norway,  Sweden Communist states:  Democratic People’s Republic of Korea,  Peoples Republic of China,  Soviet Union Commanders... Combatants Republic of Vietnam United States Republic of Korea Thailand Australia New Zealand The Philippines National Front for the Liberation of South Vietnam Democratic Republic of Vietnam People’s Republic of China Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea Strength US 1,000,000 South Korea 300,000 Australia 48,000... Combatants Argentina United Kingdom Commanders Presidente Leopoldo Galtieri Vice Admiral Juan Lombardo Brigadier General Ernesto Crespo Brigade General Mario Menéndez Prime minister Margaret Thatcher Admiral Sir John Fieldhouse Rear-Admiral Sandy Woodward Major General Jeremy Moore Casualties 649 killed 1,068 wounded 11,313 taken prisoner 75 fixed wing... Combatants United States & US-led Coalition Republic of Iraq Commanders Norman Schwarzkopf Saddam Hussein Strength 883,863 360,000 Casualties 378 dead, 1,000 wounded see section below The Gulf War or the Persian Gulf War (16 January 1991–28 February 1991)[1][2] was a conflict between Iraq and... This article is about U.S. actions after September 11, 2001. ... For other uses, see Iraq war (disambiguation). ... .357 Magnum cartridges, containing bullets A bullet is a solid projectile propelled by a firearm and is normally made from metal (usually lead). ... The percussion cap or primer was the crucial invention that enabled firearms to fire in any weather. ... A grain is a unit of mass equal to 0. ... Feet per second is a unit of speed; it expressses the number of feet traveled in one second. ... Metre per second (U.S. spelling: meter per second) is an SI derived unit of both speed (scalar) and velocity (vector), defined by distance in metres divided by time in seconds. ... The foot-pound force (symbol: ft·lbf) is an English unit of work or energy. ... The joule (IPA pronunciation: or ) (symbol: J) is the SI unit of energy. ... A grain is a unit of mass equal to 0. ... Feet per second is a unit of speed; it expressses the number of feet traveled in one second. ... Metre per second (U.S. spelling: meter per second) is an SI derived unit of both speed (scalar) and velocity (vector), defined by distance in metres divided by time in seconds. ... The foot-pound force (symbol: ft·lbf) is an English unit of work or energy. ... The joule (IPA pronunciation: or ) (symbol: J) is the SI unit of energy. ... A grain is a unit of mass equal to 0. ... Feet per second is a unit of speed; it expressses the number of feet traveled in one second. ... Metre per second (U.S. spelling: meter per second) is an SI derived unit of both speed (scalar) and velocity (vector), defined by distance in metres divided by time in seconds. ... The foot-pound force (symbol: ft·lbf) is an English unit of work or energy. ... The joule (IPA pronunciation: or ) (symbol: J) is the SI unit of energy. ... A grain is a unit of mass equal to 0. ... Feet per second is a unit of speed; it expressses the number of feet traveled in one second. ... Metre per second (U.S. spelling: meter per second) is an SI derived unit of both speed (scalar) and velocity (vector), defined by distance in metres divided by time in seconds. ... The foot-pound force (symbol: ft·lbf) is an English unit of work or energy. ... The joule (IPA pronunciation: or ) (symbol: J) is the SI unit of energy. ... A grain is a unit of mass equal to 0. ... Feet per second is a unit of speed; it expressses the number of feet traveled in one second. ... Metre per second (U.S. spelling: meter per second) is an SI derived unit of both speed (scalar) and velocity (vector), defined by distance in metres divided by time in seconds. ... The foot-pound force (symbol: ft·lbf) is an English unit of work or energy. ... The joule (IPA pronunciation: or ) (symbol: J) is the SI unit of energy. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1668x2098, 721 KB) Author: Ry Jones (the person uploading the file) Summary: 50 BMG rounds shown against commonly available items to allow people that do not have access to a 50 BMG round to understand the size in relation to an... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1668x2098, 721 KB) Author: Ry Jones (the person uploading the file) Summary: 50 BMG rounds shown against commonly available items to allow people that do not have access to a 50 BMG round to understand the size in relation to an... M2 machine gun round from a B17. ... M2 machine gun round from a B17. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2816 × 2112 pixel, file size: 2. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2816 × 2112 pixel, file size: 2. ... Rimmed, centerfire . ... It has been suggested that K6 HMG be merged into this article or section. ... .30-06 Springfield cartridge specifications. ... An example of FMJ bullets in their usual shapes: pointed (spitzer) for the rifle and round for the pistol. ... Tracers from M16 rifles on U.S. Army firing range Tracer ammunition (tracers) use special bullets that are modified to accept a small pyrotechnic charge in their base. ... Armour piercing shell of the APBC 1 Light weight ballistic cap 2 Steel alloy piercing shell 3 Desensitized bursting charge (TNT, Trinitrophenol, RDX...) 4 Fuse (set with delay to explode inside the target) 5 Bourrelet (front) and driving band (rear) An armour piercing shell is a type of ammunition designed... For the 2008 film of the same name, see Incendiary (film). ... An APFSDS separating from its spindle sabot Anti-tank flechette round with its sabot A sabot refers to a device named for a shoe used in a firearm or cannon to fire a projectile or bullet that is smaller than the bore diameter. ... A Kinetic energy penetrator, an example of a Sub-caliber round. ...


The .50 BMG cartridge is also used in long-range target and sniper rifles, as well as other .50 machine guns. The use in single-shot and semi-automatic rifles has resulted in many specialized match-grade rounds not used in .50 machine guns. A McMillan TAC-50 .50BMG sniper rifle was used by Canadian Corporal Rob Furlong to bring off the longest-range confirmed sniper kill in history, when he shot a Taliban insurgent at 2,430 metres (7972 feet/1.509 miles) during the 2002 campaign in Afghanistan.[1] The M40, United States Marine Corps standard-issue sniper rifle. ... Match grade refers to something suitable for a match, that is, able to compete with others. ... The McMillan TAC-50 is a military/law enforcement sniper rifle chambered in . ... The M40, United States Marine Corps standard-issue sniper rifle. ... Rob Furlong is a former Corporal in the Canadian Armed Forces who holds the record for the longest sniper kill in combat. ... Arkansas Army National Guard soldiers practice sniper marksmanship at their firing range near Baghdad, Iraq on February 15, 2005. ... For the position of women during the Talibans rule, see Taliban treatment of women. ...


A wide variety of ammunition is available, and the availability of match grade ammunition has increased the usefulness of .50 caliber rifles by allowing more accurate fire than lower quality rounds. Boxes of ammunition clog a warehouse in Baghdad Ammunition is a generic military term meaning (the assembly of) a projectile and its propellant. ...

Contents

History

The round was conceptualized during WWI by John Browning in response to a requirement for an anti-aircraft weapon. The round itself is based on a scaled-up .30-06 Springfield design, and the machine gun was based on a scaled-up M1919/M1917 design that Browning had initially developed at the turn of century (but which was not adopted by the U.S. military until 1917, hence the model designation). The new heavy machine gun, the Browning M2 .50 caliber machine gun, was used heavily in aircraft, especially during World War II, though its airborne use is limited to helicopters at present. It was and still is used on the ground as well, both vehicle mounted, in fixed fortifications and on occasion carried by infantry. The incendiary rounds were especially good against aircraft, and AP rounds for destroying concrete bunkers, structures, and lighter AFVs. “The Great War ” redirects here. ... .30-06 Springfield cartridge specifications. ... It has been suggested that K6 HMG be merged into this article or section. ... An armoured fighting vehicle (AFV) is a military vehicle, protected by armour and armed with weapons. ...


The development of the .50 round is sometimes confused with the German 13.2 mm TuF, which was developed by Germany for an anti-tank rifle to combat British tanks during WWI. However, the development of the U.S. .50 round was started before this later German project was completed or even known to the Allied countries. When word of the German anti-tank round spread, there was some debate as to whether it should be copied and used as a base for the new machine gun cartridge. However, after some analysis the German ammunition was ruled out, both because performance was inferior to the modified Springfield .30-06 round and because it was a semi-rimmed cartridge, making it sub-optimal for an automatic weapon. The round's dimensions and ballistic traits are different. The M2 would, however, go on to function as an anti-armour machine gun, and decades later, be used in high-powered rifles. The concept of a .50 machine gun was not an invention of this era; this caliber (.50) had been used in Maxim machine guns and in a number of manual machine guns such as the Gatling. An anti-tank rifle is a rifle designed to penetrate the armour of vehicles, particularly tanks. ...


During World War II it found use in penetrating lightly armoured vehicles, including aircraft. An upgraded variant of the Browning machine gun used during World War II is still in use today as the well known M2 machine gun. Since the mid-1950s, some armoured personnel carriers and utility vehicles have been made to withstand 12.7 mm machine gun fire, thus making it a much less flexible weapon. It still has more penetrating power than light machine guns such as general purpose machine guns, but is difficult to maintain and aim in field conditions. Its range and accuracy, however, are superior to light machine guns when fixed and water cooled, and has not been replaced as the standard caliber for western vehicle mounted machine guns (Soviet and CIS armoured vehicles mount 12.7 mm DShK, NSV, which are ballistically very similar to the .50 BMG, or 14.5 mm KPV machine guns, which have significantly superior armour penetration compared to any 12.7 mm round). Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... It has been suggested that K6 HMG be merged into this article or section. ... The MG 34 - the first Universelles Maschinengewehr forerunner of the modern GPMG, shown here in two different mountings. ... The M249 Squad Automatic Weapon, one of the most popular modern 5. ... The DShK (ДШК, for Дегтярёва Шпагина Крупнокалиберный, Degtyarev-Shpagin Large Calibre) is a Soviet heavy anti-aircraft machine gun firing 12. ... The NSV is a 12. ... The KPV heavy machine gun is a Soviet designed 14. ...


The Barrett M82 .50 Caliber rifle and later variants were born during the 1980s and have upgraded the anti-material power of the military sniper. A skilled sniper can effectively neutralize an infantry unit by picking off several soldiers at a very long range, without revealing his precise location, then spend a few hours moving to a new position (whether the infantry unit decides to hunt down the sniper or to retreat), before firing again. This article does not cite its references or sources. ...


The round is different from the one used in the Boys anti-tank rifle, developed in the 1930s in Britain, which used a belted design and a slightly larger-diameter bullet, .55 Boys (13.9 x 99B). Boyes Anti-tank Rifle Type Anti tank rifle Nationality United Kingdom Era World War II History Date of design 1937 Production period 1937 - ? Service duration 1937 - 194? Operators United Kingdom, Empire/Commonwealth, War service World War II Specifications Type Bolt action rifle Calibre . ...


Power

A common method for understanding the actual power of a cartridge is by comparing muzzle energies. The Springfield .30-06, the standard caliber for American soldiers in World War II and a popular caliber amongst American hunters, can produce muzzle energies between 2000 and 3000 foot pounds of energy (between 3 and 4 kilojoules). A .50 BMG round can produce between 10,000 and 13,000 foot pounds (between 14 and 18 kilojoules) or more, depending on its powder and bullet type, as well as the rifle it was fired from. Due to the high ballistic coefficient of the bullet, the .50 BMG's trajectory also suffers less "drift" from cross-winds than smaller and lighter calibers. .30-06 Springfield cartridge specifications. ... The foot-pound force (symbol: ft·lbf) is an English unit of work or energy. ...


US Military Cartridge Types

NOTE: .50 BMG cartridges are also produced commercially with a plethora of different bullets and to a number of different specifications.

  • Cartridge, Caliber .50, Tracer, M1
Tracer for observing fire, signaling, target designation, and incendiary purposes. The M1 has a red tip.
  • Cartridge, Caliber .50, Incendiary, M1
This cartridge is used against unarmored, flammable targets. The incendiery bullet has a light blue tip.
  • Cartridge, Caliber .50, Ball, M2
This cartridge is used against personnel and unarmored targets.
  • Cartridge, Caliber .50, Armor-Piercing, M2
This cartridge is used against lightly armored vehicles, protective shelters, and personnel, and can be identified by its black tip.
  • Cartridge, Caliber .50, Armor-Piercing-Incendiary, M8
This cartridge is used, in place of the armor piercing round, against armored, flammable targets. The bullet is colored with silver tip.
  • Cartridge, Caliber .50, Tracer, M10
Tracer for observing fire, signaling, target designation, and incendiary purposes. Designed to be less intense than the M1, the M10 has an orange tip.
  • Cartridge, Caliber .50, Tracer, M17
Tracer for observing fire, signaling, target designation, and incendiary purposes. Can be fired from the M82/M107 series of rifles.
  • Cartridge, Caliber .50, Armor-Piercing-Incendiary-Tracer, M20
This cartridge is used, in place of the armor piercing round, against armored, flammable targets, with a tracer element for observation purposes. The tip of the bullet is colored red with a ring of aluminum paint. This cartridge is effectively a variant of the M8 Armor-Piercing Incendiary with the added tracer element. Can be fired from the M82/M107 series of rifles.
  • Cartridge, Caliber .50, Tracer, Headlight, M21
Tracer for use in observing fire during air-to-air combat. Designed to be more visible, the M21 is 3 times more brilliant than the M1 tracer.
  • Cartridge, Caliber .50, Incendiary, M23
This cartridge is used against unarmored, flammable targets. The tip of the bullet is painted blue with a light blue ring.
  • Cartridge, Caliber .50, Ball, M33
This cartridge is used against personnel and unarmored targets. Can be fired from the M82/M107 series of rifles.
  • Cartridge, Caliber .50, Saboted Light Armor Penetrator, M903
This is a Saboted Light Armor Penetrator (SLAP) round, which uses a smaller 355-360 grain bullet fitted in an amber colored plastic sabot. For use only in the M2 series of machine guns.
  • Cartridge, Caliber .50, Saboted Light Armor Penetrator-Tracer, M962
Like the M903, this is a Saboted Light Armor Penetrator (SLAP) round, with the only difference being that the M962 also has a tracer element for observing fire, target designation, and incendiary purposes. Uses a red colored plastic sabot for indentification. For use only in the M2 series of machine guns.
  • Cartridge, Caliber .50, Ball, XM1022
A long-range match cartridge specifically designed for long range work using the M107 rifle.
A so-called "combined effects" cartridge, the Mk 211 Mod 0 High-Explosive-Incendiary-Armor-Piercing (HEIAP) cartridge contains a .30 caliber tungsten penetrator, zirconium powder, and Composition A explosive. Cartridge is identified by a green tip with a grey ring, and can be used in any .50 caliber weapon in US inventory with the exception of the M85 machine gun.
  • Cartridge, Caliber .50, Armor-Piercing-Incendiary-Tracer, Mk 300 Mod 0
As with the Mk 211 Mod 0, but with a tracer component. Cartridge is identified by an unknown coloring, and likely can be used in any .50 caliber weapon in US inventory with the exception of the M85 machine gun, as with the Mk 211 Mod 0.

This article does not cite its references or sources. ... M107 diagram The M107 Long Range Sniper Rifle is a semi-automatic . ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... M107 diagram The M107 Long Range Sniper Rifle is a semi-automatic . ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... M107 diagram The M107 Long Range Sniper Rifle is a semi-automatic . ... It has been suggested that K6 HMG be merged into this article or section. ... It has been suggested that K6 HMG be merged into this article or section. ... M107 diagram The M107 Long Range Sniper Rifle is a semi-automatic . ... The Raufoss Mk211 round The Raufoss Mk211 is a . ...

Legal issues

The specified maximum diameter of an unfired .50 BMG bullet is .510 inch; while this appears to be over the .50 inch (12.7 mm) maximum allowed for non-sporting Title I small arms under the U.S. National Firearms Act, the barrel of a .50 BMG rifle is only .50 inches across the rifling lands, and slightly larger in the grooves. The oversized bullet is formed to the bore size upon firing, forming a tight seal and engaging the rifling, a mechanism which in firearms terms is known as engraving. Subject to political controversy due to the great power of the cartridge (it is the most powerful commonly available cartridge not considered a destructive device under the National Firearms Act), it remains popular among long-range shooters for its accuracy and external ballistics. While the .50 BMG round is able to deliver accurate shot placement (if match grade ammunition is used) at ranges over 1,000 yards (900 m), smaller caliber rifles produce better scores and tighter groups in 1000 yard competitions. This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Rifling of a Canon de 75 modèle 1897 A 35 caliber Remington, with a microgrove rifled barrel with a right hand twist. ... A destructive device is a firearm or explosive device that, in the United States, is regulated by the National Firearms Act of 1934. ... External ballistics is the part of ballistics tht refers to the behavior of a bullet after it exits the barrel and before it hits the target. ...


Since the adoption of .50 BMG rifles by military sniper units, there has been a growing gun control movement in some states, including California, New York, Massachusetts, Hawaii, and Illinois, to ban civilian possession of .50 BMG rifles and ammunition. Bill AB50 in California, passed in 2004, classifies all .50 BMG rifles of any action type as assault weapons, which are illegal to import into the state or transfer to any but a state agency or dealer licensed to purchase them. The bill's sponsor, California Assemblyman Paul Koretz, claimed that the .50 BMG "would be an ideal choice for use in an act of terrorism." However, it is considered by gun experts to be a poor choice because of its size, weight and cost. The considerable size and weight of .50 BMG rifles, high cost, and lack of concealibility make them a poor choice for criminal use. With lengths usually between four and five feet and weighing 20-40 pounds (a large .50 caliber rifle weighs slightly less than an olympic sized barbell), they are unwieldy and difficult to conceal. It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Gun politics. ... Official language(s) English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Area  Ranked 3rd  - Total 158,302 sq mi (410,000 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 770 miles (1,240 km)  - % water 4. ... NY redirects here. ... Official language(s) English Capital Boston Largest city Boston Area  Ranked 44th  - Total 10,555 sq mi (27,360 km²)  - Width 183 miles (295 km)  - Length 113 miles (182 km)  - % water 13. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Springfield Largest city Chicago Largest metro area Chicago Area  Ranked 25th  - Total 57,918 sq mi (149,998 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 390 miles (629 km)  - % water 4. ... In times of armed conflict a civilian is any person who is not a combatant. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... Paul Koretz (D-West Hollywood) was elected to represent the California 42nd Assembly District on November 7, 2000, and was re-elected twice in 2002, and again in 2004. ...


After AB50 was passed, Barrett proceeded to cease sales and service of .50 BMG rifles to California law enforcement agencies. An official press release from the owner of Barrett Firearms can be found on the company's website, as follows: "The California legislature has banned the .50 BMG from the good citizens of the state of California, violating their rights and the constitution of our republic. Therefore, Barrett will not sell to or service any California government agencies." The Barrett Firearms Company was founded in 1980 by Ronnie Barrett. ...


In response to legal action against the .50 BMG in the United States and Europe, an alternative chambering was developed. The .510 DTC Europ uses the same bullet, but has slightly different case dimensions. .510 DTC cases can be made by fire-forming .50 BMG cases. The new round has almost identical ballistics, but because of the different dimensions, rifles chambered for the .50 BMG cannot fire the .510 DTC, and therefore do not fall under many of the same legal prohibitions. Barrett offers a similar alternative, the .416 Barrett, which is based on a shortened .50 BMG case necked down to .416 caliber (10.3 mm). The . ... A wildcat cartridge, or wildcat, is a custom cartridge for which ammunition and firearms are not mass produced. ...


The primary civilian users of .50 caliber rifles, which range in price from around USD$1,800[2] for single shot models to nearly USD$8,000[3] for the Barrett M82A1, are long-range target shooters; the Fifty Caliber Shooters Association, for instance, holds .50 BMG shooting matches nationwide.[4] This article does not cite its references or sources. ...


The U.S. Coast Guard uses .50 BMG weapons for drug interdictions. Effective interdiction requires that personnel on Coast Guard cutters be able to deliver accurate fire to stop high-speed drug runners. Similarly, .50 BMG weapons have attracted attention from law enforcement agencies; they have been adopted by the NYPD. If it becomes necessary to immobilize a vehicle, a .50 BMG round in the engine block will shut it down quickly. If it is necessary to breach barriers, a .50 BMG round will penetrate most commercial brick walls and concrete blocks. A coast guard is a national organization responsible for various services at sea. ... The New York City Police Department (NYPD) , the largest police department in the United States, has primary responsibility for law enforcement and investigation within the five boroughs of New York City. ...


Partial list of .50 BMG weapons

Carbine rifles: A carbine is a firearm similar to, but generally shorter and less powerful than, a rifle or musket of a given period. ...

  • Barrett M82CQ (a carbine version of the M82A3)

Rifles: The Barrett Firearms Company was founded in 1980 by Ronnie Barrett. ... A rifle is a firearm with a barrel that has a helical groove or pattern of grooves (rifling) cut into the barrel walls. ...

Machine guns The Barrett Firearms Company was founded in 1980 by Ronnie Barrett. ... Zastava Arms is a subsidiary of Zastava, and is the sole producer of military firearms in Serbia. ... Full Name: Long-Range Rifle M93 Black Arrow (Dalekometna puška M93 Crna Strela) Callibre: 12. ... A machine gun is a fully-automatic firearm that is capable of firing bullets in rapid succession. ...

It has been suggested that K6 HMG be merged into this article or section. ...

See also

S&W Model 500 night firing. ... This article lists firearm cartridges which have a bullet in the 12 mm (.472 in) caliber range. ... The 12. ... The 14. ... Located below is an extended list of small arms, ranging from pistols to machine guns and even to large handheld devices such as grenade launchers and anti-tank rifles. ... From left to right: .50 BMG, 300 Win Mag, .308 Winchester, 7. ... The Raufoss Mk211 round The Raufoss Mk211 is a . ... The . ... Many US states have legislated gun (firearm) laws, independent of existing federal firearms laws. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...

External links

References

  1. ^ Friscolanti, Michael (5/15/2006). "We were abandoned", Macleans 119 (20).
  2. ^ ALS
  3. ^ The Model 82A1/M107 from Barrett Firearms
  4. ^ Match dates at the Fifty Caliber Shooters Association
United States infantry weapons of World War II and Korea
Side arms
Colt M1911/A1 | M1917 revolver | Smith & Wesson "Victory" revolver
Rifles & carbines
Springfield M1903 | M1 Garand | M1 Carbine | M1941 Johnson | Browning Automatic Rifle (BAR)
Submachine guns
Thompson ("Tommy Gun") M1928/M1/A1 | M3 "Grease Gun" | Reising M50/M55 | United Defense M42
Machine guns & other larger weapons
Browning M1917 | Browning M1919 | Johnson LMG | Browning M2 HMG | Bazooka | M2 flamethrower
Cartridges used during World War II and the Korean War
.45 ACP | .38 Special | .30-06 Springfield | .30 Carbine | 9 mm Luger | .50 BMG

 
 

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