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Encyclopedia > Éothéod

In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, the Éothéod (horse-people, also horse-land) were a race of Northmen who were the ancestors of the Rohirrim. J. R. R. Tolkien in 1916. ... Northmen was a common term for the Vikings, famously used in the prayer From the fury of the Northmen deliver us, O Lord!, doubtfully attributed to monks of the English monasteries plundered by Viking raids in the 8th and 9th centuries. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth, the Rohirrim were the people of Rohan. ...

During the Third Age, first mention of the Éothéod is when they migrated under their king Frumgar to the confined area between the rivers Langwell and Greylin, sources of the Great River Anduin, near where the Ered Mithrin met the Misty Mountains. They went that way after the fall of Angmar, away from the ravages of the Easterlings and Orcs. The Third Age is a fictional time period from J. R. R. Tolkiens universe of Middle-earth. ... Langwell is a river in J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth, one of the two rivers, along with Greylin, that meet in the far north to form the beginnings of the Anduin river. ... Greylin is a river in J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth, one of the two (the other being the Langwell river) which flows from the north Anduin river. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional Middle-earth, the Anduin or Great River of Wilderland is the longest river in the Third Age (the original Sindarin name means Long River), rising east of the Misty Mountains and flowing south through Wilderland and eastern Gondor. ... In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, the Ered Mithrin or Grey Mountains was a large mountain range to the north of Rhovanion. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fantasy world of Middle-earth, the Misty Mountains (also known by its Sindarin name of Hithaeglir - misspelled as Hithaiglin on the original Lord of the Rings map - and as the Mountains of Mist) are a long mountain range, running north to south, between Eriador... Angmar is a fictional kingdom in J.R.R. Tolkiens universe of Middle-earth. ... In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, the Easterlings were Men who lived in the east of Middle-earth, and were enemies of the Free Peoples. ... Orc or Ork, an Old English word (orc-neas from Beowulf) for the zombie-like monsters of Grendels race was revived by J. R. R. Tolkien in his Middle-earth legendarium. ...


Some time later their king Fram, son of Frumgar, slew the dragon Scatha. The Éothéod capital was named Framsburg in his honour. Fram's son Léod was killed trying to tame the horse Felaróf, first of the Mearas of Rohan. His son Eorl the Young tamed the horse, taking it into service as compensation for his father's life. J. R. R. Tolkiens universe of Middle-earth features dragons closely based on those of European legend. ... Scatha, known as Scatha the Worm, was a dragon in J. R. R. Tolkiens fantasy universe of Middle-earth. ... Binomial name Equus caballus The Horse (Equus caballus) is a large ungulate mammal, one of the seven modern species of the genus Equus. ... This article is about a fictional character. ...


During the rule of the ruling Steward of Gondor Cirion, Gondor faced an attack by the evil Balchoth, and Cirion sent messengers to the Éothéod capital. King Eorl answered the call for help, and rode out with most of the Éothéod to help their allies of old, leaving only a few warriors behind to protect his people. The Riders arrived just in time to help the army of Gondor at the Field of Celebrant, and after defeating the enemy Cirion asked the Éothéod to watch over the depopulated province of Calenardhon. The Stewards of Gondor were rulers from J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium of Middle-earth. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens universe of Middle-earth, Cirion, son of Boromir I, was the twelfth ruling Steward of Gondor. ... In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, the Easterlings were Men who lived in the east of Middle-earth, and were enemies of the Free Peoples. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth, the Field of Celebrant was the place where a fierce battle was fought. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle_earth, Calenardhon was the place which became Rohan. ...


Three months later Cirion gave Calenardhon as a gift to Eorl and his people, and Eorl swore his Oath of eternal friendship. Messengers were sent north, and the Éothéod completely removed to the plains of Calenardhon. In J. R. R. Tolkiens universe of Middle-earth, the Oath of Eorl is the alliance sworn between the Middle-earth nations of Rohan and Gondor. ...


The Éothéod renamed themselves Eorlingas or "followers of Eorl", but in Sindarin they became known as the Rohirrim, or Horse-lords, and their country became known as Rohan, the Riddermark. Sindarin is an artificial language (or conlang) developed by J. R. R. Tolkien. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth, the Rohirrim were the people of Rohan. ... Rohan, originally Rochand, is a fictional location from J. R. R. Tolkiens universe of Middle-earth. ...


The name Éothéod is a translation into Anglo-Saxon of the original Rohirric Lohtûr, Rohirric "loho-" or "lô-" corresponding to the Anglo-Saxon "éo-", meaning "horse". In the fictional world of Middle-earth by J. R. R. Tolkien, Rohirric is the language of the Rohirrim of Rohan. ...


 
 

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