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Encyclopedia > Émile Loubet
Painting of French statesman Émile Loubet by Fernand-Anne Piestre

Émile François Loubet (December 30, 1838 - December 20, 1929) was a French politician, 7th president of the French republic. This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... December 30 is the 364th day of the year (365th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 1 day remaining. ... 1838 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... December 20 is the 354th day of the year (355th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1929 was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... France - Wikipedia /**/ @import /skins/monobook/IE50Fixes. ... A politician is an individual involved in politics. ... The President of France, known officially as the President of the Republic (Président de la République in French), is Frances elected Head of State. ...


He was born the son of a peasant proprietor and mayor of Marsanne (Drôme). Admitted to the Parisian bar in 1862, he took his doctorate-in-law the next year. He was still a student when he witnessed the sweeping triumph of the Republican party in Paris at the general election in 1863. He settled down to the exercise of his profession in Montélimar, where he married in 1869 Marie Louis Picard. He also inherited a small estate at Grignan. At the crisis of 1870 he became mayor of Montélimar, and thenceforward was a steady supporter of Léon Gambetta. Elected to the Chamber of Deputies in 1876 by Montélimar, he was one of the famous 363 who in June 1877 passed the vote of want of confidence in. the ministry of the duc de Brogue. Marsanne is a little used variety of grape, most common in the northern Rhône, where it often blended with Roussanne. ... Drôme is a département in southeastern France named after the Drôme River. ... Painting of Léon Gambetta by Léon Bonnat Léon Gambetta ( April 2, 1838 - December 31, 1882), French statesman, was born at Cahors. ... 1876 is a leap year starting on Saturday. ... 1877 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ...


In the general election of October he was re-elected, local enthusiasm for him being increased by the fact that the government had driven him from the mayoralty. In the Chamber he occupied himself especially with education, fighting the clerical system established by the Loi Falloux, and working for the establishment of free, obligatory and secular primary instruction. In 1880 he became president of the departmental council in Drôme. His support of the second Jules Ferry ministry and his zeal for the colonial expansion of France gave him considerable weight in the moderate Republican party. Drôme is a département in southeastern France named after the Drôme River. ... Jules Ferry, French statesman Jules François Camille Ferry (April 5, 1832 - March 17, 1893) was a French statesman. ...


He had entered the Senate in 1885, and he became minister of public works in the Tirard ministry (December 1887 to March 1888). In 1892 President Sadi Carnot, who was his personal friend, asked him to form a cabinet. Loubet held the portfolio of the interior with the premiership, and had to deal with the anarchist crimes of that year and with the great strike of Carmaux, in which he acted as arbitrator, giving a decision regarded in many quarters as too favourable to the strikers. He was defeated in November on the question of the Panama scandals, but he retained the ministry of the interior in the next cabinet under Alexandre Ribot, though he resigned on its reconstruction in January. His reputation as an orator of great force and lucidity of exposition and as a safe and honest statesman procured for him in 1896 the presidency of the Senate, and in February 1899 he was chosen president of the republic in succession to Félix Faure by 483 votes as against 279 recorded by Jules Méline, his only serious competitor. 1885 is a common year starting on Thursday. ... French statesman Pierre Tirard Pierre Emmanuel Tirard (September 27, 1827 - November 4, 1893) was a French politician. ... The Panama scandals was a corruption affair in France in the late 19th century, linked to the building of the Panama Canal. ... Alexandre Ribot, French politician Alexandre-Félix-Joseph Ribot (February 7, 1842 - January 13, 1923) was a French statesman, four times Prime Minister. ... French statesman Félix Faure François Félix Faure ( 30 January 1841– 16 February 1899) was President of France from 1895 to his death in 1899. ...


He was marked out for fierce opposition and bitter insult, as the representative of that section of the Republican party which sought the revision of the Dreyfus affair. On the day of President Faure's funeral Paul Déroulède met the troops under General Roget on their return to barracks, and demanded that the general should march on the Elysée. Roget sensibly took his troops back to barracks. At the Auteuil steeplechase in June, the president was struck on the head with a cane by an anti-Dreyfusard. In that month President Loubet summoned Waldeck-Rousseau to form a cabinet, and at the same time entreated Republicans of all shades of opinion to rally to the defence of the state. By the efforts of Loubet and Waldeck-Rousseau the Dreyfus affair was settled, when Loubet, acting on the advice of General Galliffet, minister of war, remitted the ten years' imprisonment to which Dreyfus was condemned at Rennes. Alfred Dreyfus in an army uniform, wearing a mustache. ... Alfred Dreyfus in an army uniform, wearing a mustache. ... Location within France The Parlement de Bretagne (Parliament of Brittany), the most famous building in Rennes, was rebuilt after a terrible fire in 1994. ...


Loubet's presidency saw an acute stage of the clerical question, which was attacked by Waldeck-Rousseau and in still more drastic fashion by the Combes ministry. The French ambassador was recalled from the Vatican in April, 1905, and in July the separation of church and state was voted in the Chamber of Deputies. Feeling had run high between France and Britain over the mutual criticisms passed on the conduct of the South African War and the Dreyfus affair respectively. These differences were composed, by the Anglo-French entente, and in 1904 a convention between the two countries secured the recognition of French claims in Morocco in exchange for non-interference with the British occupation of Egypt. President Loubet belonged to the peasant-proprietor class, and had none of the aristocratic proclivities of President Faure. He inaugurated the Paris Exhibition of 1900, received the Tsar Nicholas II of Russia in September 1901 and paid a visit to Russia in 1902. He also exchanged visits with King Edward VII, with the king of Italy and the king of Spain. During the king of Spain's visit in 1905, an attempt was made on his life, a bomb being thrown under his carriage as he was proceeding with his guest to the opera. His presidency came to an end in January 1906, when he retired into private life. Pierre Marie René Ernest Waldeck-Rousseau ( December 2, 1846 - August 20, 1904) was a French statesman. ... Émile Combes, French politician Émile Combes (1835 - 1921) was a French statesman. ... Vatican may refer to: Holy See Roman Curia Vatican City Vatican Hill Vatican Palace Vatican Library This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... 1905 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... The separation of church and state is a concept in law whereby the structures of state or national government are kept separate from those of religious institutions. ... The Chamber of Deputies is the name given to the lower house of the bicameral legislatures of the following states: Argentina – Argentine Chamber of Deputies (C mara de Diputados) Belgium – Chamber of Deputies of Belgium (Chambre des Repr sentants / Kamer van Volksvertegenwoordigers) Bolivia – Chamber of Deputies of Bolivia (C mara... The word Britain is used to refer to the United Kingdom (UK) the island of Great Britain, which consists of the countries of England, Scotland, and Wales sometimes the Roman province called Britain or Britannia The word British generally means belonging to or associated with Britain in either of the... Boer guerrillas during the Second Boer War There were two Boer wars, one in 1880-81 and the second from October 11, 1899-1902 both between the British and the settlers of Dutch origin (called Boere, Afrikaners or Voortrekkers) in South Africa that put an end to the two independent... Alfred Dreyfus in an army uniform, wearing a mustache. ... 1904 is a leap year starting on a Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... The Kingdom of Morocco is a country in northwest Africa. ... The Exposition Universelle of 1900 was a worlds fair held in Paris, France, to celebrate the achivements of the past century and to accelerate development into the next. ... Tsar Nicholas II ( 18 May 1868 – 17 July 1918)1 was the last crowned Emperor of Russia. ... The Russian Federation ( Russian: Росси́йская Федера́ция, transliteration: Rossiyskaya Federatsiya or Rossijskaja Federacija), or Russia (Russian: Росси́я, transliteration: Rossiya or Rossija), is a country that stretches over a vast expanse of eastern Europe and northern Asia. ... Edward VII King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, Emperor of India His Majesty King Edward VII (Albert Edward) (9 November 1841–6 May 1910) was the first British monarch of the House of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha. ...


Loubet’s Ministry, 27 February6 December 1892

Changes February 27 is the 58th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... December 6 is the 340th day (341st on leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1892 was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Alexandre Ribot, French politician Alexandre-Félix-Joseph Ribot (February 7, 1842 - January 13, 1923) was a French statesman, four times Prime Minister. ... Charles de Freycinet, Prime Minister of France Charles Louis de Saulces de Freycinet (November 14, 1828 - May 14, French statesman and prime minister. ... Maurice Rouvier, French statesman Maurice Rouvier (April 17, 1842 - June 7, 1911) was a French statesman. ... Jacques Marie Eugène Godefroy Cavaignac (May 21, 1853 - September 25, 1905), French politician, was born in Paris. ...


March 8 is the 67th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (68th in Leap years). ... 1892 was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Jacques Marie Eugène Godefroy Cavaignac (May 21, 1853 - September 25, 1905), French politician, was born in Paris. ...

Preceded by:
Charles de Freycinet
Prime Minister of France
1892
Succeeded by:
Alexandre Ribot
Preceded by:
Félix Faure
President of France
1899–1906
Succeeded by:
Armand Fallières


Charles de Freycinet, Prime Minister of France Charles Louis de Saulces de Freycinet (November 14, 1828 - May 14, French statesman and prime minister. ... The Prime Minister of France (Premier ministre de la France) is the functional head of the Cabinet of France. ... Alexandre Ribot, French politician Alexandre-Félix-Joseph Ribot (February 7, 1842 - January 13, 1923) was a French statesman, four times Prime Minister. ... French statesman Félix Faure François Félix Faure ( 30 January 1841– 16 February 1899) was President of France from 1895 to his death in 1899. ... The President of France, known officially as the President of the Republic (Président de la République in French), is Frances elected Head of State. ...


This article incorporates text from the public domain 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica. The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ... The Eleventh Edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica ( 1911) in many ways represents the sum of knowledge at the beginning of the 20th century. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
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